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Veterinary Science - 06.12.2018
Shelter dogs get second leash on life
Shelter dogs get second leash on life
Better behaviour assessment could be the key to more successful adoptions and reducing risk of euthanasia for shelter dogs, according to new University of Queensland research. School of Veterinary Science PhD candidate Liam Clay is collaborating with RSPCA Queensland to make behavioural assessments better at reflecting shelter dogs' true behaviours, and their adoption suitability.

Veterinary Science - 30.11.2018
Stanford University statement on wrestling investigation
Facebook Twitter Email The safety and wellbeing of our students, including student-athletes, is vitally important to Stanford. We take this commitment deeply seriously in all of our programs and activities. Stanford's Title IX Office has completed a sexual harassment investigation into concerns from some former wrestling team members regarding conduct in a Stanford locker room a number of years ago.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 26.11.2018
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
A study conducted by Agroscope's Swiss National Stud Farm (SNSF) in collaboration with the University of Neuchâtel refuted the assumption that cribbing horses perform less well in complicated learning situations than other horses. All horses in the study were able to recognise symbols as well as solve inverse conclusion exercises, which are difficult for horses.

Veterinary Science - Social Sciences - 22.11.2018
Awareness of 22q
Awareness of 22q
Researchers at Cardiff University are working to understand a relatively common genetic condition that most people haven't heard of. The ECHO study, based at the Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, aims to identify the challenges faced by people with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), which is thought to be the second most common genetic condition behind Down's Syndrome.

Veterinary Science - Materials Science - 21.11.2018
Sugar supplement slows tumour growth and can improve cancer treatment
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer. The results of the study today (Wednesday). Tumours use more glucose than normal, healthy tissues.

Veterinary Science - Health - 21.11.2018
Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts
Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts
The Mexican tetra fish can repair its heart after damage - something researchers have been striving to achieve in humans for years. Now, new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) published in Cell Reports suggests that a gene called lrrc10 may hold the key to this fish's remarkable ability.

Veterinary Science - 21.11.2018
Machine learning can be used to predict which patients require emergency admission
Machine learning can help healthcare workers predict whether patients may require emergency hospital admission, new study has shown. Machine learning - a field of artificial intelligence that uses statistical techniques to enable computer systems to 'learn' from data - can be used to analyse electronic health records and predict the risk of emergency hospital admissions, a new study from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

Computer Science / Telecom - Veterinary Science - 21.11.2018
A hydrogel that adheres firmly to cartilage and meniscus
EPFL researchers have developed a hydrogel - made up of nearly 90% water - that naturally adheres to soft tissue like cartilage and the meniscus. If the hydrogel carries repair cells, it could help damaged tissue to heal. Some types of body tissue, like cartilage and meniscus, have little or no blood supply and are unable to heal if damaged.

Veterinary Science - Materials Science - 20.11.2018
Modified virus used to kill cancer cells
Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumours - healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system and supplying it with growth factors and nutrients - have been specifically targeted in this way.

Veterinary Science - 01.10.2018
New campaign asks horse owners to help researchers improve care of wounds
Horse owners in the UK are being invited to take part in a new project to help improve the management of the skin and flesh wounds that are a common type of emergency in horses. Researchers at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham have teamed up with the equine charity, The British Horse Society , to launch the Equine Wound Project online today, Monday 1 st October 2018.

Health - Veterinary Science - 08.08.2018
Spring into vaccination this kitten season to avoid killer virus
Spring into vaccination this kitten season to avoid killer virus
A spike in vaccination has been announced, following the re-emergence of the deadly Feline Panleukopenia Virus (FPV) and an awareness campaign, but with the kitten season approaching there is no room for complacency In good news for feline lovers this International Cat Day, the Cat Protection Society of NSW has announced its latest Ipsos survey shows the proportion of vaccinated pet cats has risen to 85 percent after last year's confirmation about the re-emergence of a killer cat virus and subsequent efforts to raise awareness about vaccination.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 16.07.2018
Tongue-tied horses: why this can be an issue in Australian racing
Tongue-tied horses: why this can be an issue in Australian racing
As ABC's Four Corners showed last week, the use of tongue ties in Australian racehorses is much more prevalent than elsewhere. Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science Paul McGreevy explains why this matters. This explainer published in The Conversation last week as a companion piece to the ABC TV Four Corners current affairs special.

Veterinary Science - Health - 05.04.2018
New treatment to turn down the volume of "roaring" in horses
The effects of a breathing condition in thoroughbred and tall horses is set to be reduced by new University of Queensland treatment techniques.

Health - Veterinary Science - 13.03.2018
New Guidelines Offer Vets and Owners the Latest on Preventing and Treating Strangles, 'Strep Throat in Horses'
New Guidelines Offer Vets and Owners the Latest on Preventing and Treating Strangles, ’Strep Throat in Horses’
Just as strep throat can run rampant in elementary schools, strangles, the "strep throat" of horses, caused by a different Streptococcus bacterium, Streptococcus equi sp equi , is highly contagious. Lymph nodes in the head and neck region become swollen and develop abscesses, resulting in nasal discharge and drainage from the throat.

Veterinary Science - Innovation / Technology - 19.02.2018
Using ultrasound to predict return to form for injured racehorses
A new technique that uses ultrasound to predict a racehorse's likelihood of a return to racing after a tendon injury has been developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham, Oakham Equine Hospital and the world-famous Hong Kong Jockey Club. In this unique collaboration, the team has created a scoring system for grading tendon injuries in racehorses when they first occur and used this in a large study to determine which ultrasound features will predict whether or not the horse will successfully race again after rehabilitation.

Health - Veterinary Science - 07.02.2018
Racehorses unaffected by Hendra vaccination: study
An extensive study for the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission published in the Australian Veterinary Journal this week demonstrates that vaccinating against the Hendra virus does not reduce the chances of a horse winning. A world-first study led by the University of Sydney has confirmed vaccination against the deadly Hendra virus does not affect the racing performance of thoroughbred horses.

Health - Veterinary Science - 20.12.2017
Novel tool for vets and farmers to monitor and reduce antibiotics on dairy farms
Veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham have produced a new tool to help UK dairy vets and farmers monitor and reduce use of antibiotics in their dairy herds to help combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the farming industry and beyond. It follows a new study by the Nottingham Vet School showing that, in a large sample of dairy farms, 25% of farms used 50% of the total antibiotics used across all farms in a year - with antibiotic footbaths accounting for the biggest volume dispersed into the food chain.

Veterinary Science - 23.11.2017
FEI extends global equine injuries research agreement with Glasgow University for further two years
The FEI has extended its highly successful global equine injuries research partnership with the University of Glasgow for another two years through to 2019, to further develop the Global Endurance Injuries Study (GEIS). The extension will maximise the impact of the GEIS across Endurance and also look at the potential development of similar methodology for other FEI disciplines.

Health - Veterinary Science - 09.11.2017
Taking Blood Using ’Push-Pull’ Method Gets Accurate Results With Fewer Pokes, Penn Study Shows
Thursday, November 9, 2017 A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special "mixing" technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.

Health - Veterinary Science - 07.11.2017
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research finds
Research by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury. The study, carried out by a team of vets with anatomical, pathological and clinical expertise, discovered that current methods of injection are more likely to damage the sciatic nerve - particularly in dairy cattle with a low body condition score, such as those cows who have recently calved.
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