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Life Sciences - Health - 15.07.2022
Elephant genes could hold the key to avoiding cancers
Elephant genes could hold the key to avoiding cancers
Scientists modelling the cancer-suppressing p53 gene identify how the 20 different molecules unique to elephants get activated for increased sensitivity and response against carcinogenic conditions - with implications for cancer treatments in humans. Scientists from seven research institutions including the University of Oxford and the University of Edinburgh have used pioneering bioinformatic modelling to investigate the molecular interactions of the p53 protein known to give protection against cancers.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.07.2022
New study evaluates pharmacological treatment for insomnia
Two drugs, eszopiclone and lemborexant - both not currently licenced for the treatment of insomnia in the UK - were shown to perform better than others, both in the acute and long-term treatment of insomnia in adults, according to a new Oxford study exploring the pharmacological management of insomnia.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2022
Sore throats suck. Do throat lozenges help at all?
Sore throats suck. Do throat lozenges help at all?
It's hard to get through a winter without suffering sore throat, but luckily they normally get better within a few days. Sore throat is a common symptom of COVID and its newer variants. And of course, many sore throats are caused by viral colds or flu, so they can be treated at home. The most common treatment is probably throat lozenges - but do they really work any better than sucking on a hard lolly? Why does my throat hurt so much? A sore throat can fall anywhere between slight discomfort to a sensation of "swallowing razor blades".

Health - Life Sciences - 15.07.2022
Diabetes: a step closer to a life without insulin
Diabetes: a step closer to a life without insulin
A team from the University of Geneva reveals how the S100A9 protein improves metabolism of insulin-dependent diabetics by avoiding the deleterious effects of insulin. People with a severe form of diabetes, where the beta cells of the pancreas do not produce or no longer produce enough insulin, have no choice but to inject themselves regularly with artificial insulin in order to survive.

Health - Chemistry - 15.07.2022
Reverse engineering the heart: University of Toronto researchers create bioartificial left ventricle
Reverse engineering the heart: University of Toronto researchers create bioartificial left ventricle
University of Toronto researchers in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering have grown a small-scale model of a human left heart ventricle in the lab. The bioartificial tissue construct is made with living heart cells and beats strongly enough to pump fluid inside a bioreactor. In the human heart, the left ventricle is the one that pumps freshly oxygenated blood into the aorta, and from there into the rest of the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.07.2022
Early life infection increases sensitivity to pain in newborn babies
Early life infection increases sensitivity to pain in newborn babies
Researchers from Oxford's Department of Paediatrics have discovered that infection can increase a baby's sensitivity to pain, which may last longer than the infection. In a new study published in Nature Communications , researchers observed 65 newborn babies who had received a standard heel-prick blood test to look for signs of potential infection.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.07.2022
Discovery boosts hopes of preventing Type I diabetes
Discovery boosts hopes of preventing Type I diabetes
Australian researchers may be a step closer to preventing Type 1 diabetes after identifying a crucial protein that could prevent the autoimmune disease from taking hold. University of Queensland and Mater researchers have developed a biological agent, sRAGE, that boosts white blood cell function which is damaged in individuals who develop Type 1 diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.07.2022
Established drug for symptoms of angina pectoris also protects vascular system
A drug used in the clinical treatment of angina symptoms also has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces atherosclerotic plaques in blood vessels - thereby reducing the risk of heart attack or stroke. The study, led by MedUni Vienna and including access to data from Harvard Medical School, has now been published in the highly regarded journal "PNAS".

Health - Innovation - 14.07.2022
The Right Environment for Fighting Cancer
The Right Environment for Fighting Cancer
Cancer immunotherapy is a successful form of treatment in oncology, but it doesn't work for every patient. One problem may be the lack of a specific type of immune cell in the tumor, researchers in the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel have found. The researchers were able to partially replace the cell's function using a signaling molecule.

Health - Environment - 14.07.2022
Even low levels of air pollution contribute to increased health risk
Even low levels of air pollution contribute to increased health risk
Science, Health & Technology Brett Goldhawk Levels of air pollution well below national and international air quality guidelines are associated with an increased risk of death, according to a new Canada-wide study led by researchers at the University of British Columbia. The study , published today in a Health Effects Institute (HEI) report, provides an in-depth analysis of air pollution levels across Canada and their relationship with mortality.

Health - 14.07.2022
Lung screenings paired with phone-based smoking cessation programs could save lives, money
Integrating telephone-based smoking cessation and lung screening programs not only have the potential to maximize long-term health benefits, but they can also be cost-effective in the long term, according to a University of Michigan-led study.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2022
New metabolic profile in patients with acute myeloid leukemia
New metabolic profile in patients with acute myeloid leukemia
An article published in the journal Nature Communications describes a specific metabolic adaptation in some patients with acute myeloid leukemia affected by tandem mutations in the FLT3 gene.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.07.2022
Towards a New Drug Class in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
Towards a New Drug Class in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Developing new drugs to help better treat its underlying causes is therefore a research priority. In a new study coordinated by Inserm researcher Vincent Marion in collaboration with the University of Birmingham (UK), Monash University (Australia), and along with Alexander Fleming, former senior endocrinologist the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the scientists have developed PATAS, a peptide that is part of a new class of antidiabetic drugs.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2022
TBE: activation mechanism of flaviviruses identified
A collaboration between researchers at the Center for Virology of the Medical University of Vienna and the Pasteur Institute in Paris has provided unexpected insights into the atomic interactions of the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus in infected cells. In particular, the researchers identified a new molecular switch that is used to control the processes of virus assembly, virus maturation and entry into new cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2022
New chemical biological tools to monitor Parkinson's disease
New chemical biological tools to monitor Parkinson’s disease
Researchers are a step closer to understanding how Parkinson's disease develops and progresses thanks to chemical biological tools developed at Simon Fraser University. New research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, and spearheaded by SFU researchers Matthew Deen and Yanping Zhu, outlines new technology and methods to measure the activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCase), an enzyme that is commonly linked to Parkinson's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.07.2022
How gut microbes can evolve and become dangerous
Gut microbes have been linked to both good health and the promotion of diseases such as autoimmune disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases, metabolic syndrome, and even neuropsychiatric disorders. One popular explanation for these bad outcomes has been what is called the -leaky gut- hypothesis - in which potentially damaging bacteria are said to escape the intestine, triggering a chronic inflammatory response that can contribute to a variety of diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2022
Novel mutation associated with alternating hemiplegia of childhood
Novel mutation associated with alternating hemiplegia of childhood
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin and the Institute Imagine at Necker Hospital, Paris, announced a significant advance in our understanding of a very rare condition called alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). This is a devastating condition that can lead to repeated paralysis that affects one side of the body or the other or sometimes both at once.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.07.2022
Heart: better understanding its formation
Heart: better understanding its formation
Led by Cédric Blanpain - Stem Cell and Cancer Laboratory - researchers identify the mechanisms by which Mesp1 controls the specification and differentiation of early cardiac progeny. They allow the reconstruction of the gene regulatory network that governs cardiac development. This understanding is important for developing new therapeutic strategies .

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2022
Sperm are masters of tetris packing
Sperm are masters of tetris packing
Study sheds light on the process that plays a central role During sperm production, an enormous amount of DNA has to be packed into a very small space without breaking anything. A central role is played by certain proteins around which the DNA thread is wrapped - the protamines. A recent study by the University of Bonn provides new insights into this important mechanism.

Health - Innovation - 12.07.2022
Evolve... Innovate... Repeat: Scientists Peel Back the Layers of Virus-Host Evolution and Innovation
Culminating a 10-year research effort, researchers track the way fitness landscapes constantly change in the ongoing struggle for survival Scientists believe that if the original strain of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, had remain unchanged, the pandemic largely would be over by now. Instead, the virus has mutated several times, leading to more contagious strains and continued waves of COVID infections.
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