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Innovation - Social Sciences - 07.03.2024
Doing more, but learning less: The risks of AI in research
In a new paper, Yale anthropologist Lisa Messeri warns of the risks involved in envisioned AI applications for scientific research. Artificial intelligence (AI) is widely heralded for its potential to enhance productivity in scientific research. But with that promise come risks that could narrow scientists' ability to better understand the world, according to a new paper co-authored by a Yale anthropologist.

Innovation - Social Sciences - 07.03.2024
Doing more but learning less: addressing the risks of AI in research
In a new paper, Yale anthropologist Lisa Messeri warns of the risks involved in envisioned AI applications for scientific research. Artificial intelligence (AI) is widely heralded for its potential to enhance productivity in scientific research. But with that promise come risks that could narrow scientists' ability to better understand the world, according to a new paper co-authored by a Yale anthropologist.

Social Sciences - 04.03.2024
Exposure to different kinds of music influences how the brain interprets rhythm
A study of people in 15 countries reveals that while everyone favors rhythms with simple integer ratios, biases can vary quite a bit across societies. When listening to music, the human brain appears to be biased toward hearing and producing rhythms composed of simple integer ratios - for example, a series of four beats separated by equal time intervals (forming a 1:1:1 ratio).

Social Sciences - Career - 28.02.2024
Women and men unequal when it comes to the stress of teleworking
Women and men unequal when it comes to the stress of teleworking
The stress factors associated with working at home affect women and men differently, and these effects vary greatly from Quebec to France . A wide-ranging study of telecommuting since the pandemic, as part of an extensive project initiated and piloted by Gaëlle Cachat-Rosset , professor in the Faculty of Administrative Sciences at Université Laval, shows that women and men in Quebec and France are affected differently by the stress factors associated with telecommuting.

Law - Social Sciences - 28.02.2024
U-M launches interactive website documenting war crimes in Ukraine
Site features interactive maps, testimonies collected by The Reckoning Project The University of Michigan's Weiser Center for Europe and Eurasia has created a new that serves as a digital archive of testimonies from witnesses and victims of documented human rights violations, war crimes and atrocities in Ukraine since Russia's full-scale invasion on Feb.

Environment - Social Sciences - 27.02.2024
Sustainability of cultural institutions: an initial analysis
Sustainability of cultural institutions: an initial analysis
Do museums, theaters and cultural institutions have a good record in terms of social and environmental sustainability - Researchers at the University of Lausanne have conducted an international survey of over 200 major institutions.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 26.02.2024
New research highlights long-term mental health benefits of school belonging
New research highlights long-term mental health benefits of school belonging
School belonging, characterised by positive affect towards school, strong relationships with teachers, and feeling socially valued, has long been associated with immediate benefits for students' mental health. The project was a collaboration between Monash University, Deakin University, Murdoch Children's Research Institute and the University of Melbourne.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic'
’Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic’
Empathy can be transferred. This means that people can learn or unlearn empathy by observing their environment. This is shown by a new study by Würzburg neuroscientist Grit Hein . With her latest evaluations of empathy skills, Würzburg professor Grit Hein has once again disproved the old adage: "What goes around comes around".

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.02.2024
Living in a violent neighborhood affects children’s brain development
Study (PDF): Exposure to Community Violence as a Mechanism Linking Neighborhood Disadvantage to Amygdala Reactivity and the Protective Role of Parental Nurturance Living in neighborhoods with high levels of violence can affect children's development by changing the way that a part of the brain detects and responds to potential threats, which could lead to poorer mental health and other negative outcomes.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 20.02.2024
Ancient genomes reveal Down Syndrome in past societies
Ancient genomes reveal Down Syndrome in past societies
Burials show that children with Down Syndrome and Edwards Syndrome were recognized as members of their communities An international team of researchers has analysed the DNA from a world-wide sample of nearly 10,000 ancient individuals to search for cases of Down Syndrome, an uncommon genetic condition caused by the presence of an additional copy of Chromosome 21.

Social Sciences - 16.02.2024
Only one in six rural councils made use of affordable housing option
Only 17% of rural local planning authorities have made use of Rural Exception Sites, a planning policy mechanism designed to boost the supply of affordable housing in rural areas, finds a new study by UCL researchers in association with the Rural Housing Network. Rural Exception Sites were introduced in England in 1991 to enable the development of affordable homes on underdeveloped land that would otherwise be restricted for residential development.

Social Sciences - 14.02.2024
Swipe, match, happy? Dating app users less satisfied with relationship status than non-users
Swipe, match, happy? Dating app users less satisfied with relationship status than non-users
Mobile dating apps are a popular way to meet people. They promise a fun partner and a happy love life. However, a new study by Radboud researchers shows that people who use dating apps actually tend to be overall less satisfied with their relationship status than those who don't. Connecting with others through mobile dating apps has become one of the most popular ways of meeting someone.

Social Sciences - Politics - 12.02.2024
’The role of social benefits for migration is overestimated’
What factors determine which countries people migrate to? Tim Müller from the Berlin Institute for Empirical Integration and Migration Research (BIM) has analysed this in a study of 160 countries. According to the study, important pull factors for migration are not so much social benefits, but rather good job opportunities, democratic conditions and the national language.

Social Sciences - 12.02.2024
Energy poverty in Cañada Real
Energy poverty in Cañada Real
Some 4,000 people in Madrid, almost half of the inhabitants of La Cañada Real, have experienced a situation of extreme energy poverty.

Media - Social Sciences - 08.02.2024
Private television channels use the concept of MENA for unaccompanied minors more than public ones
Private television channels use the concept of MENA for unaccompanied minors more than public ones
A study by María Dolores Bañón, professor at the University of Valencia (UV), concludes that, in the television treatment of information, private channels use the treatment of MENA more than public ones to refer to unaccompanied foreign minors.

Social Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2024
Surprising new evidence on happiness and wealth
Survey of people living in small, rural communities around the world suggests income not key to happiness Global polls typically show that people in industrialized countries where incomes are relatively high report greater levels of satisfaction with life than those in low-income countries. But now the first large-scale survey to look at happiness in small, non-industrialized communities living close to nature paints quite a different picture.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 06.02.2024
More food helps orangutans learn better
More food helps orangutans learn better
The adage "necessity is the mother of invention" is often used to describe the origin from which our cultural development springs. After all, necessity in times of scarcity has forced humans to constantly invent new technologies that have driven the remarkable cumulative culture of our species. But an invention only becomes cultural when it is learned and spread by many people.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.02.2024
How stigma hurts trans health
Researchers demonstrate a link between transgender people's exposure to gender-related stigma and cortisol, a key hormone in the stress response. For transgender and nonbinary people, feeling connected to one's community may alleviate the adverse health effects of chronic exposure to stigma, the latest findings of a U.S.-Canada study suggests.

Social Sciences - 01.02.2024
Who lives in rural Canada and who's most likely to move there?
Who lives in rural Canada and who’s most likely to move there?
A study by West ern researchers shows most newcomers - and the majority of Canadians - choose to live cities. It's a historical trend negatively impact smaller communities looking to counteract the effects of an aging population , declining birth rates and economic disparities the urban-rural divide.

Health - Social Sciences - 31.01.2024
Compounded effects of racism on mental distress, alcohol use, firearm purchases among Asian Americans during pandemic
Study: Understanding the Intersectionality of COVID-19 Racism, Mental Distress, Alcohol Use, and Firearm Purchase Behavior Among Asian Americans Racism provoked during the COVID-19 pandemic is directly tied to increased firearm purchases among Asian Americans, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University.