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Psychology - Environment - 14.07.2021
’Greta Thunberg Effect’ belies challenges for autistic community in going green
A new psychology study from researchers at the University of Bath focuses on the relationship between autism and green behaviours. Last updated on Wednesday 14 July 2021 Autistic people need extra help in going green say researchers behind a new study which argues for a more inclusive environmental agenda.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.07.2021
The life story of Earth's climate, 3 billion years in the making
The life story of Earth’s climate, 3 billion years in the making
One of Earth's greatest mysteries is how it transformed itself, ever so gradually, from a barren ball of rock into a launching pad for life. Earth scientists have spent decades piecing together the relevant clues - identifying and studying the planet's complex interplay of geological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and chemical cycles.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.07.2021
Earth's climate life story, 3 billion years in the making
Earth’s climate life story, 3 billion years in the making
One of Earth's greatest mysteries is how it transformed itself, ever so gradually, from a barren ball of rock into a launching pad for life. Earth scientists have spent decades piecing together the relevant clues - identifying and studying the planet's complex interplay of geological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and chemical cycles.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.07.2021
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Tracking future forest fires with AI As temperatures rise, the risk of devastating forest fires is increasing. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using artificial intelligence to estimate the long-term impact that an increased number of forest fires will have on forest ecosystems.

Economics / Business - Environment - 13.07.2021
New Study Looks at Effects of Clean Air Act on Power Plants
Carnegie Mellon University The Clean Air Acts of 1970 and 1963 changed America's energy industry. A new study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Montreal found that the legislation helped lead to large and persistent declines in output and productivity for U.S. fossil-fuel power plants that opened before 1963.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.07.2021
Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains
Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains
Ancient sediments from caves have already proven to preserve DNA for thousands of years. The amount of recovered sequences from environmental sediments, however, is generally low, which difficults the analyses to be performed with these sequences. A study led by Ron Pinhasi and Pere Gelabert of the University of Vienna and published in Current Biology successfully retrieved three mammalian environmental genomes from a single soil sample of 25,000 years bp obtained from the cave of Satsurblia in the Caucasus (Georgia).

Environment - 12.07.2021
Electric delivery vehicles: When, where, how they’re charged has big impact on greenhouse gas emissions
The transportation sector is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, and a lot of attention has been devoted to electric passenger vehicles and their potential to help reduce those emissions. But with the rise of online shopping and just-in-time shipping, electric delivery fleets have emerged as another opportunity to reduce the transportation sector's environmental impact.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Scientists create genetic library for mega-ecosystem in Pacific Ocean
The California Current extends nearly 2,000 miles from Canada's Vancouver Island to the middle of the Baja Peninsula in Mexico. It brings cold water from the North Pacific Ocean to the west coast of North America and is home to numerous and abundant species because of the upwelling of deep nutrient-rich waters.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 08.07.2021
Reforestation may help mitigate droughts
Reforestation may help mitigate droughts
Based on observational data from Europe, climate researchers from ETH Zurich have shown for the first time that forests lead to a rise in precipitation. Their analyses also revealed that if the available agricultural land were reforested, the amount of precipitation in Europe could increase by more than 7 percent.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Climate changed the size of our bodies and, to some extent, our brains
The average body size of humans has fluctuated significantly over the last million years and is strongly linked to temperature. Colder, harsher climates drove the evolution of larger body sizes, while warmer climates led to smaller bodies. Brain size also changed dramatically but did not evolve in tandem with body size.

Environment - 08.07.2021
CO2 storage through dead plant material
CO2 storage through dead plant material
Allowing plant residues to rot on the field is good for the climate Plants rotting in the soil are valuable for more than just compost. In fact, plant residues play a crucial role in keeping carbon in the soil, which is important for reducing the planet's CO2 emissions. This is the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and other institutions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Environment - Health - 08.07.2021
World's largest study of global climate related mortality links 5 million deaths a year to abnormal temperatures
World's largest study of global climate related mortality links 5 million deaths a year to abnormal temperatures
The study found deaths related to hot temperatures increased in all regions from 2000 to 2019, indicating that global warming due to climate change will make this mortality figure worse in the future. The international research team, led by Monash University's Professor Yuming Guo , Dr Shanshan Li , and Dr Qi Zhao from Shandong University in China - and published today in The Lancet Planetary Health - looked at mortality and temperature data across the world from 2000 to 2019, a period when global temperatures rose by 0.26C per decade.

Environment - 08.07.2021
Remotely-piloted sailboats monitor 'cold pools' in tropical environments
Remotely-piloted sailboats monitor ’cold pools’ in tropical environments
Conditions in the tropical ocean affect weather patterns worldwide. The most well-known examples are El Niño or La Niña events, but scientists believe other key elements of the tropical climate remain undiscovered. In a study recently published in Geophysical Research Letters, scientists from the University of Washington and NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory use remotely-piloted sailboats to gather data on cold air pools , or pockets of cooler air that form below tropical storm clouds.

Environment - 06.07.2021
Boosting barley production from the ground up
Researchers are taking to the skies to help see what is happening underground in a new project that aims to improve one of Australia's largest grain crops - barley. University of Queensland's Associate Professor Lee Hickey is leading a study investigating ways to optimise root systems and help barley growers improve yield stability, particularly in the dry seasons.

Environment - 06.07.2021
Is reusable always best? Comparing environmental impacts of reusable vs. single-use kitchenware
Is reusable always best? Comparing environmental impacts of reusable vs. single-use kitchenware
Many sustainability-minded consumers are moving away from single-use plastic products and turning to reusable alternatives. In the kitchen, trendy alternatives include bamboo drinking straws and beeswax sandwich wrap. Those consumers likely assume that reusables have fewer environmental impacts, but just how green are these products? University of Michigan researchers compared the lifetime environmental impacts of common kitchenware products-both single-use plastics and reusables-and uncovered some surprising and counterintuitive results.

Environment - 05.07.2021
Early humans were sheltered from worst effects of volcanic supereruption
Early humans were sheltered from worst effects of volcanic supereruption
A massive volcanic eruption in Indonesia about 74,000 years ago likely caused severe climate disruption in many areas of the globe, but early human populations were sheltered from the worst effects, suggests a new study published in the journal PNAS . Ultimately, this will help to mitigate the environmental and societal hazards from future volcanic eruptions Anja Schmidt The eruption of the Toba volcano was the largest volcanic eruption in the past two million years, but its impacts on climate and human evolution have been unclear.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 02.07.2021
Better planning can reduce the urban heat island effect
Better planning can reduce the urban heat island effect
In his PhD thesis, EPFL researcher Martí Bosch proposes a method for spatially quantifying the impact of mitigation measures - planting green spaces and using different building materials - on the urban heat island effect. During hot weather, cities are warmer than the surrounding rural areas. This well-known phenomenon - known as the urban heat island effect - is particularly acute at night when concrete and asphalt release the heat stored up during the day.

Environment - 02.07.2021
The ocean plastic sink that went away with the rivers
The ocean plastic sink that went away with the rivers
The amount of plastic discharged by rivers to our oceans and seas has been overestimated by two to three orders of magnitude. This would explain why a large volume of microplastics seems to disappear in a mysterious ocean sink.

Environment - 30.06.2021
New vegetable fat enables improvement of cholesterol-lowering products
New vegetable fat enables improvement of cholesterol-lowering products
Olive oil and other unsaturated fats are liquid, but researchers have now developed an unsaturated fat that still remains solid at room temperature. Their product can help food companies to develop healthy alternatives to existing high-fat products. Olive oil and other unsaturated fats are liquid, but KU Leuven researchers have now developed an unsaturated fat that still remains solid at room temperature.