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Chemistry - Environment - 22.06.2021
Worrying insights into the chemicals in plastics
Researchers examined chemicals in plastics worldwide. They found an unexpectedly high number of substances of potential concern intentionally used in everyday plastic products. A lack of transparency limits management of these chemicals. Plastic is practical, cheap and incredibly popular. Every year, more than 350 million tonnes are produced worldwide.

Environment - History / Archeology - 21.06.2021
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Environmental pollution as far back as antiquity: Finds in the ancient city of Jerash provide evidence of heavy metal contamination
Current research shows that environmental pollution is a phenomenon found not only in modern times. Even in ancient times people suffered from lead poisoning. The Romans widely used this heavy metal as a material for their water pipes and sometimes even for sweetening wine. There is a fair amount of evidence for the extent and the influence of this contamination, and its impact on the global atmosphere can be tracked on the basis of Arctic ice core analyses.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.06.2021
Smaller bodies, longer wings, earlier migrations: Untangling the multiple impacts of climate warming on birds
Smaller bodies, longer wings, earlier migrations: Untangling the multiple impacts of climate warming on birds
When a University of Michigan-led research team reported last year that North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades and that their wings have gotten a bit longer, the scientists wondered if they were seeing the fingerprint of earlier spring migrations. Multiple studies have demonstrated that birds are migrating earlier in the spring as the world warms.

Health - Environment - 18.06.2021
Climate change linked to longer allergy season in Bay Area, Stanford study finds | News Center | Stanford Medicine
Air levels of pollen and mold spores in the San Francisco Bay Area are elevated for about two more months per year than in past decades, and higher temperatures are to blame, a study has found. Bay Area allergy sufferers take note: Climate change has lengthened the local pollen and mold season by eight to nine weeks per year during the past two decades, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 18.06.2021
Scientists detect signatures of life remotely
Scientists detect signatures of life remotely
It could be a milestone on the path to detecting life on other planets: Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bern and of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS detect a key molecular property of all living organisms from a helicopter flying several kilometers above ground.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
Silent witnesses
Silent witnesses
Once of interest only to enthusiasts, ETH Zurich's Entomological Collection now offers researchers a treasure trove of hidden knowledge.   Four tightly closed doors protect the Entomological Collection of ETH Zurich from heat and daylight. The cold, dry air is the perfect environment for the two million insects that call these specimen drawers home - although it's not particularly comfortable for their human keepers.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
At-risk species of freshwater fish reintroduced to Scotland’s lochs
An at-risk species of fish has established itself in lochs across Scotland with the help of conservation managers and by rapidly adapting to its new environment, resulting in changes to their DNA, their ecology, and body shape, according to a new study. In an urgent bid to conserve the freshwater powan species of fish, scientists introduced eggs and fish to new loch sites across Scotland over the past 30 years, with the aim of establishing new and robust populations.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.06.2021
New research brings age of 65m-year-old meteorite impact into sharper focus
New research into one of the most volatile periods in Earth's geological history has narrowed down the precise age of a meteorite impact in the Ukraine around 65 million years ago, ruling out the chance that it contributed to the extinction of the dinosaurs but offering new insight into the planet's climate history.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.06.2021
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Bacteria from an Indian landfill could help eliminate contaminated chemicals. The focus is on pesticides such as lindane or brominated flame retardants, which accumulate in nature and in food chains. Researchers at Empa and Eawag used these bacteria to generate enzymes that can break down these dangerous chemicals.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.06.2021
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Nitrogen from agriculture, vehicle emissions and industry is endangering butterflies in Switzerland. The element is deposited in the soil via the air and has an impact on vegetation - to the detriment of the butterflies, as researchers at the University of Basel have discovered. More than half of butterfly species in Switzerland are considered to be at risk or potentially at risk.

Environment - Campus - 17.06.2021
'Doomsday Glacier' may be more stable than initially feared
’Doomsday Glacier’ may be more stable than initially feared
The world's largest ice sheets may be in less danger of sudden collapse than previously predicted, according to new findings led by the University of Michigan. The study, published in Science, included simulating the demise of West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, one of the world's largest and most unstable glaciers.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.06.2021
Most rivers run dry - now and then
A new study led by researchers from McGill University and INRAE found that between 51-60% of the 64 million kilometres of rivers and streams on Earth that they investigated stop flowing periodically, or run dry for part of the year. It is the first-ever empirically grounded effort to quantify the global distribution of non-perennial rivers and streams.

Environment - 15.06.2021
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Climate change is causing the "feminisation" of green turtle populations in far north Queensland, but a study shows seawater irrigation could potentially reverse the male drought. The research, part of the Turtle Cooling Project including The University of Queensland's Dr David Booth and PhD candidate Melissa Staines , found that a single application of seawater could theoretically create male hatchlings.

Environment - Electroengineering - 15.06.2021
One Thing Leads to Another
Carnegie Mellon University Novel methods for making ceramics could abate environmental problems Last year, as the pandemic roiled through academia, B. Reeja Jayan quietly contemplated how to manufacture new ceramic materials that could mitigate environmental problems. Jayan is an associate mechanical engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and her novel approaches to ceramics research has made her contemporaries take note.

Environment - 15.06.2021
’Live fast, die young’ cycle threatening California’s ecosystems
An entire ecosystem of rare and endangered species along the streams and rivers of California is being threatened by the water management across the state, scientists have warned. In a new study published today, a team including researchers from Cardiff University has revealed the widespread and long-lasting damage that humans are inflicting by diverting water for their own needs.

Environment - Campus - 15.06.2021
Mountain fires burning higher at unprecedented rates
Forest fires have crept higher up mountains over the past few decades, scorching areas previously too wet to burn, according to researchers from McGill University. As wildfires advance uphill, a staggering 11% of all Western U.S. forests are now at risk. "Climate change and drought conditions in the West are drying out high-elevation forests, making them particularly susceptible to blazes," says lead author Mohammad Reza Alizadeha , a PhD candidate at McGill University under the supervision of Professor Jan Adamowski.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.06.2021
Climate conditions during the migration of Homo sapiens out of Africa reconstructed
Climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years from East Africa illustrates the living conditions of Homo sapiens when they migrated out of Africa / Homo sapiens was mobile across regions during wet phases and retreated to high altitudes during dry phases An international research team led by Professor Dr Frank Schäbitz has published a climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years for Ethiopia.

Environment - 14.06.2021
Dragonflies: Species Losses and Gains in Germany
Dragonflies: Species Losses and Gains in Germany
Some dragonfly and damselfly species suffer from habitat loss and degradation, while many species benefit from improved water quality and warmer climate Over the past 35 years, there have been large shifts in the distributions of many dragonfly and damselfly species in Germany. Many species of standing water habitats have declined, probably due to loss of habitat.

Environment - 14.06.2021
When hydropower plants emit carbon dioxide
When hydropower plants emit carbon dioxide
Hydropower is considered to be CO2-neutral, but certain power plants in tropical regions produce large quantities of greenhouse gases. Researchers at Eawag have now studied how much carbon dioxide escapes into the atmosphere below the Kariba Dam in southern Africa. Such previously ignored emissions must be taken into account by future carbon budgets.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.06.2021
Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor
Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor
Specialised bacteria in the oceans seafloor consume and recycle nucleic acids from dead biomass While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.