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Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.01.2023
Dietary Exposure to Nitrites Associated with Increased Type 2 Diabetes Risk
More than 15,000 packaged products on the French market currently contain nitrites or nitrates. Although commonly used to ensure better preservation of processed meats (ham, sausages, etc.), the safety of these food additives is the subject of debate. Nitrites and nitrates are also naturally found in various foods (particularly vegetables) and in drinking water, but agricultural and industrial practices can increase their levels.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.01.2023
Mixture of crops provide ecological benefits for agricultural landscapes
Mixture of crops provide ecological benefits for agricultural landscapes
Researchers at Göttingen University investigate attractiveness of wheat-bean crop mixtures for pollinating insects There are often too few flowering plants in agricultural landscapes, which is one reason for the decline of pollinating insects. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now investigated how a mixture of crops of faba beans (broad beans) and wheat affects the number of pollinating insects.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.01.2023
Protecting the microbiota from the harmful effects of food additives with a bacterium
Protecting the microbiota from the harmful effects of food additives with a bacterium
Emulsifiers are food additives used to improve the texture and extend the shelf life of foods. They are found in many processed foods (ice creams, packaged cakes, sauces...), although their harmful effects on intestinal balance have been demonstrated. In a new study, scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Université Paris Cité at the Cochin Institute in Paris aimed to counteract the deleterious effects induced by the consumption of emulsifiers by fortifying the intestinal epithelium via its repopulation by a bacterium naturally present in the intestine: Akkermansia muciniphila .

Agronomy / Food Science - 13.01.2023
Why chocolate feels so good? It ’s down to lubrication
Scientists have decoded the physical process that takes place in the mouth when chocolate is eaten, as it changes from a solid into a smooth emulsion that many people find totally irresistible. By analysing each of the steps, the interdisciplinary research team at the University of Leeds hope it will lead to the development of a new generation of luxury chocolate that will have the same feel and texture but will be healthier to consume.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 22.12.2022
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
Domingo Carlos Salazar, CIDEGENT researcher at the University of Valencia (UV), has led a study that dates the occupation of the Neolithic site of Cova Bonica, located near the coast and the Llobregat River Delta. The results, published in the Frontiers magazine, confirm the important weight of an agricultural-livestock economy 7,400 years ago now, with a diet based on domesticated species of cereals and animals, and without the presence of fish.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.12.2022
Perception and knowledge of food sustainability
Perception and knowledge of food sustainability
Every year, about a third of all food produced in the world —about 1.3 billion tonnes— is wasted in consumers' homes and retail businesses, according to the United Nations (UN). The food sector also accounts for around 30% of the world's total energy consumption and 22% of greenhouse gas emissions.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.12.2022
Paying farmers to create woodland and wetland is the most cost-effective way to hit UK environment targets
Study of farmer preferences shows that turning whole areas of farmland into habitats comes with half the price tag of integrating nature into productive farmland, if biodiversity and carbon targets are to be met.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 19.12.2022
Producing fertiliser without carbon emissions
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the Carnegie Institution for Science have shown how nitrogen fertiliser could be produced more sustainably. This is necessary not only to protect the climate, but also to reduce dependence on imported natural gas and to increase food security. Intensive agriculture is possible only if the soil is fertilised with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 16.12.2022
Calculate the land-use impact of your diet
Agriculture is one of the leading causes of human induced land-use change globally. Our food consumption and production, especially in industrialised countries, is thereby damaging the planet.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.12.2022
UK needs to use phosphorus sustainably
Phosphorus use in the UK needs to be better managed and used in a much more sustainable way to reduce river pollution and increase resilience over rising fertiliser prices, say researchers. Despite phosphorus being a key nutrient in the agricultural sector for which there is no alternative, the food and feedstock industries rely on imports from a small number of countries including China, Russia and Morocco.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.12.2022
Harmful fungal toxins in wheat: a growing threat across Europe
Harmful fungal toxins in wheat: a growing threat across Europe
Harmful fungal toxins are on the rise in Europe's wheat and affect almost half of crops, according to a new study led by the University of Bath. Wheat - the most widely cultivated crop in the world - is under growing attack from harmful toxins. Across Europe, almost half of wheat crops are impacted by the fungal infection that gives rise to these toxins, according to a study led by fungal biologist Dr Neil Brown from the University of Bath, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Exeter.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 13.12.2022
Intensive agriculture turned a wild plant into a pervasive weed
Intensive agriculture turned a wild plant into a pervasive weed
New research published in Science shows how the rise of modern agriculture turned a North American native plant, common waterhemp, into a problematic agricultural weed. An international team led by researchers at the University of British Columbia with colleagues at the University of Toronto, compared 187 waterhemp samples from modern farms and neighbouring wetlands with more than 100 historical samples dating as far back as 1820 that had been stored in museums across North America.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.12.2022
Fat-busters: Walnuts, green tea and duckweed
News from Abdominal fat poses a serious health risk. Also known as visceral fat, it is closely linked to the onset of heart disease, diabetes and hypertension. Now an international research team including the Faculty of Medicine at Leipzig University have discovered that a certain Mediterranean diet can help banish unwelcome belly fat.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 08.12.2022
Agriculture makes the weed
Agriculture makes the weed
How intensive agriculture turned a wild plant into a pervasive weed Agriculture is driving rapid evolutionary change, not just on farms, but also in wild species in the surroundings. New research shows how the rise of modern agriculture has turned a North American native plant, common waterhemp, into a problematic agricultural weed by mutations in hundreds of genes related to drought tolerance, rapid growth, and resistance to herbicides.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.11.2022
How women can reduce risk of hip fracture
Increasing intake of protein and drinking regular cups of tea or coffee is a way women could reduce their risk of suffering a hip fracture, according to new research. Food scientists at the University of Leeds have found that for women, a 25 grams a day increase in protein was associated with, on average, a 14% reduction in their risk of hip fracture.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.11.2022
Biodiversity in drylands can mitigate climate change
Biodiversity in drylands can mitigate climate change
International team of researchers completes first global field study on the ecological impact of grazing in drylands Grazing is a form of land use which sustains the livelihood for billions of people. It is especially important in drylands, which cover around 41 percent of the Earth's land surface, hosts one in three humans inhabiting our planet and over 50 % of all livestock live.

Agronomy / Food Science - 11.11.2022
Researchers warn of nutritional hoaxes and launch a campaign to detect them on social networks
Researchers warn of nutritional hoaxes and launch a campaign to detect them on social networks
The CADENUSA project (Awareness Campaign on Misinformation and Hoaxes in Nutrition and Food Safety), funded by the UNESCO Chair and directed by three researchers from the ScienceFlows group of the Un

Agronomy / Food Science - 09.11.2022
Better welfare for chickens and pigs
The health and welfare of animals that produce our food is of great importance. Researchers from the University of Utrecht and the Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Nutrition (ILVO) in Flanders, among others, received almost eight million euros from the European Union to develop in cooperation with the industry innovative measuring equipment to monitor the welfare of broiler chickens and fattening pigs as they are loaded, unloaded, transported and slaughtered.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.11.2022
Motivation is affected by oxidative stress, nutrition can help
Motivation is affected by oxidative stress in the brain, a study by EPFL and Nestlé shows. The findings also suggest motivation can be improved through nutritional interventions. In life, motivation can be the difference between success and failure, goal-setting and aimlessness, well-being and unhappiness.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.11.2022
Study confirms that processed foods key to rising obesity 
The modern pallet's preference for highly processed and refined foods over a protein-rich diet is a key contributor to the high obesity rates in the Western world. A year-long study of the dietary habits of 9,341 Australians has backed growing evidence that highly processed and refined foods are the leading contributor of rising obesity rates in the Western world.
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