news

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 81 - 100 of 2385.


Social Sciences - 02.10.2023
Metaphors for human fertilization are evolving
While the metaphor of an active sperm and a passive egg has long been used to describe fertilization, a more gender-egalitarian approach is circulating. In a common metaphor used to describe human fertilization, sperm cells are competitors racing to penetrate a passive egg. But as critics have noted, the description is also a -fairy tale- rooted in cultural beliefs about masculinity and femininity.

Social Sciences - 27.09.2023
Social media may increase the risk of teenage alcohol use and binge drinking
Teenagers who spend 30 minutes or more on social media every day may be more at risk of alcohol use and binge drinking, according to new research Teenagers who spend 30 minutes or more on social media every day may be more at risk of alcohol use and binge drinking, according to new research.

Social Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.09.2023
Ancient Amazonians intentionally created fertile 'dark earth'
Ancient Amazonians intentionally created fertile ’dark earth’
The rich soil holds thousands of tons of carbon, sequestered over centuries by indigenous practices, a new study suggests. The Amazon river basin is known for its immense and lush tropical forests, so one might assume that the Amazon's land is equally rich. In fact, the soils underlying the forested vegetation, particularly in the hilly uplands, are surprisingly infertile.

Social Sciences - 19.09.2023
Researchers issue urgent call to save the world’s largest flower -Rafflesia - from extinction
An international group of scientists, including botanists at the University of Oxford's Botanic Garden, has issued an urgent call for coordinated action to save the iconic genus Rafflesia , which contains the world's largest flowers. This follows a new study published this week which found that most of the 42 species are severely threatened, yet just one of these is listed in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)'s Red List of Threatened Species.

Social Sciences - 19.09.2023
At which age we are at our happiest
At which age we are at our happiest
An evaluation of over 400 samples shows how subjective well-being develops over the course of a lifespan. At what age are people at their happiest? This seemingly simple question has been studied extensively over the past decades, but a definitive answer has long been elusive. A research team from the German Sport University Cologne, Ruhr University Bochum, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the universities of Bern and Basel in Switzerland has now shed light on the question in a comprehensive meta-analytic review published on 7.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.09.2023
Identifying nutrition issues among Miawpukek youth
Identifying nutrition issues among Miawpukek youth
Two UdeM nutrition graduates went to the Newfoundland and Labrador community to identify nutrition problems among Indigenous youth. Last April and May, Université de Montréal researchers Ariane Lafortune and Milena Nardocci spent three weeks in Miawpukek , an Indigenous community in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Health - Social Sciences - 16.09.2023
Cultural racism worsens health inequities between racial groups
Cultural racism worsens health inequities between racial groups
Racism expressed through cultural norms can perpetuate negative health outcomes for nonwhite groups, according to a study by UC Berkeley School of Public Health. Researchers reviewed sociological and racism research to determine the effects of cultural racism on public health for the report, published in the Milbank Quarterly .

Social Sciences - Law - 15.09.2023
Report on Violence Against Human Rights Defenders in Brazil
Study with contributions from sociologist and jurist Maria Eugenia Trombini reveals extent A study on violence against human rights defenders in Brazil reveals more than 1,000 cases occurred between 2019 to 2022. The report was compiled by the Brazilian human rights organisations "Terra de Direitos" and "Justiça Global".

Social Sciences - Politics - 14.09.2023
Study uncovers link between anti-immigrant prejudices and support for LGBT+ rights
Cross-national research carried out by the University of Southampton and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA) into public opinion on LGBT+ rights has shown that anti-immigrant prejudices, particularly towards Muslims, contributes to explaining some of the widespread shifts in tolerance towards the LGBT+ community.

Social Sciences - 14.09.2023
Unlocked and loaded: How most gun-owning households with teens store firearms
Study: Associations between experiencing violence, owning a firearm for protection and firearm storage: a nationally representative analysis of US caregivers of teens More than a third of U.S. households with teens own firearms and more than two-thirds of these gun owners store at least one firearm unlocked and/or loaded, according to a new University of Michigan study.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.09.2023
New action guide empowers people with dementia
New action guide empowers people with dementia
More than 597,000 Canadians are living with Alzheimer's or another form of dementia, and yet big gaps remain in healthcare support. It's estimated that 85 per cent of people living with dementia are not receiving support after their diagnosis. And research shows being engaged in community is one of the biggest factors in slowing the condition's progression.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.09.2023
Hobbies linked to lower depression levels among older people
Hobbies linked to lower depression levels among older people
Having a hobby is linked to fewer depressive symptoms and higher levels of happiness, self-reported health and life satisfaction among people aged 65 and over, and this holds true across 16 countries on three continents, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the journal Nature Medicine , aimed to see if the benefits of hobbies were consistent in different national settings, and looked at data from 93,263 people aged 65 or over who had enrolled in five existing longitudinal studies in England, Japan, United States, China and 12 other European countries.

Social Sciences - Politics - 09.09.2023
Nationalism increases support for LGBTQ+ community: Enemy of enemy is my friend
Nationalism increases support for LGBTQ+ community: Enemy of enemy is my friend
An anti-gay protest by Muslims elicits more sympathy for the LGBTQ+ community than when it is organized by natives. This is especially true if the observer already held a negative view of ethnic minorities, according to an experimental study conducted by political scientists Alberto López Ortega and Stuart Turnbull-Dugarte (University of Southampton) among over 2,300 British and Spanish citizens.

Social Sciences - Health - 05.09.2023
Active children are more resilient
Active children are more resilient
The school year has hardly begun and the first exams are already approaching. According to findings by researchers from the University of Basel, school children cope better with the stress if they get plenty of daily exercise. "Get some exercise!" It's one suggestion adults frequently hear when they complain about stress in their lives.

Environment - Social Sciences - 04.09.2023
Imperial experts to study air pollution exposure inside 100 London homes
Imperial experts to study air pollution exposure inside 100 London homes
A groundbreaking Imperial-led study is looking at indoor exposure to air pollution in more than 100 homes in West London. The WellHome study, led by Imperial College London's world-leading Environmental Research Group , is a first-of-its-kind community-based study focusing on assessing air quality inside and outside of homes, as well as identifying various contaminants such as chemicals, biological agents, and microplastics that are present within the home environment.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 04.09.2023
Education about domestic abuse improves knowledge and motivation to respond to victims
Education about domestic abuse equips and empowers friends, colleagues, and neighbours to respond in positive and helpful ways when someone discloses experiences of abuse, finds a new study by researchers from UCL and SafeLives. The study, published in the journal Trauma, Violence & Abuse , synthesised the findings of 11 existing studies from around the world that examined the effects of domestic abuse training for colleagues, neighbours, or faith leaders.

Social Sciences - 04.09.2023
New research paints bleak picture of repeat violence in Scotland
Repeat victims of violence do not report to the police, even in cases involving serious injury and hospitalisation, a new study has found. Repeat victims of violence do not report to the police, even in cases involving serious injury and hospitalisation, a new study has found. Researchers based at the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) discovered that those experiencing repeat violence do not seek support due to a mistrust of authorities, social rules around 'no grassing' and the risks associated with identifying as a victim.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.09.2023
Shocking impact of family courts on women’s health exposed
A devastating study involving 45 women who accused their partners of domestic abuse has highlighted serious health problems they have suffered as a result, they say, of biased family court proceedings. While the study is qualitative and self-reported and so not generalisable to the wider population, the women's experiences now indicate a need for further research.

Social Sciences - Sport - 04.09.2023
Sporty Aussie kids kick goals for mental health
A study led by University of Queensland researchers has found children who regularly participate in sport s from an early age will have better long term mental health. Associate Professor Asad Khan from UQ's School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences led the study, which analysed the data of more than 4,200 Australian children over an eight-year period from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 01.09.2023
Deprived teens with poor learning skills at greatest risk from email scams
Disadvantaged teenagers are at greater risk of email scams and need better protection, according to an international study by a UCL researcher. The findings, published in the British Journal of Educational Studies , were based on more than 170,000 students aged 15 and show that one in five from low-income families or deprived areas could fall victim to phishing.