news

« BACK

Earth Sciences



Results 1681 - 1700 of 1718.
« Previous 1 ... 81 82 83 84 85 ... 86 Next »


Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.04.2010
Informing Copenhagen
Informing Copenhagen
The University has several groups that are among the leaders in the field of climate change research. In the run-up to the Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, a flurry of articles was published in prestigious journals, six of which included researchers from these groups. A study in Science (12 November) reported that satellite observations and a state-of-the art regional atmospheric model independently confirmed that the Greenland ice sheet is losing mass at an accelerating rate.

Earth Sciences - 20.04.2010
NASA Satellite Helps Measure Iceland Volcanic Plume
NASA Satellite Helps Measure Iceland Volcanic Plume
NASA's Terra satellite flew directly over Iceland on April 19, 2010, allowing its Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument to capture a series of images of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano and its erupting ash plume. The left panel of this image shows a view from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera, while the right panel contains a computer-analyzed map of plume heights, which have been corrected to compensate for the effects of wind.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.04.2010
Retracing the tracks of dinosaurs reveals ecosystem the size of a continent
Retracing the tracks of dinosaurs reveals ecosystem the size of a continent
McGill researchers uncover first evidence that warm and moderate climate allowed dinosaurs to expand into one massive homogenous community across North America Researchers at McGill University are unlocking the mysteries of the little-known habits of dinosaurs in discovering that the entire western interior of North America was likely once populated by a single community of dinosaurs.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.04.2010
Scientists identify freezing times for Cretaceous dinosaurs
Scientists studying fossils and minerals from Arctic Svalbard, in Norway, have discovered evidence that the ‘greenhouse’ climate of the Cretaceous period was punctuated by a sudden drop in global temperatures. The drop is estimated to have occurred some 137 million years ago during a time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, and would have seen the islands fall from an average of 13 degrees centigrade (ocean temperature) to as low as four degrees.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.04.2010
Earthquake in Chile causes days to be longer
Since the earthquake in Chile in February 2010, the "Höhere Geodäsie" [Advanced Geodesy] research group at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) has been helping measure the earth on a global scale. First results indicate that the rotational speed of the earth has become marginally slower and days have become longer by 0.3 microseconds.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 08.04.2010
New research suggests Venus is geologically alive
New research suggests Venus is geologically alive
Based on topographic data obtained by NASA's Magellan spacecraft, this figure shows the volcanic peak Idunn Mons in the Imdr Regio area of Venus. The colored overlay shows the heat patterns derived from surface brightness data collected by VIRTIS aboard the European Space Agency's Venus Express spacecraft.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 08.04.2010
NASA-Funded Research Suggests Venus is Geologically Alive
NASA-Funded Research Suggests Venus is Geologically Alive
The observations reveal that volcanoes on Venus appeared to erupt between a few hundred years to 2.5 million years ago. This suggests the planet may still be geologically active, making Venus one of the few worlds in our solar system that has been volcanically active within the last 3 million years.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 04.04.2010
Early Earth absorbed more sunlight – no extreme greenhouse effect needed to keep water wet
Early Earth absorbed more sunlight – no extreme greenhouse effect needed to keep water wet
Researchers have long wondered why water on Earth was not frozen during the early days of the planet, when the sun emanated only 70 to 75 percent as much energy as it does today. Some theorize that high levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the same mechanism cited in global warming today, were key.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 01.04.2010
Ice sheet melt identified as trigger of Big Freeze
Ice sheet melt identified as trigger of Big Freeze
The main cause of a rapid global cooling period, known as the Big Freeze or Younger Dryas - which occurred nearly 13,000 years ago - has been identified thanks to the help of an academic at the University of Sheffield. A new paper, which is published in Nature today (1 April 2010), has identified a mega-flood path across North America which channelled melt-water from a giant ice sheet into the oceans and triggering the Younger Dryas cold snap.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 29.03.2010
UCL's role in world's largest scientific experiment
UCL’s role in world’s largest scientific experiment
UCL's Professor John Butterworth, who led the UK development of one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detectors, explains the significance of the record-breaking particle collisions achieved today. Protons collided at seven trillion volts ? the highest energies ever achieved by a man-made particle accelerator ? at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research), which houses the LHC, near Geneva.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.03.2010
Scientists find first ever southern tyrannosaur dinosaur
Scientists find first ever southern tyrannosaur dinosaur
Scientists from Cambridge, London and Melbourne have found the first ever evidence that tyrannosaur dinosaurs existed in the southern continents. They identified a hip bone found at Dinosaur Cove in Victoria, Australia as belonging to an ancestor of Tyrannosaurus rex. The find sheds new light on the evolutionary history of this group of dinosaurs.

Earth Sciences - 23.03.2010
Scientists Assess Haiti's Future Earthquake Threats
Before the Jan. 12 earthquake that leveled Port-au-Prince, the last great quake to strike Haiti was more than 150 years ago. Assessing historical seismic activity can be critical to understanding the future threat that earthquakes pose to Haiti's long-term stability and recovery. On Feb. 24, scientists from several research centers set sail to conduct a 20-day research cruise off of Haiti to examine the surrounding ocean floor for evidence of the recent earthquakes.

Health - Earth Sciences - 23.03.2010
Researchers Focus on Psychological Care for Haiti's Earthquake Survivors
In the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster, addressing the physical needs of survivors—providing emergency medical care, food and water—can make the difference between life and death. But in the weeks, months and sometimes years that follow, the mental health effects may linger well after physical wounds have healed.

Earth Sciences - Media - 23.03.2010
Columbia's Dart Center Helps Haiti's Journalists Cope With Trauma
As the world media continues to cover the aftermath of Haiti's earthquake, the country's own journalists are confronting the challenges of reporting on a disaster that has affected them both as survivors as well as witnesses. For one week in March, The Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma , based at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism , and its partner, CECOSIDA, conducted workshops with local journalists in Haiti to foster awareness about the impacts of trauma on them, their families and their audiences.

Mechanical Engineering - Earth Sciences - 15.03.2010
MIT analysis suggests wind turbines could cause temperatures to rise and fall
Turbines installed in water could cause drop in temperature; land turbines could cause rise MIT analysis suggests wind turbines could cause temperatures to rise and fall New microscopy technique offers close-up, real-time view of cellular phenomena CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? Although wind power has emerged as a viable renewable energy source in recent years ? one that proponents say could lessen the threat of global warming ? a new MIT analysis may serve to temper enthusiasm about wind power, at least at very large scales.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 07.03.2010
Dinosaurs went out with a bang, says study
Dinosaurs went out with a bang, says study
The dinosaurs died out as a result of a huge asteroid strike rather than the eruption of a super volcano, according to a study published today in the journal Science . Dr Paul Bown (UCL Earth Sciences) was part of a panel of researchers who analysed more than two decades? worth of evidence to determine the cause of the Cretaceous?Tertiary (KT) mass extinction.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

Earth Sciences - Veterinary - 04.03.2010
New Evidence Hints at Global Glaciation 716.5 Million Years Ago
Cambridge, Mass. March 4, 2010 - Geologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a “snowball Earth” event long suspected to have taken place around that time. Led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work this week in the journal Science.

Earth Sciences - 11.02.2010
Strongest evidence to date links exploration well to Lusi mud volcano
Strongest evidence to date links exploration well to Lusi mud volcano
BERKELEY — New data provide the strongest evidence to date that the world’s biggest mud volcano, which killed 13 people in 2006 and so far has displaced 30,000 people in East Java, Indonesia, was not caused by an earthquake, according to an international scientific team that includes researchers from Durham University and the University of California, Berkeley.
« Previous 1 ... 81 82 83 84 85 ... 86 Next »