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Social Sciences - 12.10.2022
School of Management researchers investigate diminishing support for survivors of exploitation in UK
School of Management researchers investigate diminishing support for survivors of exploitation in UK
Project examines implications of the Nationality and Borders Act for modern slavery survivors Researchers from the University of Bath's School of Management are part of a new collaboration aiming to uncover the realities facing survivors of exploitation in the UK in wake of controversial changes to support made under the Nationality and Borders Act in May 2022.

Social Sciences - 11.10.2022
Researchers Study Social Media To Understand Roles of Optimism and Hope in the Black Lives Matter Movement
During the spring and summer of 2020, Chan Young Park and Anjalie Field watched as people flooded the streets outside their Pittsburgh apartments and around Carnegie Mellon University to protest the murder of George Floyd and participate in the renewed Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. They also watched the movement online, where hundreds of millions of social media posts expressed a range of emotions.

Career - Social Sciences - 10.10.2022
The days of the generalist are gone. Long live the specialist!
In science, specialization pays off - at least when it comes to career impact. That's the finding of a team of researchers who looked specifically at this subject. Is it better to be a generalist or a specialist? Gaétan de Rassenfosse, who holds the Chair of Innovation and IP Policy at EPFL, set about answering this question by digging through data on more than 30,000 biomedical researchers.

Social Sciences - Health - 10.10.2022
Water fluoridation is safe for children
Research from The University of Queensland has found no link between community water fluoridation and adverse effects on children's brain development. Professor Loc Do from UQ's School of Dentistry said the study examined the difference between the brain development and function of children who'd been exposed to fluoridated water in early childhood with those who weren't.

Career - Social Sciences - 06.10.2022
Rethinking young women's working lives
Rethinking young women’s working lives
New research will examine how women's early experiences of employment shape long-term career paths and reinforce inequalities in the labour market. The project, led by University of Leeds academics and funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), will explore early indications of work inequalities based on gender, and how disadvantages in employment develop over time.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 05.10.2022
Eliminating sexual violence could reduce teenage mental ill health
Eliminating sexual violence could reduce teenage mental ill health
The prevalence of serious mental health problems among 17-year-olds could drop by as much as 16.8% for girls and 8.4% for boys if they were not subjected to sexual violence, such as sexual assault and harassment, according to estimates from UCL researchers. The new research, published today in The Lancet Psychiatry , uses information from 9,971 young people born across the UK in 2000-02, who are being followed by the Millennium Cohort Study.

Social Sciences - Campus - 05.10.2022
Gender inequality can predict high rates of child physical abuse
The challenges women in lowand middle-income countries face as they seek equal rights can cause distress-and some of them may take it out on their children with physical abuse. Study: Gender Inequality in Lowand Middle-Income Countries: Associations with Parental Physical Abuse and Moderation by Child Gender In a new report published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, University of Michigan researchers found that gender inequality at the adult level perpetuates women's economic insecurity that contributes to higher levels of child abuse.

Social Sciences - 05.10.2022
Immigrants living in California are less likely to have a gun at home, more likely to fear gun violence
California has the nation's seventh-lowest gun death rate, but some segments of the population are particularly concerned about the dangers of gun violence. Findings from a new UCLA report reveal that immigrants living in California are much less likely than others to have a gun in their home — just 7.7% of immigrants had a firearm in 2021 versus 22.2% of all U.S.-born adults in California.

Social Sciences - 05.10.2022
Conspiracy theories thrive on YouTube, new study
Conspiracy theories thrive on YouTube, new study
A new study by social media researchers at the University of Sydney and QUT has found conspiracy theories are thriving on YouTube despite the platform's efforts to harden posting rules and guidelines. The study published in the Harvard Kennedy School  Misinformation Review , global leaders on misinformation research, examined YouTube comments on Covid-19 news videos featuring American business magnate and philanthropist Bill Gates and found conspiracy theories dominated.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.10.2022
Researchers highlight the critical role of Ontario’s primary care providers during the pandemic
Primary care providers have a critical role to play in the pandemic - and improving access to that care is key, say researchers from the Ontario COVID-19 Science Advisory Table. The researchers released a three-part brief ( part 1 ,  part 2  and  part 3 ) this week detailing the work of primary care providers during the first two years of the pandemic.

Social Sciences - 30.09.2022
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
What do the slogans at demonstrations tell us?
Sociologist and UdeM professor Cécile Van de Velde has analyzed text from seven major protests around the world to understand the voices of contemporary social movements. We see them on banners, hand-held signs, walls, clothing, bodies and faces: words are central to social protest. Every slogan-collective or individual, printed or handwritten, demand or rallying cry-conveys a political message and an expression of anger.

Social Sciences - 29.09.2022
Exposure to accents helps children learn words
University of Freiburg study on vocabulary acquisition uses novel game-based design Freiburg, Sep 29, 2022 If elementary school children are accustomed to many regional and foreign accents because they hear them frequently in their linguistic environment, then it is easier for them to learn new words from other children who speak with unfamiliar accents.

Social Sciences - 27.09.2022
New insights on teen vaping behaviour in Australia
A new study tracking Australian teenager beliefs and behaviours using vapes (e-cigarettes) has found many are readily accessing and using illegal vaping products, writes A/Prof Becky Freeman, Dr Christina Watts and Sam Egger. Teen vaping has been in the news, with reports of  rapidly increasing use  and  illegal sales  of e-cigarettes.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 22.09.2022
People of early medieval England had mostly north-western European heritage
People of early medieval England had mostly north-western European heritage
A genetic and archaeological study involving a UCL researcher has revealed the great extent of migration from continental Europe into the East of England during the early Middle Ages. In the largest early medieval ancient DNA study to date, an interdisciplinary team consisting of geneticists and archaeologists, led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, analysed over 400 individuals from ancient Britain, Ireland, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Social Sciences - Criminology / Forensics - 21.09.2022
Not all arms possessors are the same: reduce armed violence among youth in Rotterdam by addressing underlying problems
The media has often drawn attention to increasing armed violence amongst youth. Since 2019, an increase in violence amongst youth has become apparent. Rotterdam and its surroundings have been the scene of this violence more than once. Although national and local campaigns have been launched and research has been done in Rotterdam and the Netherlands, much information on the scope, cause, and background of this issue among the youth in Rotterdam remained inconclusive.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
Dementia rates over 20% higher among black adults than UK average
Dementia rates are 22% higher among black people in the UK compared to white people, while black and South Asian dementia patients die younger, and sooner after diagnosis, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The authors of the study, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia , say their findings demonstrate a need for more targeted interventions to reduce dementia risks and improve treatment outcomes in ethnic minority communities.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
From Continental Europe to England
From Continental Europe to England
Archaeogenetic study reveals large-scale continental migration into the East of England during the early Medieval Period In the largest early-medieval population study to date, an interdisciplinary team consisting of geneticists and archaeologists - led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Central Lancashire - analysed over 400 individuals from ancient Britain, Ireland, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
Nightmares in middle age linked to dementia risk
People who experience frequent bad dreams in middle age are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia later in life, according to new research. A new study , published in The Lancet journal, eClinicalMedicine by researchers at the University of Birmingham, suggests nightmares may become prevalent several years or even decades before the characteristic memory and thinking problems of dementia set in.

Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
When school feels 'like prison,' test scores, college attendance drop
When school feels ’like prison,’ test scores, college attendance drop
Students in high surveillance schools who get punished often can feel "less like students and more like suspects," says Hopkins professor Odis Johnson Students at high schools with prominent security measures have lower math scores, are less likely to attend college, and are suspended more compared to students in schools with less surveillance, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study.