news

« BACK

Environment



Results 1 - 20 of 4551.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 228 Next »


Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 15:02
Balanced diet can mitigate negative impact of pests for bumblebees
Balanced diet can mitigate negative impact of pests for bumblebees
Research team at Göttingen University investigates effects on reproductive success in agricultural landscapes Bumblebees are important pollinators because they pollinate many different plant species and are extremely resilient. They can still manage to fly at temperatures that are too cold for other pollinators.

Computer Science - Environment - 12:07
Cambridge partners with Schmidt Futures in new software engineering network
Cambridge partners with Schmidt Futures in new software engineering network
Software engineers will bridge the gap between modern science and scalable complex software at four leading universities.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11:03
Trees call for help from birds and predatory insects
Trees call for help from birds and predatory insects
Chemical 'cry for help' from trees verified in a natural habitat for the first time Life Trees emit scents when attacked by caterpillars and other herbivores. They use these to attract predatory insects and even birds, thus getting rid of their pests. This had only been demonstrated in smaller scale experiments so far.

Environment - 19.01.2022
Climate crisis drives Mediterranean coral populations to collapse
Climate crisis drives Mediterranean coral populations to collapse
A new study led by teams of the Faculty of Biology , the Biodiversity Research Institute ( IRBi o) of the UB, and the Institute of Marine Sciences ( ICM-CSIC ) of Barcelona has revealed that marine heatwaves associated with the climate crisis are bringing down the populations of coral in the Mediterranean, the biomass of which in some cases has been reduced by 80 to 90%.

Environment - Chemistry - 18.01.2022
Remove micropollutants with granular activated carbon?
Remove micropollutants with granular activated carbon?
For the elimination of trace substances at wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), granular activated carbon (GAC) is also available as an alternative treatment option to ozonation and the powdered activated carbon process (PAC). In contrast to the high energy consumption in ozonation (electrical energy to generate ozone and liquid oxygen), the energy-intensive production and CO2-footprint of carbon (starting raw materials, process energy) have an impact on activated carbon treatment.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.01.2022
Uncovering the underlying patterns in contemporary evolution
Uncovering the underlying patterns in contemporary evolution
Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or risk extinction. For more than fifty years, scientists have described instances of -rapid evolution- in specific populations as their traits (phenotypes) change in response to varying stressors. For example, Spanish clover has developed a tolerance for copper from the mine tailings in which it grows, and the horn size of Alberta bighorn sheep has decreased due to trophy hunting.

Pharmacology - Environment - 17.01.2022
Researchers use AI to analyze tweets debating vaccination and climate change
Preparing for an online start to the winter term: for more information. Analyzing roughly 87 million tweets, researchers found sentiments around climate change to be uniform, but not so for vaccination Using artificial intelligence (AI) researchers have found that between 2007 and 2016 online sentiments around climate change were uniform, but this was not the case with vaccination.

Environment - Psychology - 17.01.2022
Inciting instead of coercing, 'nudges' prove their effectiveness
Inciting instead of coercing, ’nudges’ prove their effectiveness
A team from the UNIGE demonstrates that certain soft incentive techniques, known as «nudges», are effective in getting people to change their behaviour. To get through challenges such as the pandemic or the climate change, citizens must change their habits and behaviors. But how can this be achieved without resorting to coercive measures? The answer to this question may be the «nudges» that have been gaining popularity over the last decade.

Health - Environment - 17.01.2022
Disinfecting PPE for reuse, recycling
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. Engineering prof Bill Anderson works with NZ researchers to reduce COVID-19 shortages, waste A professor at Waterloo Engineering collaborated with researchers in New Zealand on the development of a method to disinfect personal protective equipment (PPE) for reuse or recycling.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.01.2022
Genetic Strategy Reverses Insecticide Resistance
Researchers replace resistant gene with susceptible counterpart, opening the door to new methods that could fight malaria and reduce pesticide use Insecticides play a central role in efforts to counter global impacts of mosquito-spread malaria and other diseases, which cause an estimated 750,000 deaths each year.

Environment - 13.01.2022
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Swirling river waters can trap lightweight microplastics that otherwise might be expected to float - depositing them in riverbeds where it can take up to seven years to transport them just a kilometre further towards the ocean, a new study reveals.

Health - Environment - 13.01.2022
Reducing air pollution: policies that pay off
Every year in France, fine particle pollution (particles with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres 1 ) leads to the premature death of around 40,000 people. The associated cost is estimated at €100 billion per year. Despite this, public policies to combat air pollution are generally implemented without first assessing their future health and economic impacts.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.01.2022
New insights into seasons on a planet outside our solar system
New insights into seasons on a planet outside our solar system
XO-3b, a hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) Imagine being in a place where the winds are so strong that they move at the speed of sound. That's just one aspect of the atmosphere on XO-3b, one of a class of exoplanets (planets outside our solar system), known as hot Jupiters.

Environment - Chemistry - 13.01.2022
Copper-based chemicals may be contributing to ozone depletion
A copper-based fungicide known as Bourdeaux mixture is applied to vineyards to prevent downy mildew. (iStock image Copper released into the environment from fungicides, brake pads, antifouling paints on boats and other sources may be contributing significantly to stratospheric ozone depletion, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.

Environment - 12.01.2022
Fish smoking in coastal Ghana linked to high pollutant exposures, elevated health burden
Fish smoking in coastal Ghana linked to high pollutant exposures, elevated health burden
Millions of workers in coastal Africa-most of them women-spend their days preserving fish by smoking them in rudimentary, wood-fired mud ovens. University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues looked at the air pollutant exposures and health symptoms experienced by fish smokers in two coastal cities in the West African nation of Ghana.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.01.2022
How can we know how animals synchronise their behaviour?
How can we know how animals synchronise their behaviour?
Koen de Reus of VUB's Artificial Intelligence Lab and the Comparative Bioacoustics Group at Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands: "Failure of a non-human animal to synchronise in an experiment designed to test humans does not mean they are incapable of synchronising. It could also mean that the experiment was not appropriately designed to test a particular species." VUB researcher Koen de Reus is part of an international team exploring the best way to study how animals synchronise behaviours such as moving, vocalising, and breathing.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.01.2022
Concerns for animals tied to same habitats
Some wildlife are stuck in their ways. Like humans, wild animals often return to the same places to eat, walk on the same paths to travel and use the same places to raise their young. A team led by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Wyoming has reviewed the scientific literature and found that, while this -consistent- behavior may be beneficial when environmental conditions don-t change very fast, those benefits may not be realized in the ever-changing world dominated by humans.

Social Sciences - Environment - 10.01.2022
Roles, responsibilities and capacities: Theorizing space, social practice, and the relational constitution of energy demand in and beyond Manchester
In a new journal article Dr Torik Holmes introduces a novel relational-space-inspired approach for exploring how cities become energy demanding sites over time. Urban energy transitions have increasingly formed a central topic of research over the past two decades. This is, in part, because 'modern urbanised societies are massively dependent on energy' - cities are understood to account for close to '75% of global carbon dioxide emissions and 75% of energy consumption'.

Chemistry - Environment - 10.01.2022
It all comes down to the first electron
It all comes down to the first electron
Every living thing requires energy. This is also true of microorganisms. This energy is frequently generated in the cells by respiration, that is by the combustion of organic compounds, in other words: food. During this process, electrons are released which the microorganisms then need to get rid of.

Social Sciences - Environment - 06.01.2022
Indigenous communities face a higher risk of socioeconomic vulnerability due to flooding
Preparing for an online start to the winter term: for more information. Pre-existing socioeconomic vulnerability of Indigenous communities often due to colonial policies Indigenous communities are at higher risk of hardship from climate-change-caused flooding because of pre-existing socioeconomic vulnerability, a new study shows.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 228 Next »