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Health - 17.05.2011
Medical devices under scrutiny
Medical devices under scrutiny
Health Jonathan Wood | 17 May 11 'When Suzanne Ludgate of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the government regulator of medical devices in the UK, says she was "appalled at how many devices are brought to market with a lack of appropriate clinical data," you know there must be a problem.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2011
'Octopus' provides cancer breakthrough
’Octopus’ provides cancer breakthrough
Researchers at King's have achieved a breakthrough in understanding a biological process which causes many common cancers, including lung and breast cancer. The achievement opens up new possibilities for the development of improved cancer drugs. The findings are published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2011
Protection against one of Africa’s oldest animal plagues
An international research team, including University of Manchester scientists, using a new combination of approaches has found two genes that may prove of vital importance to the lives and livelihoods of millions of farmers in a tsetse fly-plagued swathe of Africa. The team's results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , is aimed at finding the biological keys to protection from a single-celled trypanosome parasite that causes both African sleeping sickness in people and a wasting disease in cattle.

Health - 17.05.2011
Improved survival and treatment for chronic blood disorders
Improved survival and treatment for chronic blood disorders
[NEWS 2011-05-17] New research from Karolinska Institutet shows that hydroxyurea, one type of cytotoxic treatment for chronic myeloproliferative blood disorders, does not increase the risk of developing acute leukaemia, as had previously been suspected. Rather, it is the disease itself that mainly increases this risk.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.05.2011
New statistical method could improve search for genes involved in common diseases
FINDINGS: Recent breakthroughs in the analysis of genetic variation in large populations have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes involved in dozens of common diseases. Many of these discoveries were enabled by performing "meta-analysis," which combines information from multiple genetic studies in order to create even larger studies.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2011
Scientists find genetic link to depression
Research led by King's College London has discovered the first solid evidence that genetic variations on chromosome 3 may cause depression. In a rare occurrence in genetic research the findings have been replicated concurrently by another group from Washington University, and both papers are published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 16.05.2011
'Master switch' gene for obesity and diabetes
’Master switch’ gene for obesity and diabetes
A team of researchers, led by King's College London and the University of Oxford, have found that a gene linked to type 2 diabetes and cholesterol levels is in fact a 'master regulator' gene, which controls the behaviour of other genes found within fat in the body. As fat plays a key role in susceptibility to metabolic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes, this study highlights the regulatory gene as a possible target for future treatments to fight these diseases.

Health - Pedagogy - 16.05.2011
Sleepiness in children linked to obesity, asthma
Hershey, Pa. Obese, asthmatic, anxious or depressed children are more likely to experience excessive daytime sleepiness, or EDS, according to Penn State College of Medicine sleep researchers. "Although EDS in children is commonly assumed by physicians and the public to be the result of sleep-disordered breathing or inadequate sleep, our data suggest that EDS in young children is more strongly associated with obesity and mood issues as it is in adults," said Edward Bixler, professor of psychiatry and vice chair of research at the Sleep Research and Treatment Center.

Health - 13.05.2011
Sickle Cell Drug Safe and Effective
Sickle Cell Drug Safe and Effective
— Coral Gables — The findings from one of the largest sickle cell anemia studies of its kind could change the standard of care for very young children with the disease. Researchers from the Miller School of Medicine and 13 medical centers across the United States conducted a randomized double-blinded trial to test the impact of hydroxyurea therapy for children between the ages of 9 to 18 months.

Health - 13.05.2011
New form of inflammation
University scientists have discovered a previously unknown way in which white blood cells cope with injury and infection. Fighting infection It was previously assumed that when tissue becomes injured or infected, white blood cells enter the tissue via the bloodstream to repair and protect it from further damage.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.05.2011
Genetic clue to common birth defects found
Genetic clue to common birth defects found
Scientists at King's College London have for the first time uncovered a gene responsible for Adams-Oliver Syndrome (AOS), a condition which can cause birth defects of the heart, limbs or blood vessels. The study, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics today, gives valuable insight not only into this particular condition, but also the possible genetic causes of these common birth defects found in the wider population.

Psychology - Health - 13.05.2011
’Consciousness connections’ revealed in coma brains
A new test of consciousness which could be helpful in the diagnosis of coma patients has been identified in new research led by scientists from the University of Liège and UCL. Recent studies have shown that patients with severe brain damage who show little outward signs of perception or understanding may have a certain degree of pain experience and awareness.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.05.2011
Evolution, reversed
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Ever since Charles Darwin proposed his theory of evolution in 1859, scientists have wondered whether evolutionary adaptations can be reversed. Answering that question has proved difficult, partly due to conflicting evidence. In 2003, scientists showed that some species of insects have gained, lost and regained wings over millions of years.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2011
Serendipity leads to lifesaving discovery
McGill research team found two distinct disease-causing mutations and saved a baby girl About two years ago, Dr. Philippe Gros, a McGill University professor in the Department of Biochemistry and a Principal Investigator in thd McGill Life Sciences Complex, described a mouse mutant that was immunodeficient and hypersensitive to the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and to tuberculosis (TB).

Health - 11.05.2011
Synthetic mesh can improve outcome of prolapse surgery
Synthetic mesh can improve outcome of prolapse surgery
A Nordic multicentre study, headed by researchers from Karolinska Institutet, shows that pelvic organ prolapse surgery using synthetic mesh can be more effective than traditional surgery. The advantages indicated by the study mainly concern restored genital anatomy and more efficient symptom relief, although there is an associated greater risk of complications.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2011
Coffee consumption modifies risk of breast cancer
[NEWS, 11 May 2011] In a new study, published in the journal Breast Cancer Research, a research group at Karolinska Institutet shows that drinking coffee may reduce the risk of so called ER-negative breast cancer in women. The researchers compared lifestyle factors and coffee consumption between women with breast cancer and healthy age-matched women.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2011
Therapies Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Could Encounter Immune Rejection Problems
An infiltration of T cells, shown by dark brown color, can be seen in the tissues formed by iPSCs. Credit: Yang Xu, UC San Diego Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that an important class of stem cells known as "induced pluripotent stem cells," or iPSCs, derived from an individual's own cells, could face immune rejection problems if they are used in future stem cell therapies.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2011
UK's biggest-ever study of lupus genes
UK’s biggest-ever study of lupus genes
The UK's biggest-ever study to discover the genes that cause the incurable autoimmune disease, lupus, is set to considerably advance understanding of the disease and could result in a genetic test predicting who is most likely to develop the condition. Researchers at King's are taking advantage of the latest advances in gene technology to analyse DNA samples from 5,000 people with lupus from all over the UK, Europe and Canada, in order to identify the full set of genes that predispose them to getting the condition.

Health - 10.05.2011
Engineers Develop New Method to Diagnose Heart Arrhythmias
Abnormalities in cardiac conduction — the rate at which the heart conducts electrical impulses to contract and relax — are a major cause of death and disability around the world. Researchers at Columbia Engineering School lead by Professor Elisa Konofagou have been developing a new method, Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI), that is the first non-invasive direct technique to map the electrical activation of the heart.

Health - 10.05.2011
New evidence for when Neanderthals died out
New evidence for when Neanderthals died out
Direct dating of a fossil of a Neanderthal infant suggests that Neanderthals probably died out earlier than previously thought. Researchers have dated a Neanderthal fossil discovered in a significant cave site in Russia in the northern Caucasus, and found it to be 10,000 years older than previous research had suggested.