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Astronomy / Space Science - 17.01.2022
Palomar Survey Instrument Analyzes Impact of Starlink Satellites
Since 2019, SpaceX has been launching an increasing number of internet satellites into orbit around Earth. The satellite constellation, called Starlink, now includes nearly 1,800 members orbiting at altitudes of about 550 kilometers. Astronomers have expressed concerns that that these objects, which can appear as streaks in telescope images, could hamper their scientific observations.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.01.2022
'Slushy' magma ocean led to formation of the Moon's crust
’Slushy’ magma ocean led to formation of the Moon’s crust
Scientists have shown how the freezing of a 'slushy' ocean of magma may be responsible for the composition of the Moon's crust. Cooling of the early magma ocean drove such vigorous convection that crystals remained suspended as a slurry, like the crystals in a slushy machine. Jerome Neufeld The scientists, from the University of Cambridge and the Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon, have proposed a new model of crystallisation, where crystals remained suspended in liquid magma over hundreds of millions of years as the lunar 'slush' froze and solidified.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.01.2022
New insights into seasons on a planet outside our solar system
New insights into seasons on a planet outside our solar system
XO-3b, a hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) Imagine being in a place where the winds are so strong that they move at the speed of sound. That's just one aspect of the atmosphere on XO-3b, one of a class of exoplanets (planets outside our solar system), known as hot Jupiters.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 13.01.2022
A new model for the formation of the lunar crust
In a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, two scientists - Chloé Michaut from Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon 1 and Jerome A. Neufeld from University of Cambridge 2 , propose a new model of crystallization of the lunar magma ocean where the crystals remain suspended in the lunar interior and the formation of the crust only begins once a critical crystal content is reached.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 13.01.2022
University of Glasgow researchers lend support to major Martian meteorite study
Researchers from the School of Geographical & Earth Sciences have contributed to a new study ­of a Martian meteorite which could provide insights into the reactions that led to the building blocks of life on early Earth. The study, led by the Carnegie Institution for Science and , demonstrates that organic molecules found in a meteorite that hurtled to Earth from Mars were synthesized during interactions between water and rocks that occurred on the Red Planet about 4 billion years ago.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.01.2022
International collaboration offers new evidence of a gravitational wave background
International collaboration offers new evidence of a gravitational wave background
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email The results of a comprehensive search for a background of ultra-low frequency gravitational waves has been announced by an international team of astronomers including scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.01.2022
CHEOPS reveals a rugby ball-shaped exoplanet
CHEOPS reveals a rugby ball-shaped exoplanet
A research team involving the Universities of Bern and Geneva has identified the strong tidal influence on WASP-103b. With the help of the CHEOPS space telescope, an international team including researchers from the Universities of Bern and Geneva as well as the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS, was able to detect the deformation of an exoplanet for the first time.

Astronomy / Space Science - Campus - 11.01.2022
Researchers study Milky Way’s ’feeding habits’ in search of clues about its origins
Astronomers are one step closer to revealing the properties of dark matter enveloping our Milky Way galaxy thanks to a new map of 12 streams of stars orbiting within our galactic halo. Understanding these star streams is very important for astronomers. As well as revealing the dark matter that holds the stars in their orbits, they also tell us about the formation history of the Milky Way, revealing that the galaxy has steadily grown over billions of years by shredding and consuming smaller stellar systems.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2022
Most Luminous ’Cow’ to Shine in X-Rays
Another member of the new "Cow" class of supernova explosions has been discovered-the brightest one seen in X-rays to date. The new event, dubbed AT2020mrf, is only the fifth found so far belonging to the Cow class of supernovae. The group is named after the first supernova found in this class, AT2018cow, whose randomly generated name just happened to spell the word "cow." What lies behind these unusual stellar explosions? New evidence points to either active black holes or neutron stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - Campus - 10.01.2022
Black Hole Devours a Star Decades Ago, Goes Unnoticed Until Now
Every galaxy, including our own Milky Way, has at its center a massive black hole whose gravity influences the stars around it. Generally, the stars orbit around the black hole without incident, but sometimes a star will wander a little too close, and the black hole will "make a meal" of the star in a process astrophysicists have termed spaghettification.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 07.01.2022
Eccentric exoplanet discovered
Eccentric exoplanet discovered
Led by the University of Bern, an international research team has discovered a sub-Neptune exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star. The discovery was also made thanks to observations performed by the SAINT-EX observatory in Mexico. SAINT-EX is run by a consortium including the Center for Space and Habitability (CSH) at the University of Bern and the National Center of Competence in Research NCCR PlanetS.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.01.2022
Discovery of the least 'metallic' stellar structure in the Milky Way
Discovery of the least ’metallic’ stellar structure in the Milky Way
98.5% of the Sun is made up of two light chemical elements, hydrogen and helium, while the remaining 1.5% consists of other heavier elements such as carbon, oxygen, and iron. The abundance of these heavier elements in a star is called its 'metallicity', and varies from star to star. It now turns out that our Galaxy is home to a stellar structure uniquely made of stars with extremely low metallicity, with a heavy element content 2,500 times lower than that of the Sun.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.01.2022
Physicist Seeks To Understand Dark Matter with Webb Telescope
The much-anticipated launch of the James Webb Space Telescope will usher in a new era of research on our universe. Among the many researchers planning to take advantage of the data from the Hubble Space Telescope's successor is Carnegie Mellon University Associate Professor of Physics Matthew Walker , who is principal investigator of a program making use of data collected in telescope's first year of operation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 27.12.2021
NASA’s Largest and Most Powerful Telescope Launches
On December 25, the largest and most powerful space telescope ever constructed by NASA was successfully launched from Earth. With unprecedented technology, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will peer both near and far, from the planets and bodies in our solar system to the deepest reaches of space, where the first stars and galaxies formed more than 13 billion years ago.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.12.2021
Wandering celestial bodies provide a glimpse into the formation of stars and planets
Wandering celestial bodies provide a glimpse into the formation of stars and planets
With observations of one of the closest star-forming regions to the sun a team of international astronomers discovered the largest population of free-floating planets. These celestial bodies do not revolve around a star and are very hard to find due to their very low brightness. The large number of planets now detected provides information about the formation process of stars and planets and important information for future research.

Astronomy / Space Science - 22.12.2021
Earth and Mars were formed from inner Solar System material
Earth and Mars were formed from inner Solar System material
Earth and Mars were formed from material that largely originated in the inner Solar System; only a few percent of the building blocks of these two planets originated beyond Jupiter's orbit. A group of researchers led by the University of Münster report these findings today in the journal "Science Advances".

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.12.2021
2021's news highlights from the Faculty of Science and Engineering
2021’s news highlights from the Faculty of Science and Engineering
Our world-leading science and engineering at The University of Manchester has been the cause of some exciting stories this year. Whether it's space, materials, or the climate, our stories have been top news across the country and the world. Here's some of the most popular and interesting news releases from the Faculty of Science and Engineering in 2021.

Chemistry - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.12.2021
Could acid-neutralising life-forms make habitable pockets in Venus' clouds?
Could acid-neutralising life-forms make habitable pockets in Venus’ clouds?
A new study shows it's theoretically possible. The hypothesis could be tested soon with proposed Venus-bound missions. If life is there, how does it propagate in an environment as dry as the clouds of Venus? Paul Rimmer It's hard to imagine a more inhospitable world than our closest planetary neighbour.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.12.2021
Turbocharged data analysis could prevent gravitational wave computing crunch
A new method of analysing the complex data from massive astronomical events could help gravitational wave astronomers avoid a looming computational crunch. Researchers from the University of Glasgow have used machine learning to develop a new system for processing the data collected from detectors like the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.12.2021
New space telescope to uncover secrets of Universe's origins
New space telescope to uncover secrets of Universe’s origins
The NASA-led James Webb Space Telescope, which includes hardware designed and built at UCL and which will image the very first stars to shine in the Universe, is scheduled to be launched into space later this month. The telescope, one of the great space observatories following Hubble, will be launched on-board the Ariane rocket from Europe's spaceport in French Guiana on or after Friday 24 December.
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