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Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.06.2010
NASA Radar Images Show How Mexico Quake Deformed Earth
NASA Radar Images Show How Mexico Quake Deformed Earth
PASADENA, Calif. NASA has released the first-ever airborne radar images of the deformation in Earth's surface caused by a major earthquake - the magnitude 7.2 temblor that rocked Mexico's state of Baja California and parts of the American Southwest on April 4. The data reveal that in the area studied, the quake moved the Calexico, Calif., region in a downward and southerly direction up to 80 centimeters (31 inches).

Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.06.2010
No Longer Anchored, Antarctic Ice Stream Surges to Sea
Satellite tracking has shown that the Pine Island Glacier, one of Antarctica's largest ice streams, is accelerating and thus contributing a growing share of the melt water raising sea levels worldwide. A team of scientists visiting the region last year discovered one reason for the speed-up: warm ocean water eating away at the glacier's base has lifted the ice off a rocky underwater ridge that once slowed the glacier's advance into the sea.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.06.2010
No Longer Anchored, Antarctic Glacier Surges to Sea
Satellite tracking has shown that the Pine Island Glacier, one of Antarctica's largest ice streams, is accelerating and thus contributing a growing share of the melt water raising sea levels worldwide. A team of scientists visiting the region last year discovered one reason for the speed-up: warm ocean water eating away at the glacier's base has lifted the ice off a rocky underwater ridge that once slowed the glacier's advance into the sea.

Environment - 22.06.2010
When the talking stops
When the talking stops
From the collapse of the Doha Development Agenda to the ongoing impasse over climate change, the failure of governments to achieve real progress at the international negotiating table happens with depressing regularity. Now a new study suggests that one of the reasons why so many diplomatic discussions end up in a state of deadlock could be because most politicians are looking at the problem the wrong way round.

Environment - 21.06.2010
UK science spotlights ocean acidification
Two researchers at the University of Plymouth, have been awarded over £200, 000 to investigate how marine animals might, or might not, evolve to cope with living in a warm, high CO2 ocean. One of the first six projects to be funded by the UK’s first research programme to investigate the impacts of ocean acidification Professor John Spicer and Piero Calosi will work together with colleagues from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory to assess the impacts of ocean acidification on seabed ecosystems.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2010
Exposure to flame retardants linked to changes in thyroid hormones
Exposure to flame retardants linked to changes in thyroid hormones
BERKELEY — Pregnant women with higher blood levels of a common flame retardant had altered thyroid hormone levels, a result that could have implications for fetal health, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. "This is the first study with a sufficient sample size to evaluate the association between PBDE flame retardants and thyroid function in pregnant women," said the study’s lead author, Jonathan Chevrier, a UC Berkeley researcher in epidemiology and in environmental health sciences.

Environment - 21.06.2010
Leading scientist forces climate article apology and retraction
Leading scientist forces climate article apology and retraction
An attack by the Sunday Times on the veracity of climate change research has been withdrawn, with an apology, following a complaint by rainforest expert Dr Simon Lewis from the University of Leeds. In January, the Sunday Times claimed that UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) had issued 'unsubstantiated' and 'bogus' threats about the vulnerability of the Amazonian rainforest to droughts caused by climate change.

Environment - History / Archeology - 20.06.2010
Turkish delight for scientists who discover a new type of algae
It is less than one hundredth of a millimetre in diameter and has a delicately sculptured silica shell – meet Clipeoparvus anatolicus, a microscopic alga of a diatom genus previously unknown to scientists. Discovered by academics from the University of Plymouth in a crater lake in Turkey, the diatom was also found preserved in sediments dating back more than 1,500 years.

Environment - Chemistry - 18.06.2010
New research centre set to revolutionise waterway pollution management in Victoria
Victoria's inland waterway and estuary health will be the focus of a research centre launched this week by Gavin Jennings, Victoria's Minister for Environment, Climate Change and Innovation. The launch of this centre could not have come at a better time as the condition of nearly 80 per cent of Victoria's waterways is severely declining.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.06.2010
Giant steps help hungry fish to find food
Hungry sharks, swordfish and other ocean predators have adopted different hunting behaviours depending on how much food is readily available. They use at least two particular methods to detect their next meal, according to research published online this week in Nature . An international research team, led by Professor David Sims of the Marine Biological Association Laboratory in Plymouth, UK, attached electronic tags to 55 individual fish from 14 different species of shark, tuna, billfish and ocean sunfish.

Physics - Environment - 16.06.2010
Call for Media: ESA’s Living Planet Symposium, Bergen, 28 June 2 July
Call for Media: ESA's Living Planet Symposium, Bergen, 28 June'2 July . The media are invited to ESA's largest scientific event of the year: the Living Planet Symposium, in Bergen, Norway. The symposium covers all areas of Earth observation, highlighting the results and ESA's planned missions, as well as bringing together the key scientists and decision-makers worldwide.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.06.2010
Exotic Henslow Crabs in North Sea
Climate change has led to masses of bizarre swimming crabs invading the North Sea - hundreds of miles from their usual home, new research has revealed. The exotic Henslow swimming crabs have moved from the warm seas off Portugal to the increasingly comfortable waters off Britain's east coast. Experts made the discovery while investigating an increase of the planktonic larvae of North Sea decapods - the microscopic offspring of shrimps and crabs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.06.2010
World's oldest fig wasp fossil proves that if it works, don't change it
World’s oldest fig wasp fossil proves that if it works, don’t change it
The fossil wasp is almost identical to the modern species, proving that this tiny but specialised insect has remained virtually unchanged for over 34 million years. The fossil isn't a new find but was wrongly identified as an ant when it was first discovered in the 1920s. Fig wasp expert at the University of Leeds, Dr Steve Compton, was called in to study the fossil when the late Dr Mikhail Kozlov spotted the mistake during research at the Natural History Museum, London into the flora and fauna of the Isle of Wight.

Environment - 15.06.2010
Polar scientists herald importance of satellite observations
Polar scientists herald importance of satellite observations 15 June 2010 As Arctic sea-ice recedes inexorably towards another record summer minimum, scientists have highlighted the exceptional contribution that satellites have made to the International Polar Year and charting the effects of climate change.

Environment - 14.06.2010
World's oldest leather shoe found in Armenia
World’s oldest leather shoe found in Armenia
A perfectly preserved shoe, 1,000 years older than the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt and 400 years older than Stonehenge in the UK, has been found in a cave in Armenia. The Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit at the University of Oxford dated the shoe at 5,500 years old, determining it to be the oldest leather shoe in the world.

Environment - 06.06.2010
East African Human Ancestors Lived in Hot Environments, Says Caltech-led Team
PASADENA, Calif.—East Africa's Turkana Basin has been a hot savanna region for at least the past 4 million years—including the period of time during which early hominids evolved in this area—says a team of researchers led by scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

Environment - 03.06.2010
NASA Rover Finds Clue to Mars' Past and Environment for Life
NASA Rover Finds Clue to Mars’ Past and Environment for Life
PASADENA, Calif. Rocks examined by NASA's Spirit Mars Rover hold evidence of a wet, non-acidic ancient environment that may have been favorable for life. Confirming this mineral clue took four years of analysis by several scientists. An outcrop that Spirit examined in late 2005 revealed high concentrations of carbonate, which originates in wet, near-neutral conditions, but dissolves in acid.

Environment - 02.06.2010
NASA Images Show Oil's Invasion Along Louisiana Coast
NASA Images Show Oil’s Invasion Along Louisiana Coast
These images, acquired on May 24, 2010 by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, show the encroachment of oil from the former Deepwater Horizon rig into Louisiana's wildlife habitats. The source of the spill is located off the southeastern (bottom right) edge of the images.

Environment - 01.06.2010
Demand for daily travel has peaked
Demand for daily travel has peaked
In the UK we each travel an annual 7,000 miles in the course of our daily routines - a distance equivalent to a return trip from London to New York. It has been assumed that if our finances allowed, we would travel even further in search of a greater choice of schools, shops and places of work. However, a new paper from the UCL Centre for Transport Studies shows that demand for routine 'daily travel' has already reached saturation point.

Environment - Linguistics / Literature - 01.06.2010
Count your chickens (and robins and pigeons...), urge researchers working to protect birds
Count your chickens (and robins and pigeons...), urge researchers working to protect birds
People could help to prevent species of birds from becoming extinct by recording sightings of all kinds of birds online, including common species, according to a new study published today in PLoS Biology . The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London, are urging the public to become 'citizen scientists' to help prevent today's common bird species from becoming threatened tomorrow.