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Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.08.2011
Researchers identify how insects resist Bt pesticides
Researchers identify how insects resist Bt pesticides
For the first time, researchers have identified how cabbage looper caterpillars in the field develop resistance to the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which naturally occurs in the soil and on plants and has been developed into the most successful and widely used biological insecticide. When ingested, the insecticidal toxins in Bt kill insects by destroying their guts.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.07.2011
Beef up your muscles, reduce your diabetes risk
More muscle mass — and not just less body fat — is critical to lowering your risk for type 2 diabetes, a new UCLA study suggests.

Chemistry - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.07.2011
Honey bee tolerates some synthetic pesticides
Honey bee tolerates some synthetic pesticides
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A new study reveals how enzymes in the honey bee gut detoxify pesticides commonly used to kill mites in the honey bee hive. This is the first study to tease out the precise molecular mechanisms that allow a pollinating insect to tolerate exposure to these potentially deadly compounds.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.07.2011
New research to investigate brain responsiveness to food and the link with type 2 diabetes
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are set to monitor brain reactions when exposed to images of food in a study which will provide an insight into the difficulties of weight and diet control faced by young diabetes patients. Brain reactions to pictures of different types of food will be compared between teenagers who are a healthy weight, teenagers who are obese, and teenagers who have type 2 diabetes.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.06.2011
Family meals promote healthier weights, eating behaviors in children
Family meals promote healthier weights, eating behaviors in children
Barbara H. Fiese, a professor of human development and family studies, says family meal can be one of the most powerful times for promoting health.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.06.2011
Will rising BMIs reverse heart attack decline?
Will rising BMIs reverse heart attack decline?
UCL Epidemiology & Public Health UCL Primary Care & Population Health European Heart Journal Medical Research Council British Heart Foundation Better control of cholesterol levels and blood pressure and a decline in smoking have contributed to a 74% drop in the risk of heart attack among nearly 10,000 civil servants working in London over a 20-year period, according to new research from the UCL-led Whitehall II study.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.05.2011
Genetic master switch identified in obesity and diabetes
Genetic master switch identified in obesity and diabetes
A gene linked to type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels has been identified as a 'master regulator' by a team at King's College London and the University of Oxford. The researchers found that the gene controls the behaviour of other genes found within fat tissues in the body. As fat plays a key role in susceptibility to metabolic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes, the regulatory gene could be a possible target for future treatments to fight these diseases.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 16.05.2011
'Master switch' gene for obesity and diabetes
’Master switch’ gene for obesity and diabetes
A team of researchers, led by King's College London and the University of Oxford, have found that a gene linked to type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels is in fact a 'master regulator' gene, which controls the behaviour of other genes found within fat in the body. As fat plays a key role in susceptibility to metabolic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes, this study highlights the regulatory gene as a possible target for future treatments to fight these diseases.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.05.2011
Obesity impairs muscle function in rats, Penn State researchers find
Hershey, Pa. Obesity appears to impair normal muscle function in rats, an observation that could have significant implications for humans, according to Penn State researchers. "Our findings demonstrate that obesity involves more than accumulating excess fat and carrying excess weight," said Rudolf J. Schilder, American Physiological Society postdoctoral fellow in physiological genomics, Penn State College of Medicine.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 06.05.2011
Air-quality issues gain importance in animal agriculture
Air quality around large livestock operations has gained importance as a local, national and global policy issue, a new study led by a University of Minnesota professor shows. The paper is the first to incorporate comprehensive current research on air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, odors and livestock housing/waste distribution practices, among other topics.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 03.05.2011
Midlife overweight may increase risk of dementia
A novel study from Karolinska Institutet shows that being overweight or obese during middle age may increase the risk of certain dementias. The research is based on data from the Swedish Twin registry and published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Currently, 1.6 billion adults are overweight or obese worldwide, and over 50 percent of adults in the United States and Europe fit into this category.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 31.03.2011
Research shows taste perception of bitter foods depends on genetics
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. How we perceive the taste of bitter foods - and whether we like or dislike them, at least initially - depends on which versions of taste-receptor genes a person has, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. Those genes affect dietary choices, such as whether we eat enough vegetables, drink alcoholic beverages or enjoy citrus fruits.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.03.2011
Researchers discover link between a gene, lack of folate and colon cancer risk in mice
Cornell researchers report that they have identified a gene that increases the risk for colon cancer in laboratory mice when their diets lack folate. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. More than 50,000 people die each year in this country from colon cancer, many due to a lack of early detection.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 15.03.2011
Gene identified that causes neural tube defects in mice
Gene identified that causes neural tube defects in mice
Cornell researchers report that they have identified a gene that causes neural tube defects (NTDs) in laboratory mice. NTDs, also known as spina bifida and anencephaly, are one of the most common birth defects in the United States, occurring every 1 in 1,000 births. Women who are at risk potential of having babies with NTDs cannot be identified because the genes causing this birth defect have not been evident.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 03.03.2011
Researchers find that modern humans originated in southern Africa
Modern humans likely originated in southern Africa, rather than eastern Africa as is generally assumed, according to the results of a large study of genetic variation. BY SANDEEP RAVINDRAN The largest analysis of the genomic diversity of African hunter-gatherer populations reveals that modern humans likely originated in southern Africa, rather than eastern Africa as is generally assumed.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 03.03.2011
Middle aged diabetics can die six years earlier
Middle aged diabetics can die six years earlier
Having diabetes in mid-life may reduce a person's life expectancy by an average of six years, according to a large, multinational study coordinated by the University of Cambridge. Diabetes is already known to approximately double the risk of heart attacks and strokes, but these new findings show that people with type 2 diabetes are also at greater risk of dying from several other diseases, including cancer and infection.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.03.2011
Happiness improves health and lengthens life
Happiness improves health and lengthens life
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A review of more than 160 studies of human and animal subjects has found "clear and compelling evidence" that - all else being equal - happy people tend to live longer and experience better health than their unhappy peers. The study, in the journal Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, is the most comprehensive review so far of the evidence linking happiness to health outcomes.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 01.03.2011
Sugary drinks associated with higher blood pressure
Sugary drinks associated with higher blood pressure
Sugary drinks associated with higher blood pressure Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with higher blood pressure, according to a study of over 2,500 people reported in the journal Hypertension. Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with higher blood pressure, according to a study of over 2,500 people reported this week in the journal Hypertension .

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.02.2011
Ancient Mesoamerican sculpture uncovered in southern Mexico
Ancient Mesoamerican sculpture uncovered in southern Mexico
With one arm raised and a determined scowl, the figure looks ready to march right off his carved tablet and into the history books. If only we knew who he was — corn god? Tribal chief? Sacred priest? "It's beautiful and was obviously very important," says University of Wisconsin-Madison archaeologist John Hodgson of the newly discovered stone monument.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.02.2011
Obesity has doubled since 1980, major global analysis of risk factors reveals
Obesity has doubled since 1980, major global analysis of risk factors reveals
Obesity has doubled since 1980, major global analysis of risk factors reveals Study shows western high-income countries have achieved impressive progress in lowering hypertension and cholesterol The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, according to a major study on how three important heart disease risk factors have changed across the world over the last three decades.