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Health - 28.01.2010
Low-sodium advice for asthmatics should be taken with a pinch of salt
Low-sodium advice for asthmatics should be taken with a pinch of salt
PA166/08 Following a low-sodium diet does not appear to have any appreciable impact on asthma control, according to new research. Contrary to past studies - which have suggested a link between low-sodium diets and improved asthma control - a new study by researchers at The University of Nottingham found no evidence that cutting back on salt helps patients with their symptoms.

Health - 28.01.2010
Possible link found between x-rays and prostate cancer
Possible link found between x-rays and prostate cancer
Researchers at The University of Nottingham have shown an association between certain past diagnostic radiation procedures and an increased risk of young-onset prostate cancer - a rare form of prostate cancer which affects about 10 per cent of all men diagnosed with the disease. The study, the first of its kind to report the relationship between low dose ionising radiation from diagnostic procedures and the risk of prostate cancer, was funded by the Prostate Cancer Research Foundation (PCRF) and is part of the UK Genetic Prostate Cancer Study (UKGPCS).

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2010
Smoking during pregnancy can put mums and babies at risk
Smoking during pregnancy can put mums and babies at risk
PA40/08 Pregnant women who suffer from the high risk condition pre-eclampsia - which leads to the death of hundreds of babies every year - are putting the lives of their unborn children at significantly increased risk if they continue to smoke during pregnancy. But experts at The University of Nottingham have also shown that if women give up smoking before or even during pregnancy they can significantly reduce these risks.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2010
Researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer's, before symptoms appear
Researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer’s, before symptoms appear
Estimates are that some 10 percent of people over the age of 65 will develop Alzheimer's disease, the scourge that robs people of their memories and, ultimately, their lives. While researchers race to find both the cause and the cure, others are moving just as fast to find the earliest signs that will predict an eventual onset of the disease, well before any outward symptoms.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2010
UCLA researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer’s, before symptoms appear
While researchers race to find both the cause and the cure, others are moving just as fast to find the earliest signs that will predict an eventual onset of the disease, well before any outward symptoms. The reason is simple: The earlier the diagnosis, the earlier treatments can be applied. Now, through the use of sophisticated brain-imaging techniques, researchers at UCLA have been able to predict a brain's progression to Alzheimer's by measuring subtle changes in brain structure over time, changes that occur long before symptoms can be seen.

Health - 28.01.2010
New insights into breast-feeding hormone
A mechanism for regulating the hormone prolactin has newly been revealed by scientists at Karolinska Institutet. The results are to be published in the scientific journal Neuron, and may be significant for conditions and functions such as breast-feeding, sexual libido, and metabolism. The hormone, prolactin, is released from the pituitary gland in the brain and is the signal that triggers breast milk production during nursing.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 27.01.2010
Study shows weight loss breakthrough for overweight children
Study shows weight loss breakthrough for overweight children
Professor Atul Singhal of the UCL Institute of Child Health led the study, published in the journal Obesity , which showed that participants in the MEND (Mind, Exercise, Nutrition? Do It!) programme lost weight, lowered their body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, and improved their self esteem and physical activity levels.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 27.01.2010
New method improves eating skills of dementia patients
A pioneering international study involving academics from the University of Sheffield has shown for the first time that it is possible to improve the eating skills and nutritional status of older people with dementia. The study, which was published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and funded by the National Health Research Institutes of Taiwan, tested two separate intervention methods to assess the eating patterns of dementia patients in Taiwan.

Health - 27.01.2010
Improved air quality linked to fewer pediatric ear infections
A new study by researchers at UCLA and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston suggests that improvements in air quality over the past decade have resulted in fewer cases of ear infections in children. Ear infections are one of the most common illnesses among children, with annual direct and indirect costs of $3 billion to $5 billion in the United States.

Health - 26.01.2010
Pomegranate extract stimulates uterine contractions
Pomegranate extract stimulates uterine contractions
Liverpool, UK - 27 January 2010: Scientists at the University of Liverpool and the Suranaree University of Technology, Thailand, have found that a naturally occurring steroid, present in pomegranate seed, could be used to stimulate uterine contractions. The team identified beta-sitosterol - a steroid that can inhibit the absorption of cholesterol in the intestine - as the main constituent of pomegranate seed extract.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 26.01.2010
Link Between Obesity and Enhanced Cancer Risk Elucidated
Epidemiological studies indicate that being overweight or obese is associated with increased cancer risk. The most dramatic effect of obesity on cancer risk has been noted for a common form of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC. Modeling the effect of obesity in mice, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conclusively demonstrated that obesity is tumor-promoting and have obtained evidence that this effect depends on induction of low-grade, chronic inflammation.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2010
Researchers Find New Insights into Inherited Retinal Disease
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered new links between a common form of inherited blindness affecting children and a gene known as Abelson helper integration site-1 (AHI1). Their findings, which may lead to new therapies and improved diagnostics for retinal disease, will appear online in advance of publication in the journal Nature Genetics on January 17.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2010
Scientists Show How Brain Tumors Outsmart Drugs
Researchers at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores UCSD Cancer Center have shown one way in which gliomas, a deadly type of brain tumor, can evade drugs aimed at blocking a key cell signaling protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR),that is crucial for tumor growth.

Health - Environment - 26.01.2010
Study links reduced fertility to flame retardant exposure
Study links reduced fertility to flame retardant exposure
BERKELEY — Women with higher blood levels of PBDEs, a type of flame retardant commonly found in household consumer products, took longer to become pregnant compared with women who have lower levels of PBDEs, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The study, to be published Jan.

Health - 26.01.2010
Blood pressure control abnormal in newborns of smoking mothers
Newborns of women who smoked during pregnancy show signs of circulatory dysfunction, according to a novel study from Karolinska Institutet. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal Hypertension, reveal that blood pressure and heart rate control is already abnormal in newborn babies of smoking mothers, and continues to worsen throughout the first year.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2010
UCL study: Emotions are a universal language
UCL study: Emotions are a universal language
A new study, led by UCL's Professor Sophie Scott, suggests that all humans share basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness ' and vocalise them in similar ways. The results of the study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , provide further evidence that such emotions form a set of basic, evolved functions that are shared by all humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.01.2010
Genetic testing no real help in predicting type 2 diabetes
Genetic testing no real help in predicting type 2 diabetes
New UCL research shows that genetic testing provides no real help in predicting the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for heart disease. The findings question the benefit of genetic direct-to-public home screening tests currently available on the market, which claim to be able to predict the risk of diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2010
Study predicts HIV drug resistance will surge
New research based on a novel mathematical model predicts that a wave of drug-resistant HIV strains will emerge in San Francisco within the next five years. These strains could prove disastrous by hindering control of the HIV pandemic. In a study published Jan. 14 on the website of the journal Science, researchers from the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the University of California, San Francisco's HIV AIDS Program at San Francisco General Hospital, developed a complex network model that tracks the transmission of multiple strains of HIV.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2010
Nano-motors facilitate communication between brain cells
Nano-motors facilitate communication between brain cells
MRC-funded scientists led by Dr Josef Kittler (UCL Neuroscience) have identified how nano-sized motors in nerve cells help to regulate the balance of communication in the brain. The findings may also help to explain why communication between nerve cells is disrupted in Huntington's disease, leading to altered electrical behaviour of nerve cells in this disease.

Physics - Health - 19.01.2010
Herschel readies itself for the Orion Nebula
Herschel readies itself for the Orion Nebula , showed that it was performing beyond its design specification. However, by 3 August 2009, something was clearly wrong and the instrument team and ESA had to decide what to do. Herschel is stationed 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, directly away from the Sun, and way out of the reach of astronauts.