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Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2011
Serendipity leads to lifesaving discovery
McGill research team found two distinct disease-causing mutations and saved a baby girl About two years ago, Dr. Philippe Gros, a McGill University professor in the Department of Biochemistry and a Principal Investigator in thd McGill Life Sciences Complex, described a mouse mutant that was immunodeficient and hypersensitive to the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and to tuberculosis (TB).

Health - 11.05.2011
Synthetic mesh can improve outcome of prolapse surgery
Synthetic mesh can improve outcome of prolapse surgery
A Nordic multicentre study, headed by researchers from Karolinska Institutet, shows that pelvic organ prolapse surgery using synthetic mesh can be more effective than traditional surgery. The advantages indicated by the study mainly concern restored genital anatomy and more efficient symptom relief, although there is an associated greater risk of complications.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2011
Coffee consumption modifies risk of breast cancer
[NEWS, 11 May 2011] In a new study, published in the journal Breast Cancer Research, a research group at Karolinska Institutet shows that drinking coffee may reduce the risk of so called ER-negative breast cancer in women. The researchers compared lifestyle factors and coffee consumption between women with breast cancer and healthy age-matched women.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2011
Therapies Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Could Encounter Immune Rejection Problems
An infiltration of T cells, shown by dark brown color, can be seen in the tissues formed by iPSCs. Credit: Yang Xu, UC San Diego Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that an important class of stem cells known as "induced pluripotent stem cells," or iPSCs, derived from an individual's own cells, could face immune rejection problems if they are used in future stem cell therapies.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2011
UK's biggest-ever study of lupus genes
UK’s biggest-ever study of lupus genes
The UK's biggest-ever study to discover the genes that cause the incurable autoimmune disease, lupus, is set to considerably advance understanding of the disease and could result in a genetic test predicting who is most likely to develop the condition. Researchers at King's are taking advantage of the latest advances in gene technology to analyse DNA samples from 5,000 people with lupus from all over the UK, Europe and Canada, in order to identify the full set of genes that predispose them to getting the condition.

Health - 10.05.2011
Engineers Develop New Method to Diagnose Heart Arrhythmias
Abnormalities in cardiac conduction — the rate at which the heart conducts electrical impulses to contract and relax — are a major cause of death and disability around the world. Researchers at Columbia Engineering School lead by Professor Elisa Konofagou have been developing a new method, Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI), that is the first non-invasive direct technique to map the electrical activation of the heart.

Health - 10.05.2011
New evidence for when Neanderthals died out
New evidence for when Neanderthals died out
Direct dating of a fossil of a Neanderthal infant suggests that Neanderthals probably died out earlier than previously thought. Researchers have dated a Neanderthal fossil discovered in a significant cave site in Russia in the northern Caucasus, and found it to be 10,000 years older than previous research had suggested.

Health - 10.05.2011
Sitting time is a diabetes risk factor for UK South Asians
A new study by scientists has revealed that time spent sitting down is a diabetes risk factor in South Asians independent of how much they exercise. Approximately one-quarter of UK South Asians over the age of 55 have type 2 diabetes. The study, conducted by researchers from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, screened 1,228 South Asians of Indian and Pakistani descent for blood glucose levels, waist size, time spent sitting down and physical activity levels.

Health - Economics / Business - 10.05.2011
Prolonged breastfeeding may be linked to fewer behaviour problems
Prolonged breastfeeding may be linked to fewer behaviour problems
Breastfeeding for four months or more is associated with fewer behavioural problems in children at age 5, an Oxford University study suggests. The findings, published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood , add to the evidence base on the benefits of breastfeeding. 'Our results provide even more evidence for the benefits of breastfeeding,' says Maria Quigley of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit at Oxford University, who led the work with Katriina Heikkilä.

Health - 10.05.2011
Continuing medical education for physicians on heart disease saves lives
[NEWS, 10 May 2011] Repeated, case-based medical training for primary care physicians can save lives of heart patients, according to a novel randomized case-control study from Karolinska Institutet. The current study is one of the first to evaluate the impact of physician continuing medical education (CME) on patient outcomes.

Health - 06.05.2011
Virus insight may help avoid farm culls
New insight into foot-and-mouth disease could help develop alternatives to mass culling, following University research. Scientists have pinpointed a time window during which cattle infected with the virus can be identified before they become infectious to other cattle, or show signs of illness.

Health - 06.05.2011
Prostate cancer treatment study
Prostate cancer treatment study
A study co-led by researchers at King's College London shows that the percentage of men who had a radical prostatectomy (removal of the prostate and surrounding cancer cells) and survived for 15 years is higher than men who were only given treatment at signs of further progression of prostate cancer, an approach known as 'watchful waiting.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2011
Insight into HIV immunity may lead to vaccine
Latest insights into immunity to HIV could help to develop a vaccine to build antibodies? defences against the disease, a University of Melbourne study has found. By investigating the action of the human antibodies called ADCC, in people with HIV, researchers were able to identify that the virus evolves to evade or 'escape' the antibodies.

Health - 06.05.2011
Surgery reduces risk of death from prostate cancer also in low-risk group
[NEWS, 5 May 2011] A Swedish research team, partly consisting of researchers from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institutet, followed a group of prostate cancer patients in the Nordic region for 15 years. The study found, among other things, that surgery reduces the risk that men with prostate cancer will die within 15 years - even for those with low-risk tumours.

Health - 05.05.2011
Scientists Afflict Computers with Schizophrenia to Better Understand the Human Brain
AUSTIN, Texas — Computer networks that can't forget fast enough can show symptoms of a kind of virtual schizophrenia, giving researchers further clues to the inner workings of schizophrenic brains, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Yale University have found. The researchers used a virtual computer model, or "neural network," to simulate the excessive release of dopamine in the brain.

Health - 05.05.2011
Painful periods increase sensitivity to pain throughout the month
Painful periods increase sensitivity to pain throughout the month
Women with painful periods show increased sensitivity to pain throughout their cycles, even when there is no background period pain. The brain imaging study carried out at Oxford University shows that period pain is associated with differences in the way the brain processes pain, and that these differences persist throughout a woman's menstrual cycle.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.05.2011
Worm discovery could help one billion people worldwide
Scientists have discovered why some people may be protected from harmful parasitic worms naturally while others cannot in what could lead to new therapies for up to one billion people worldwide. Parasitic worms are a major cause of mortality and morbidity affecting up to a billion people, particularly in the Third World, as well as domestic pets and livestock across the globe.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.05.2011
Daily pill for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Daily pill for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A new drug for the muscle-wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown significant benefits in mice, opening the door for clinical trials. The promising results indicate that a simple, daily pill to treat all patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy should be possible, whether or not this specific drug formulation makes it all the way through clinical trials without further development.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.05.2011
Getting to the HIV test: It takes a village
If you want to improve HIV testing rates in remote rural areas, get the community involved, says UCLA's Thomas Coates, who has directed a new study examining HIV testing programs in communities in Africa and Southeast Asia.

Health - Psychology - 04.05.2011
Latinas victimized by domestic violence much likelier to experience postpartum depression
Latinas who endure violence at the hands of a partner during or within a year of pregnancy are five times more likely to suffer postpartum depression than women who have not experienced such violence, according to a new study by researchers at the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities.