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Electroengineering - Computer Science - 26.03.2021
A Touch of Silver
Carnegie Mellon University In the field of robotics, metals offer advantages like strength, durability and electrical conductivity. But, they are heavy and rigid - properties that are undesirable in soft and flexible systems for wearable computing and human-machine interfaces. Hydrogels, on the other hand, are lightweight, stretchable and biocompatible, making them excellent materials for contact lenses and tissue engineering scaffolding.

Art and Design - Computer Science - 25.03.2021
Artist’s intent: AI recognizes emotions in visual art
A team of AI researchers has trained its algorithms to see the emotional intent behind great works of art, possibly leading to computers that see much deeper than current technologies. Researchers have built an algorithm that can capture the emotions that an image evokes. Experts in artificial intelligence have gotten quite good at creating computers that can "see" the world around them - recognizing objects, animals, and activities within their purview.

Computer Science - Physics - 23.03.2021
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
EPFL will soon be home to a European hub for high-performance computing focused on fusion power - a potential source of clean, risk-free energy. As part of this effort, EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center will lead a campus-wide, cross-disciplinary research team. EUROfusion - or the European Consortium for the Development of Fusion Energy, which consists of organizations from 28 European countries - has just selected EPFL as the site for its Advanced Computing Hub.

Computer Science - 22.03.2021
U-M computer chip pitted against 500+ hackers. The chip won
MORPHEUS technology from the University of Michigan emerged unscathed from a DARPA virtual hackathon. An "unhackable” computer chip lived up to its name in its first bug bounty competition, foiling over 500 cybersecurity researchers who were offered tens of thousands of dollars to analyze it and three other secure processor technologies for vulnerabilities.

Law - Computer Science - 19.03.2021
The importance of iconography and text: Research that impacted new privacy law
A groundbreaking law that gives consumers more agency over the sale of their private information was updated in California this week, and it reflects the work of two university teams. Additional regulations added to the California Consumer Privacy Act to include adoption of a Privacy Options icon come just as the team of researchers that helped lawmakers design the blue button get ready to share results of their research process that informed the icon design.

Computer Science - 16.03.2021
Virtual reality at your fingertips
Virtual reality at your fingertips
When a person taps with their fingers, each finger generates a different vibration profile propagating to the wrist through bones. ETH Zurich researchers have now leveraged this discovery in the development of a dual-sensor wristband that brings intuitive free-hand interaction to virtual productivity spaces.

Health - Computer Science - 15.03.2021
Machine learning models for diagnosing COVID-19 are not yet suitable for clinical use
Machine learning models for diagnosing COVID-19 are not yet suitable for clinical use
Systematic review finds that machine learning models for detecting and diagnosing COVID-19 from medical images have major flaws and biases, making them unsuitable for use in patients. However, researchers have suggested ways to remedy the problem.

Computer Science - Physics - 11.03.2021
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Artificial intelligence is part of our modern life by enabling machines to learn useful processes such as speech recognition and digital personal assistants. A crucial question for practical applications is how fast such intelligent machines can learn. An experiment at the University of Vienna has answered this question, showing that quantum technology enables a speed-up in the learning process.

Physics - Computer Science - 11.03.2021
Finding quvigints in a quantum treasure map
Finding quvigints in a quantum treasure map
Researchers have struck quantum gold—and created a new word—by enlisting machine learning to efficiently navigate a 20-dimensional quantum treasure map. Physicist Dr Markus Rambach from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQUS) at The University of Queensland said the team was able to find unknown quantum states more quickly and accurately, using a technique called self-guided tomography.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 11.03.2021
New Approach Found for Energy-Efficient AI Applications
New Approach Found for Energy-Efficient AI Applications
Researchers at TU Graz demonstrate a new design method for particularly energy-saving artificial neural networks that get by with extremely few signals and - similar to Morse code - also assign meaning to the pauses between the signals. Most new achievements in artificial intelligence (AI) require very large neural networks.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 10.03.2021
Future virtual fitting rooms
Future virtual fitting rooms
Recerca A team of the University of Barcelona and the Computer Vision Center ( CVC ) have carried out CLOTH3D, the first 3D synthetic dataset at a large scale aimed at the development of deep learning to simulate clothes on different body types.

Health - Computer Science - 09.03.2021
Alexa, do I have an irregular heart rhythm? First AI system for contactless monitoring of heart rhythm using smart speakers
Alexa, do I have an irregular heart rhythm? First AI system for contactless monitoring of heart rhythm using smart speakers
Smart speakers, such as Amazon Echo and Google Home, have proven adept at monitoring certain health care issues at home. For example, researchers at the University of Washington have shown that these devices can detect cardiac arrests or monitor babies breathing. But what about tracking something even smaller: the minute motion of individual heartbeats in a person sitting in front of a smart speaker? UW researchers have developed a new skill for a smart speaker that for the first time monitors both regular and irregular heartbeats without physical contact.

Computer Science - Environment - 08.03.2021
Assessing regulatory fairness through machine learning
Assessing regulatory fairness through machine learning
Algorithmic approaches for assessing pollution reduction policies can reveal shifts in environmental protection of minority communities, according to Stanford researchers Applying machine learning to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiative reveals how key design elements determine what communities bear the burden of pollution.

Materials Science - Computer Science - 05.03.2021
Researchers use sound to shape the future of printing
Researchers use sound to shape the future of printing
Researchers have developed a way to coax microscopic particles and droplets into precise patterns by harnessing the power of sound in air. The implications for printing, especially in the fields of medicine and electronics, are far-reaching. The scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Bath have shown that it's possible to create precise, pre-determined patterns on surfaces from aerosol droplets or particles, using computer-controlled ultrasound.

Computer Science - Health - 05.03.2021
Cardiology prepared for the fourth dimension
What if heart specialists could simulate the fitting of a new heart valve in 4D before an operation? 4D CT scanners add the dimension of time to three-dimensional images and visualise the movement of the heart in detail.

Computer Science - Psychology - 04.03.2021
Speed of expression offers vital visual cues
The speed at which we produce facial expressions plays an important role in our ability to recognise emotions in others, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. A team in the University's School of Psychology carried out research which showed that people tend to produce happy and angry expressions more rapidly, while sad expressions are produced more slowly.

Computer Science - 04.03.2021
New Optical Antennas Could Overcome Data Limits
New Optical Antennas Could Overcome Data Limits
Game-changing technology developed by Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley promises new advances for biological imaging, quantum cryptography, high-capacity communications, and sensors Adapted from UC Berkeley news release by Sarah Yang Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have found a new way to harness properties of lightwaves that can radically increase the amount of data they carry.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
Can’t solve a riddle? The answer might lie in knowing what doesn’t work
Ever get stuck trying to solve a puzzle? Say, something like this: What goes in the last box? (The answer and more puzzles are below.) You look for a pattern, or a rule, and you just can't spot it. So you back up and start over. That's your brain recognizing that your current strategy isn't working, and that you need a new way to solve the problem, according to new research from the University of Washington.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 03.03.2021
Scientists confirm third-nearest star with a planet-and it’s rocky like Earth
In the past two decades, scientists have discovered more and more planets orbiting distant stars-but in some sense, they're still just dots on a map. "It's kind of like looking at a map of Europe and seeing the dot that's labeled 'Paris,'" said University of Chicago astrophysicist Jacob Bean. "You know where it is, but there's a whole lot that you're missing about the city." Scientists are developing new telescopes and instruments to fill in more and more of that picture.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 26.02.2021
More ethical and economic model for nanoparticle toxicological studies
More ethical and economic model for nanoparticle toxicological studies
A small caterpillar, considered a plague by all beekeepers, has proved to be a great promise for biomedical research. The larvae of the Galleria mellonella species, known for the damage they cause to beehives, had been object of interest in scientific research for the last decades, specially for their utility as invertebrate models in the study of mechanisms of diseases.