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Environment - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Plasticity in plants supports the evolution of ecologically specialized species
Role of plasticity as a support for future adaptation depends on specific challenges species have to face as they evolve their specialized ecology / Cologne-based research team gather data for first comparative atlas of the gene expression response to stress in ecologically different plant species An international group of researchers have found out that the ability of certain plants to adapt to future environmental challenges by altering their

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2021
Eawag test with fish cells replaces animal experiments
Eawag test with fish cells replaces animal experiments
The OECD gives the green light to the fish cell line assay developed at Eawag. This paves the way for companies and authorities around the world to determine the environmental toxicology of chemicals without having to resort to animal testing. A large number of chemicals are used in everyday products, in agriculture or in industry.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 24.06.2021
Mixed cultures for a greater yield
Mixed cultures for a greater yield
What holds true for meadows would seem to apply to arable land, too: mixed cultures are more fruitful than monocultures. This was the outcome of an ETH Zurich research project led by Christian Schöb. Monocultures dominate arable land today, with vast areas given over to single elite varieties that promise a high yield.

Environment - Materials Science - 23.06.2021
Harvesting drinking water from humidity around the clock
Harvesting drinking water from humidity around the clock
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a condenser for countries where water is in short supply. Theirs is the first zero-energy solution for harvesting water from the atmosphere throughout the 24-hour daily cycle. It relies on a self-cooling surface and a special radiation shield. Fresh water is scarce in many parts of the world and must be obtained at great expense.

Environment - 22.06.2021
Severe drying of the Amazon forest
Severe drying of the Amazon forest
Amazon rain forests could be at far higher risk of extreme drought than previously thought, according to new research. An international study led by the University warns that huge areas in the eastern part of the Amazon face severe drying by the end of the century if action is not taken to curb carbon emissions.

Environment - Health - 22.06.2021
Lead from leaded petrol persists in city air despite '90s ban
Lead from leaded petrol persists in city air despite ’90s ban
Lead levels in London's atmosphere have dropped drastically since lead additives in petrol were banned, and currently meet UK air quality targets - yet airborne particles in the capital are still highly lead-enriched compared to natural background levels, a new study reveals. And similar problems could exist in Birmingham and the West Midlands, as well as other conurbations across the country.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 22.06.2021
Analysing volcanoes to predict their awakening
Analysing volcanoes to predict their awakening
Geologists have reviewed the internal and external mechanisms that trigger volcanic eruptions to better anticipate the potential signs of a future eruption. What causes an eruption? Why do some volcanoes erupt regularly, while others remain dormant for thousands of years? A team of geologists and geophysicists, led by the University of Geneva , Switzerland, has reviewed the literature on the internal and external mechanisms that lead to a volcanic eruption.

Environment - 22.06.2021
Aviation's contribution to cutting climate change likely to be small
Aviation’s contribution to cutting climate change likely to be small
Although the emissions targets for aviation are in line with the overall goals of the Paris Agreement, there is a high likelihood that the climate impact of aviation will not meet these goals, according to a new study. Aviation is an important contributor to the global economy, but contributes to climate change by creating carbon dioxide (CO2) as well as non-CO2 effects such as forming nitrogen oxides, ozone and contrailcirrus clouds, which all contribute to global warming.

Environment - 22.06.2021
Researchers team up with Callaly to discover recyclable materials for menstrual products
Researchers from the Henry Royce Institute at The University of Manchester's Sustainable Materials Innovation Hub (SMI Hub) in collaboration with Callaly are working together to find alternative sustainable materials for menstrual hygiene products to help combat the growing need for natural-renewable alternatives for plastics.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.06.2021
Worrying insights into the chemicals in plastics
Researchers examined chemicals in plastics worldwide. They found an unexpectedly high number of substances of potential concern intentionally used in everyday plastic products. A lack of transparency limits management of these chemicals. Plastic is practical, cheap and incredibly popular. Every year, more than 350 million tonnes are produced worldwide.

Environment - History / Archeology - 21.06.2021
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Current research shows that environmental pollution is a phenomenon found not only in modern times. Even in ancient times people suffered from lead poisoning. The Romans widely used this heavy metal as a material for their water pipes and sometimes even for sweetening wine. There is a fair amount of evidence for the extent and the influence of this contamination, and its impact on the global atmosphere can be tracked on the basis of Arctic ice core analyses.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.06.2021
Smaller bodies, longer wings, earlier migrations: Untangling the multiple impacts of climate warming on birds
Smaller bodies, longer wings, earlier migrations: Untangling the multiple impacts of climate warming on birds
When a University of Michigan-led research team reported last year that North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades and that their wings have gotten a bit longer, the scientists wondered if they were seeing the fingerprint of earlier spring migrations. Multiple studies have demonstrated that birds are migrating earlier in the spring as the world warms.

Health - Environment - 18.06.2021
Climate change linked to longer allergy season in Bay Area, Stanford study finds | News Center | Stanford Medicine
Air levels of pollen and mold spores in the San Francisco Bay Area are elevated for about two more months per year than in past decades, and higher temperatures are to blame, a study has found. Bay Area allergy sufferers take note: Climate change has lengthened the local pollen and mold season by eight to nine weeks per year during the past two decades, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 18.06.2021
Scientists detect signatures of life remotely
Scientists detect signatures of life remotely
It could be a milestone on the path to detecting life on other planets: Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bern and of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS detect a key molecular property of all living organisms from a helicopter flying several kilometers above ground.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
Silent witnesses
Silent witnesses
Once of interest only to enthusiasts, ETH Zurich's Entomological Collection now offers researchers a treasure trove of hidden knowledge.   Four tightly closed doors protect the Entomological Collection of ETH Zurich from heat and daylight. The cold, dry air is the perfect environment for the two million insects that call these specimen drawers home - although it's not particularly comfortable for their human keepers.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
At-risk species of freshwater fish reintroduced to Scotland’s lochs
An at-risk species of fish has established itself in lochs across Scotland with the help of conservation managers and by rapidly adapting to its new environment, resulting in changes to their DNA, their ecology, and body shape, according to a new study. In an urgent bid to conserve the freshwater powan species of fish, scientists introduced eggs and fish to new loch sites across Scotland over the past 30 years, with the aim of establishing new and robust populations.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
New research brings age of 65m-year-old meteorite impact into sharper focus
New research into one of the most volatile periods in Earth's geological history has narrowed down the precise age of a meteorite impact in the Ukraine around 65 million years ago, ruling out the chance that it contributed to the extinction of the dinosaurs but offering new insight into the planet's climate history.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.06.2021
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Bacteria from an Indian landfill could help eliminate contaminated chemicals. The focus is on pesticides such as lindane or brominated flame retardants, which accumulate in nature and in food chains. Researchers at Empa and Eawag used these bacteria to generate enzymes that can break down these dangerous chemicals.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.06.2021
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Nitrogen from agriculture, vehicle emissions and industry is endangering butterflies in Switzerland. The element is deposited in the soil via the air and has an impact on vegetation - to the detriment of the butterflies, as researchers at the University of Basel have discovered. More than half of butterfly species in Switzerland are considered to be at risk or potentially at risk.

Environment - Campus - 17.06.2021
'Doomsday Glacier' may be more stable than initially feared
’Doomsday Glacier’ may be more stable than initially feared
The world's largest ice sheets may be in less danger of sudden collapse than previously predicted, according to new findings led by the University of Michigan. The study, published in Science, included simulating the demise of West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, one of the world's largest and most unstable glaciers.