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Veterinary Science



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Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
07.02.2018
Racehorses unaffected by Hendra vaccination: study
An extensive study for the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission published in the Australian Veterinary Journal this week demonstrates that vaccinating against the Hendra virus does not reduce the chances of a horse winning. A world-first study led by the University of Sydney has confirmed vaccination against the deadly Hendra virus does not affect the racing performance of thoroughbred horses.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
20.12.2017
Novel tool for vets and farmers to monitor and reduce antibiotics on dairy farms
Veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham have produced a new tool to help UK dairy vets and farmers monitor and reduce use of antibiotics in their dairy herds to help combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the farming industry and beyond. It follows a new study by the Nottingham Vet School showing that, in a large sample of dairy farms, 25% of farms used 50% of the total antibiotics used across all farms in a year - with antibiotic footbaths accounting for the biggest volume dispersed into the food chain.
Veterinary Science
23.11.2017
FEI extends global equine injuries research agreement with Glasgow University for further two years
The FEI has extended its highly successful global equine injuries research partnership with the University of Glasgow for another two years through to 2019, to further develop the Global Endurance Injuries Study (GEIS). The extension will maximise the impact of the GEIS across Endurance and also look at the potential development of similar methodology for other FEI disciplines.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
09.11.2017
Taking Blood Using ’Push-Pull’ Method Gets Accurate Results With Fewer Pokes, Penn Study Shows
Thursday, November 9, 2017 A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special "mixing" technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
07.11.2017
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research finds
Research by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury. The study, carried out by a team of vets with anatomical, pathological and clinical expertise, discovered that current methods of injection are more likely to damage the sciatic nerve - particularly in dairy cattle with a low body condition score, such as those cows who have recently calved.
Life Sciences - Veterinary Science
06.09.2017
Getting hook bending off the hook
Getting hook bending off the hook
The bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket by the crow Betty 15 years ago stunned the scientific world. However, the finding was recently relegated as similar behavioural routines were discovered in the natural repertoire of the same species, suggesting the possibility that Betty's tool manufacture was less intelligent than previously believed.
Life Sciences - Veterinary Science
31.08.2017
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
A new study led by academics at the Bristol Veterinary School has reviewed the literature on the use of antimicrobials (AM) in livestock practice together with the views of stakeholders. The study found that although there are some barriers to change, there is a clear awareness of the issue among the livestock sectors and a willingness to modify AM use.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
18.08.2017
Paper: Clinical signs best predictors of mortality in critically ill calves
Paper: Clinical signs best predictors of mortality in critically ill calves
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Clinical signs such as gastrointestinal problems or septic arthritis may be better predictors of mortality in neonatal calves with diarrhea than blood pH levels and other laboratory findings, a new study suggests. The research also may finally resolve a century-old debate among scientists about the blood pH levels needed to sustain life in humans and other mammals.
Veterinary Science - Life Sciences
18.08.2017
Calves should receive more pain relief during husbandry procedures, researchers find
Calves may not be receiving the right level of pain relief when undergoing routine animal husbandry procedures including castration and disbudding, new research has found. The study from The University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science , published in the Vet Record , found that despite being recognised as being as painful as other procedures, calf husbandry procedures were significantly less likely to include the use of analgesics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in addition to the local anaesthetic that is routinely used.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
01.08.2017
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external features
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external features
As many as a half of all short-nosed dogs such as pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs experience breathing difficulties related to their facial structure. However, research published today by the University of Cambridge suggests that there is no way to accurately predict from visible features whether an apparently healthy pug or French bulldog will go on to develop breathing difficulties.
Veterinary Science
05.04.2017
Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clients
Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clients
When advising on animal health and welfare, veterinarians often struggle to engage with the motivational needs of their clients. New research has shown a change is needed in how veterinarians communicate with and advise animal owners, to promote engagement with their advice and protect the animals in their care.
Agronomy/Food Science - Veterinary Science
14.11.2016
Farm vets can help farmers minimise damage to meat
A new investigation into how meat can be damaged by farm injections has found that 4 per cent of cattle slaughtered in abattoirs in England had injection site lesions in the carcasses. The study by researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Bristol shows that compliance with recommended injection protocols could be improved to reduce this damage.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
22.09.2016
Sleeping sickness can also be transmitted and spread via the skin
Scientists have made an important new discovery in the study of Human African Trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as African sleeping sickness. The findings could have a major impact on the way the disease is diagnosed, treated and potentially eradicated. The team of researchers, from the University of Glasgow's Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology and the Institut Pasteur in Paris, have discovered that skin plays a significant but overlooked role in harbouring and transmitting the parasite that causes the condition, which is often fatal if left untreated.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
15.09.2016
Building trust between vets and farmers key to encouraging cattle vaccination, study finds
Building trusting relationships between veterinary surgeons and farmers is crucial to improving animal health on dairy farms, researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. The study on perceptions and challenges of vaccinations among vets was carried out by academics in the University's School of Veterinary Medicine and Science on behalf of ADHB Dairy, a not-for-profit organisation working on behalf of Britain's dairy farmers.
Veterinary Science - Administration/Government
12.09.2016
Research proves a cash cow for cattle producers
Research proves a cash cow for cattle producers
Meat & Livestock Australia is funding new University of Queensland research aimed at reducing foetal and calf loss in beef cattle breeding herds across northern Australia.
Veterinary Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
01.09.2016
Shedding light on deadly colic
New research by The University of Nottingham has found that more than 90% of horse owners did not feel confident in spotting early signs of colic. Now, The British Horse Society (BHS) and The University of Nottingham have teamed up to help horse owners combat the life-threatening condition at today's (1 September) launch of the REACT Now to Beat Colic campaign.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
18.08.2016
Canine babesiosis outbreak under control – but needs monitoring
Scientists at the University of Liverpool are using the health records of dogs to monitor the status of a potentially fatal tick-borne disease that appears to have been imported into the UK. Canine babesiosis is transmitted to dogs by infected ticks, with symptoms including a lack of appetite, fever and jaundice.
Life Sciences - Veterinary Science
18.07.2016
Research to help racehorses put their best foot forward
An international research team is working to understand how horseshoes affect foot skeleton stress in racehorses, in a project that is likely to benefit the racing industry and protect horses from injury. University of Queensland School of Biomedical Sciences research team leader Dr Olga Panagiotopoulou said musculoskeletal injury was one of the main animal welfare concerns in the industry.
Veterinary Science
07.07.2016
Research to reveal welfare priorities of UK equines at Westminster event
Research to reveal welfare priorities of UK equines at Westminster event
New research revealing the welfare priorities of the UK's 800,000 equines will be outlined at an event at the House of Commons next week [Tuesday 12 July]. The four-year research study, led by academics at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences and funded by World Horse Welfare, aimed to understand the welfare status of horses in England and Wales, identify priority welfare issues and explore horse owner and industry experts' perceptions of these issues.
Veterinary Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
01.12.2015
Dogs needed for study to investigate neck pain
Dogs needed for study to investigate neck pain
Owners of one of the UK's most popular dog breeds, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, are being asked by researchers at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences to take part in a study to investigate a novel method of assessing neck pain in dogs. Syringomyelia is a progressive inherited neurological disease of the neck spinal cord in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS), which may cause neck pain and affects around 70 per cent of CKCS over six-years-old.
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