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Environment - Chemistry - 13.05.2024
Reaction of trees to heat unravelled
Reaction of trees to heat unravelled
At temperatures above 30°C, water loss through transpiration increases in trees, while CO2 uptake decreases - even when there is enough CO2 in the atmosphere. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL were able to show this in a study conducted using a new high-tech facility.

Environment - Health - 13.05.2024
Scientists ask the public to help find mosquitoes in Scotland
We're used to seeing the humble midge around the Scottish countryside, but now scientists are asking people in Scotland to be on the lookout for mosquitoes, as new research shows they can be found in many locations across the country. Mosquito Scotland - a collaborative project between the University of Glasgow, the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR), the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) - has established a surveillance project across the country, and has been collecting data on Scottish mosquitoes for a year.

Environment - 13.05.2024
’Green grabbing’ of Brazilian public and common lands a threat
The privatisation of land for renewable energy infrastructure in Brazil is leading to the appropriation of once-public and common lands by large international corporations because of poor oversight and lack of transparency, finds a new study involving UCL researchers. The study, published in Nature Sustainability, found that land privatisation is the dominant means for solar and wind companies to secure land for their power generation infrastructure, which includes the transfer of control of formerly public and common lands to often international companies.

Environment - Innovation - 10.05.2024
When simply reusing solar panels beats recycling
When simply reusing solar panels beats recycling
Core changemakers wants to give used solar panels a second life. As the world steadily progresses towards a more sustainable future, recycling solar panels becomes increasingly relevant. However, in some cases, simply reusing old solar panels is better. CORE CHANGEMAKERS, once a student team at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and now evolving into a startup, is exploring the possibility of using old solar panels.

Environment - 09.05.2024
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are designed to ensure the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to human societies; however, only a third of these areas are capable of offering real protection on a global scale. These are the findings of a study, carried out by scientists from the CNRS 1 as part of an international research team, to be published on 9 May in Conservation Letters .

Environment - 09.05.2024
New method for quantifying ’invisible’ plastics in rivers
Current methods to count plastic pollution in rivers are insufficient and do not account for the fragments which sink below the surface, a team of scientists have warned. These 'invisible' plastic particles can be suspended below the water line or sink to the riverbed where they are potentially harmful to the ecology of the river.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.05.2024
Limited Adaptability Makes Freshwater Bacteria Vulnerable to Climate Change
Limited Adaptability Makes Freshwater Bacteria Vulnerable to Climate Change
Freshwater bacteria with small genomes frequently undergo prolonged periods of adaptive stagnation. Based on genomic analyses of samples from Lake Zurich and other European lakes, researchers at the University of Zurich uncovered specific evolutionary strategies that shape these bacteria's lifestyles.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.05.2024
Where wildlife is welcome
Where wildlife is welcome
Study on the acceptance of animals in urban environments How do city residents feel about animals in their immediate surroundings' A recent study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Jena and the Vienna University of Technology shows how different the acceptance of various wild animals in urban areas is.

Environment - Chemistry - 08.05.2024
How rising treelines can affect Alpine lakes
How rising treelines can affect Alpine lakes
An EPFL scientist along with colleagues from universities across Europe have completed the first-ever quantitative study of the changes that soil organic matter from forests can cause in high-altitude and high-latitude lakes once it's dissolved in the water Treelines are rising around the world as a result of global warming.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 08.05.2024
Heavy snowfall and rain may contribute to some earthquakes
The results suggest that climate may influence seismic activity. When scientists look for an earthquake's cause, their search often starts underground. As centuries of seismic studies have made clear, it's the collision of tectonic plates and the movement of subsurface faults and fissures that primarily trigger a temblor.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.05.2024
Study charts how north Africa’s climate changed 5,000 years ago
Climate tipping points can either result from a slow but linear development, or can "flicker" between two stable climatic states that alternate before a final, permanent transition occurs, finds a new study featuring a UCL researcher. The study, published in Nature Communications , confirms this alternating transition for the end of the African Humid Period, a time between about 14,000 and 5,000 years ago when northern Africa was much wetter, as it shifted to the pronounced aridity that is typical today.

Paleontology - Environment - 06.05.2024
Clawed animals lived in the hammer mill
Clawed animals lived in the hammer mill
From today's perspective, they look like a cross between a horse and a gorilla: clawed animals (Chalicotheriidae) had a massive body and a horse-like head; their arms were much longer than their legs and equipped with claws. They belonged to the group of odd-toed ungulates and are thus related to modern rhinoceroses, horses and tapirs.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 06.05.2024
Eating the way we do hurts us and the planet
In an age of abundance and variety in food options, are Canadians eating better than they were half a century ago' According to a recent paper by researchers at McGill University and the International Food Policy Research Institute, those relying on Canada's food supply for their dietary needs not only face deficiencies in healthier alternatives, but they also contribute to the disproportionate levels of environmental degradation caused by Canadian agricultural and food distribution policies.

Environment - Chemistry - 06.05.2024
A leap toward carbon neutrality, CO2 to methanol
Study: Electrochemical CO2 Reduction to Methanol by Cobalt Phthalocyanine: Quantifying CO2 and CO Binding Strengths and Their Influence on Methanol Production Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a catalyst material known as cobalt phthalocyanine that converts carbon dioxide-a significant driver of climate change-into renewable fuels such as methanol.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.05.2024
Ice shelves fracture under weight of meltwater lakes
Ice shelves fracture under weight of meltwater lakes
Heavy pooling meltwater can fracture ice, potentially leading to ice shelf collapse When air temperatures in Antarctica rise and glacier ice melts, water can pool on the surface of floating ice shelves, weighing them down and causing the ice to bend. Now, for the first time in the field, researchers have shown that ice shelves don't just buckle under the weight of meltwater lakes - they fracture.

Environment - 03.05.2024
Climate change threatens Mountain Meadows
Climate change threatens Mountain Meadows
Global warming leads to decline in humus Mountain meadows are unique ecosystems. A research team led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that climate change reduces the humus content as well as the nitrogen stores in the grassland soils of the Alps and disturbs the soil structure.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2024
Taking root on land
Taking root on land
Around 550 million years ago, the Earth's surface was a barren land mass surrounded by oceans. Almost all lifeforms that had evolved up to that point existed exclusively in the oceans. Then, however, the first plants made their way onto land-not only making the Earth greener but also fundamentally transforming the atmosphere, the climate and overall conditions of life on our planet.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2024
Genomes of 'star algae' shed light on origin of plants
Genomes of ’star algae’ shed light on origin of plants
International research team generates first genomes of complex closest relatives of land plants Land plants cover the surface of our planet and often tower over us. They form complex bodies with multiple organs that consist of a broad range of cell types. Developing this morphological complexity is underpinned by intricate networks of genes, whose coordinated action shapes plant bodies through various molecular mechanisms.

Health - Environment - 02.05.2024
Modeling avian influenza in Asian poultry markets
A new study involving INRAE reveals the speed at which bird flu is spreading in live poultry markets in Asia. Scientists from the One Health Poultry Hub program have modeled the spread of avian flu in these markets, integrating for the first time biological data collected in the field. They focused their study on the H9N2 avian flu virus, which is not very virulent for poultry, but represents a major risk in the spread and evolution of the disease.

Environment - Physics - 01.05.2024
Methane emissions from landfill could be turned into sustainable jet fuel in plasma chemistry leap
Methane emissions from landfill could be turned into sustainable jet fuel in plasma chemistry leap
A new plasma technique developed by researchers at the University of Sydney could help create a circular economy for waste-generated methane emissions. In a world first, University of Sydney researchers have developed a chemical process using plasma that could create sustainable jet fuel fromámethaneágas emitted from landfills, potentially creating a low-carbon aviation industry.