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Environment - 15.06.2021
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Climate change is causing the "feminisation" of green turtle populations in far north Queensland, but a study shows seawater irrigation could potentially reverse the male drought. The research, part of the Turtle Cooling Project including The University of Queensland's Dr David Booth and PhD candidate Melissa Staines , found that a single application of seawater could theoretically create male hatchlings.

Environment - 15.06.2021
’Live fast, die young’ cycle threatening California’s ecosystems
An entire ecosystem of rare and endangered species along the streams and rivers of California is being threatened by the water management across the state, scientists have warned. In a new study published today, a team including researchers from Cardiff University has revealed the widespread and long-lasting damage that humans are inflicting by diverting water for their own needs.

Environment - Campus - 15.06.2021
Mountain fires burning higher at unprecedented rates
Forest fires have crept higher up mountains over the past few decades, scorching areas previously too wet to burn, according to researchers from McGill University. As wildfires advance uphill, a staggering 11% of all Western U.S. forests are now at risk. "Climate change and drought conditions in the West are drying out high-elevation forests, making them particularly susceptible to blazes," says lead author Mohammad Reza Alizadeha , a PhD candidate at McGill University under the supervision of Professor Jan Adamowski.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.06.2021
Climate conditions during the migration of Homo sapiens out of Africa reconstructed
Climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years from East Africa illustrates the living conditions of Homo sapiens when they migrated out of Africa / Homo sapiens was mobile across regions during wet phases and retreated to high altitudes during dry phases An international research team led by Professor Dr Frank Schäbitz has published a climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years for Ethiopia.

Environment - 14.06.2021
Dragonflies: Species Losses and Gains in Germany
Dragonflies: Species Losses and Gains in Germany
Some dragonfly and damselfly species suffer from habitat loss and degradation, while many species benefit from improved water quality and warmer climate Over the past 35 years, there have been large shifts in the distributions of many dragonfly and damselfly species in Germany. Many species of standing water habitats have declined, probably due to loss of habitat.

Environment - 14.06.2021
When hydropower plants emit carbon dioxide
When hydropower plants emit carbon dioxide
Hydropower is considered to be CO2-neutral, but certain power plants in tropical regions produce large quantities of greenhouse gases. Researchers at Eawag have now studied how much carbon dioxide escapes into the atmosphere below the Kariba Dam in southern Africa. Such previously ignored emissions must be taken into account by future carbon budgets.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.06.2021
Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor
Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor
Specialised bacteria in the oceans seafloor consume and recycle nucleic acids from dead biomass While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.

Health - Environment - 11.06.2021
Air conditioning unnecessary in majority of heatwave conditions globally
Air conditioning unnecessary in majority of heatwave conditions globally
Most of Asia, Europe, North America and South America have never experienced heatwave conditions that would prohibit electric fans from being a safe, effective and clean alternative to air conditioning, finds a new study. The biophysical modelling study, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, challenges outdated public health guidance that discourages fan use in temperatures higher than 35 degrees Celsius / 95 degrees Fahrenheit.

Environment - Chemistry - 10.06.2021
'Vegan spider silk' provides sustainable alternative to single-use plastics
’Vegan spider silk’ provides sustainable alternative to single-use plastics
Researchers have created a plant-based, sustainable, scalable material that could replace single-use plastics in many consumer products. It was a surprise to find our research could also address a big problem in sustainability: that of plastic pollution Tuomas Knowles The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, created a polymer film by mimicking the properties of spider silk, one of the strongest materials in nature.

Environment - Paleontology - 10.06.2021
Dinosaurs lived in greenhouse climate with hot summers
New climate reconstruction method provides precise picture of climate 78 million years ago Palaeoclimatologists study climate of the geological past. Using an innovative technique, new research by an international research team led by Niels de Winter (VUB-AMGC & Utrecht University) shows for the first time that dinosaurs had to deal with greater seasonal differences than previously thought.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.06.2021
Chamoli Disaster Could Happen Again
Chamoli Disaster Could Happen Again
Some four months ago, a devastating flood ravaged the Chamoli district in the Indian Himalayas, killing over 200 people. The flood was caused by a massive landslide, which also involved a glacier. Researchers at the University of Zurich, the WSL and ETH Zurich have now analyzed the causes, scope and impact of the disaster as part of an international collaboration.

Environment - Computer Science - 10.06.2021
Ocean microplastics: First global view shows seasonal changes and sources
Satellites reveal fluctuation in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and releases from the Yangtze River An estimated 8 million tons of plastic trash enters the ocean each year, and most of it is battered by sun and waves into microplastics-tiny flecks that can ride currents hundreds or thousands of miles from their point of entry The debris can harm sea life and marine ecosystems, and it's extremely difficult to track and clean up.

Environment - 09.06.2021
Origin of fairy circles: Euphorbia hypothesis disproved
Researchers led by G öttingen University examine the long-term results of an experiment from more than 40 years ago   The fairy circles of the Namib are one of nature's greatest mysteries. Millions of these circular barren patches extend over vast areas along the margins of the desert in Namibia. In 1979, G.K. Theron published the first research about their origin.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.06.2021
Research efforts to reduce pesticide contamination
Research efforts to reduce pesticide contamination
With the latest analytical methods, potentially toxic substances can be detected even at very low concentrations. However, the aim of research is not merely to document such contamination but also to understand how it occurs in streams and groundwater, and to propose mitigation measures. In agricultural areas, large volumes of water from fields, roads and paths enter streams via manholes or other artificial drainage systems.

Environment - 09.06.2021
Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
Endangered blue whales recorded off southwest coast of India
Research from the University of Washington shows that endangered blue whales are present and singing off the southwest coast of India. The results suggest that conservation measures should include this region, which is considering expanding tourism. Analysis of recordings from late 2018 to early 2020 in Lakshadweep , an archipelago of 36 low-lying islands west of the Indian state of Kerala, detected whales with a peak activity in April and May.

Environment - 07.06.2021
Experiment evaluates the effect of human decisions on climate reconstructions
Experiment evaluates the effect of human decisions on climate reconstructions
The first double-blind experiment analysing the role of human decision-making in climate reconstructions has found that it can lead to substantially different results. Scientists aren't robots, and we don't want them to be, but it's important to learn where the decisions are made and how they affect the outcome Ulf Büntgen The experiment, designed and run by researchers from the University of Cambridge, had multiple research groups from around the world use the same raw tree-ring data to reconstruct temperature changes over the past 2,000 years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.06.2021
Forest use changes life cycles of wildflowers
Forest use changes life cycles of wildflowers
One of the most striking features of global warming is that the life rhythms of plants are changing all over the world. A study at the University of Tübingen has found that human land use can also significantly influence the pace of plant life cycles. In a comparative study, a research team from the Plant Evolutionary Ecology group surveyed one hundred forest sites of different management intensities.

Environment - 07.06.2021
Researchers as bridge builders in water policy
Researchers as bridge builders in water policy
From flood protection and drinking water supply to the revitalisation of water bodies and hydropower production - water policy in Switzerland takes place in a wide variety of sectors. However, the exchange of information between politically divided players is often difficult. Science plays an important role as a bridge builder between the camps.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.06.2021
ALPALGA: the search for mountain snow microalgae
ALPALGA: the search for mountain snow microalgae
High elevation snow is home to previously unknown species of microalgae. Scientists have created the ALPALGA consortium to study this ecosystem, which is threatened by climate change. According to their initial results, these microalgae are tiered to elevation, just like herbaceous plants and trees.

Environment - Health - 04.06.2021
More than a Third of Heat Deaths Are Linked to Climate Change
More than a Third of Heat Deaths Are Linked to Climate Change
Between 1991 and 2018, more than a third of all deaths in which heat played a role were attributable to human-induced global warming, according to a new study in the Nature Climate Change journal. The study, the largest of its kind, was led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of Bern with partners including Swiss TPH.
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