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Health - Life Sciences - 24.09.2021
New cause of inherited heart condition discovered
A UCL-led research team has identified a new gene as a cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an inherited heart condition affecting one in 500 people. The discovery, published in the European Heart Journal , provides a new causal explanation for 1-2% of adults with the condition.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.09.2021
Detecting dementia in the blood
Detecting dementia in the blood
Empa researcher Peter Nirmalraj wants to image proteins with unprecedented precision - and thus gain insights into the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's. This should pave the way for an earlier diagnosis of the dementia disorder via a simple blood test. Together with neurologists from the Kantonsspital St.Gallen, a successful pilot study has now been completed.

Social Sciences - Health - 23.09.2021
Child abuse and neglect linked to early death in adulthood
Children who experience sexual or physical abuse or are neglected are more likely to die prematurely as adults, according to a new study analysing data from the 1950s to the present by researchers at UCL and the University of Cambridge. The study, published in BMJ Open , found that adults who reported experiencing sexual abuse by the age of 16 had a 2.6 times higher risk of dying in middle age - that is, between 45 and 58 - than those who did not report sexual abuse.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.09.2021
Setting global targets could cut impact of diabetes in developing countries
Setting global targets could cut impact of diabetes in developing countries
Setting and achieving targets for treating diabetes patients with cholesterol or blood pressure medication, as well as tackling blood sugar levels, could save lives and reduce healthy-lifetime lost due to diabetes in developing countries, a new global study reveals. Some 80% of people with diabetes live in Lowand Middle-income Countries (LMICs).

Health - 22.09.2021
Getting tested for COVID-19 and reporting your results
Getting tested for COVID-19 and reporting your results helps to reduce the spread of the virus. It also helps to protect those who could get seriously ill if they catch the virus. To keep our community as safe as possible, you should test yourself twice a week for COVID-19 even if you don't have symptoms.

Health - Environment - 22.09.2021
Poorly Circulated Room Air Raises Potential Exposure to Contaminants by up to 6 Times
Poorly Circulated Room Air Raises Potential Exposure to Contaminants by up to 6 Times
Berkeley Lab experiments quantify the effects of overhead heating on room air mixing with implications for COVID-safe meetings and classrooms Berkeley Lab researcher Chelsea Preble helped conduct experiments on the movement of indoor air contaminants. Here she is controlling the aerosol emissions device in a room configured like classroom.

Health - 22.09.2021
Mask up, and make ’em tight
Rice engineers help show SARS-CoV-2 getting better at spreading through breath A loose-fitting mask may be doing you no favors if you're around SARS-CoV-2. The virus that causes COVID-19 is evolving to spread more efficiently through aerosols - that is, through people's breath. That makes tighter-fitting masks and better ventilation musts, according to a study by scientists at Rice University and their colleagues.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.09.2021
Breast cancers: ruptures in cell nuclei promotes tumor invasion
Breast cancers: ruptures in cell nuclei promotes tumor invasion
Cell nuclei protect the DNA. Nuclei can rupture when cells are deformed, causing DNA damage. In the case of breast cancer, this damage makes tumour cells more invasive, with increased risk of metastasis. When cells multiply and migrate, they can be compressed and their nucleus may break open. This phenomenon causes DNA damage.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.09.2021
Pioneering EEG test could dramatically increase early diagnosis of Alzheimer's
Pioneering EEG test could dramatically increase early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s
A two-minute passive-test that measures people's brain waves in response to a series of images, 'Fastball EEG', could help expand early dementia diagnosis. Last updated on Tuesday 21 September 2021 A simple but revolutionary approach to early Alzheimer's diagnosis is being pioneered by researchers through an initiative that could pave the way for improved outcomes for individuals who develop the disease in the future.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2021
Primate neurons have fewer synapses than mice in visual cortex
UChicago, Argonne study finds mouse neurons have two to five times more synapses Primates are generally considered "smarter" than mice. But in a surprising finding, neuroscience researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that mice actually have more synapses connecting the neurons in their brains.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.09.2021
World first: Monash researchers identify potential cause and treatment for obesity and insulin resistance
Monash researchers have shown for the first time that mesenteric (gut) lymphatic dysfunction is a potential cause of and therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. The ground-breaking study identified a profoundly damaging cycle in which a high fat diet promotes dysfunction of the mesenteric lymphatics, that in turn leads to accumulation of abdominal fat.

Health - Social Sciences - 20.09.2021
Therapy with babies boosts social development, reducing clinical autism diagnosis by two-thirds
This Australian study trialled a parent-mediated therapy, iBASIS-VIPP, which was developed by the study's UK collaborators, led by Professor Jonathan Green from The University of Manchester. The use of iBASIS-VIPP reduced clinician autism diagnoses at age three by two-thirds. This is the first evidence that a pre-emptive intervention during infancy can lead to a significant reduction in the social communication difficulties characteristic of autism, and reduced likelihood of a clinician autism diagnosis in early childhood.

Health - Campus - 20.09.2021
UCLA receives $13 million contract to expand COVID-19 testing
A new $13.3 million contract from the National Institutes of Health's Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics initiative, or RADx, will enable the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to expand its capacity to process COVID-19 tests. UCLA's diagnostic laboratory will be able to process up to 150,000 COVID-19 tests per day using SwabSeq, a sequencing technology developed at UCLA.

Social Sciences - Health - 20.09.2021
Autistic individuals are more likely to be LGBTQ+ | University of Cambridge
Autistic individuals are more likely to be LGBTQ+ | University of Cambridge
New research from the suggests that autistic individuals are less likely to identify as heterosexual and more likely to identify with a diverse range of sexual orientations than non-autistic individuals. The findings have important implications for the healthcare and support of autistic individuals. The results are published in the journal Autism Research .

Pharmacology - Health - 20.09.2021
New drug shows promise in slowing growth of bowel cancer
A new drug has shown promise in slowing the regrowth of tumours among some bowel cancer patients, according to new findings of a major trial run by researchers at UCL in collaboration with Oxford, Leeds and Cardiff universities. The results of the FOCUS4-C trial, which was funded by Cancer Research UK, the EME Programme - an MRC/NIHR partnership - and AstraZeneca, will be presented on Saturday (18 September) at the European Society of Medical Oncology and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology .

Health - Pharmacology - 20.09.2021
New Covid-19 treatment for patients with diabetes shows early promise
A new Covid-19 treatment for people with diabetes has shown promising results in a trial led by UCL researchers. The trial was conducted by St George Street Capital (SGSc) - a medical research charity - with the the goal to find new purposes, where there is a real clinical need, for drugs that have already passed safety checks Professors John Martin (UCL Division of Medicine) and Pete Coffey (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology) founded the charity along with an American philanthropist to trial new medicines four years ago.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.09.2021
Gut microbe signatures may indicate adverse reaction to cancer treatments
Researchers studied a group of patients who were being treated for advanced melanoma with immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) - the main immunotherapy drugs currently used to treat cancer - to identify biomarkers of response and toxicity. They found that higher levels of the bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis in the gut were associated with a greater likelihood of developing moderate to severe treatment-related side effects.

Health - Campus - 20.09.2021
Dangers of smoking during pregnancy
Mothers who smoke are more likely to deliver smaller babies even after a full-term pregnancy, increasing the risks of birth defects and neurological disorders later in life, say researchers from McGill University. The team of researchers, which includes Assistant Professor Michael Dahan and Ido Feferkorn of the McGill University Health Care Center, examined the effects of smoking on more than nine million deliveries in the Unites States over 11 years, one of the largest studies to date.

Health - 20.09.2021
COVID triage standards may worsen racial disparities in treatment
During the crush of the COVID-19 pandemic, overwhelmed doctors and nurses in some places have had to make agonizing decisions about which patients should receive scarce health care resources. However, two Yale-led research studies suggest that a standard measurement designed to help predict which patients have the best chances of survival - and who therefore should receive treatment - could promote racial disparities of treatment outcomes.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.09.2021
New drug shows promise in slowing growth of bowel cancer
A new drug has shown promise in slowing the regrowth of tumours among some bowel cancer patients, according to new findings of a major trial run by researchers at UCL in collaboration with the Universities of Glasgow, Oxford, Leeds and Cardiff. The results of the FOCUS4-C trial, which was funded by Cancer Research UK, the EME Programme - an MRC/NIHR partnership - and AstraZeneca, will be presented on Saturday (18 September) at the European Society of Medical Oncology and published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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