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Life Sciences - Health - 14.07.2010
Stem cells to aid study of Parkinson’s
A new stem cell technology is to be used by Oxford University researchers to better understand the causes of Parkinson's disease. The technique will use skin samples to grow the brain cells thought to be responsible for the onset of Parkinson's disease, allowing these important neurons to be studied in detail.

Physics - Health - 14.07.2010
Scientists find unusual electrons that go with the flow
Scientists find unusual electrons that go with the flow
On a quest to discover new states of matter, a team of Princeton University scientists has found that electrons on the surface of specific materials act like miniature superheroes, relentlessly dodging the cliff-like obstacles of imperfect microsurfaces, sometimes moving straight through barriers. The Princeton work represents the first time such behavior of electrons has been tracked and recorded, and hints at the possibilities of speeding up integrated circuits that process information by flow of electrons between different devices.

Health - History / Archeology - 14.07.2010
Researchers discover possible way to predict Alzheimer’s
Media Inquiries news [a] uwhealth (p) org Our Services Geriatrics Neurology Internet Resources Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute Follow Us MADISON - Two new studies, involving a newly identified gene, show that Alzheimer's disease could be diagnosed as much as 20 years before symptoms develop.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.07.2010
Retrovirus replication process different than thought
Hershey, Pa. How a retrovirus, like HIV, reproduces and assembles new viruses is different than previously thought, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Understanding the steps a virus takes for assembly could allow development of a way to prevent the spread of retroviral diseases.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.07.2010
Suicide attempt method affects prognosis
The method used for a suicide attempt is highly significant for the risk of subsequent successful suicide, reveals a long-term study from Karolinska Institutet. The results may be of help in acute risk assessment following a suicide attempt. Suicide is one of the most common causes of death among those aged 15 to 44.

Health - 13.07.2010
'Test and treat' won't stop HIV/AIDS epidemic, study finds
’Test and treat’ won’t stop HIV/AIDS epidemic, study finds
Implementing a program of universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral treatment (ART) for infected individuals could have a major impact on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Washington, DC , but a new study by led by Harvard researchers finds that it would not halt the epidemic, something that a previous report had projected.

Health - Computer Science - 13.07.2010
Scientists Identify New Virus That May Threaten Salmon
' Epidemiology ' Research & Service ' What's Killing Farmed Salmon' U.S. and Norwegian Scientists Identify a New Virus That May Also Pose a Risk to Wild Salmon What's Killing Farmed Salmon' U.S. and Norwegian Scientists Identify a New Virus That May Also Pose a Risk to Wild Salmon Farmed fish are an increasingly important food source, with a global harvest now at 110 million tons and growing at more than 8 percent a year.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.07.2010
Genes 'decide who wins in body's battle against cancer'
Genes ’decide who wins in body’s battle against cancer’
UCL researchers have discovered that two genes, called Mahjong and Lgl, could be star players in helping to identify how the body's own cells fight back against cancer cells. This discovery could lead to future treatments to make healthy cells better-equipped to attack cancer cells, an entirely new concept for cancer research.

Health - 12.07.2010
A better way to measure global poverty
A better way to measure global poverty
The Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) of Oxford University and the Human Development Report Office of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) today launched a new poverty measure that gives a 'multidimensional' picture of people living in poverty, which its creators say could help target development resources more effectively.

Health - Economics / Business - 12.07.2010
Could our minds be tricked into satisfying our stomachs?
Could our minds be tricked into satisfying our stomachs?
The key to losing weight could lie in manipulating our beliefs about how filling we think food will be before we eat it, suggesting that portion control is all a matter of perception. Studies showed that participants were more satisfied for longer periods of time after consuming varying quantities of food when they were led to believe that portion sizes were larger than they actually were.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.07.2010
Video: Eating pistachios lowers cholesterol, boosts antioxidants, more
A 1.5-ounce serving of pistachios - about a handful - as part of a healthy diet can benefit your heart. Click on the image to watch a video explaining the health benefits of pistachios. University Park, Pa. Pistachio nuts, eaten as part of a healthy diet, can increase the levels of antioxidants in the blood of adults with high cholesterol, according to an international team of nutritional scientists including Penny Kris-Etherton, distinguished professor of nutrition at Penn State.

Chemistry - Health - 11.07.2010
Fundamental forces in protein structure revisited
Fundamental forces in protein structure revisited
Research scientists from Bristol have joined forces with colleagues from America to unravel one of the fundamental problems of molecular biology, paving the way for better engineering of biological systems. Proteins are considered the workhorses of biology, performing a wide variety of tasks including transporting oxygen around blood vessels, contributing to the fabric of tissues such as skin, and mediating most of the chemical reactions in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.07.2010
Protein linked to aging may boost memory and learning ability
Protein linked to aging may boost memory and learning ability
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. The same molecular mechanism that increases life span through calorie restriction may help boost memory and brainpower, researchers at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory report in the July 11 issue of Nature . Resveratrol, found in wine, has been touted as a life-span enhancer because it activates a group of enzymes known as sirtuins, which have gained fame in recent years for their ability to slow the aging process.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.07.2010
Call for more help for silent victims
Call for more help for silent victims
PA 177/10 "I have had major bone problems and an operation on my spine, and I am now questioning whether that was to do with the beatings?"...the words of a 63 year old woman who took part in new research just published, into the effects of domestic violence on older women. The year-long study by researchers at The University of Nottingham's Division of Nursing has concluded that more needs to be done to identify, support and protect these victims.

Health - Computer Science - 08.07.2010
Scientists Use Computer Algorithms to Develop New Flu Vaccines
July 09, 2010 — Coral Gables — Every year, hundreds of thousands of people die from influenza all over the world. Defeating the illness is challenging because the virus evolves by frequent changes of its genetic code, making it difficult for scientists to manufacture effective vaccines for the seasonal flu in a timely manner.

Health - 08.07.2010
Study confirms that methadone works and saves lives for injecting drug users
Study confirms that methadone works and saves lives for injecting drug users
Methadone treatment improves long-term survival of drug users and reduces the risk of death with each year of treatment, a study has shown. Research carried out by the universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Edinburgh found that opiate substitution treatment reduced the frequency of drug use and led to a drop in the risk of death by 13 per cent each year.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2010
Canine influenza vaccine found effective against secondary infections
Recent research by Ron Schultz , professor and chair of the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has shown the newly approved Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) vaccine to be effective not only in reducing length, severity and spread of the virus, but also in protecting against secondary infections.

Health - 08.07.2010
Stem cell detectives uncover potential cancer cause
Stem cell detectives uncover potential cancer cause
Australian researchers have uncovered a new mutation in stem cells that may be linked to the development of leukaemia, breast and colon cancer. A team led by Dr Peter Papathanasiou from The John Curtin School of Medical Research at The Australian National University and Associate Professor Andrew Perkins from the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland have completed a three-year screening project to find the genes that control the development and turnover of stem cells.

Health - Chemistry - 07.07.2010
Mom's influence comes first
Mom’s influence comes first
Genome-wide analysis of mice brains has found that maternally inherited genes are expressed preferentially in the developing brain, while the pattern shifts decisively in favor of paternal influence by adulthood. The researchers report having identified 1,300 genes active in the mouse brain that show some degree of parental bias, greatly expanding on the 45 previously known 'imprinted genes' expressed in the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2010
Maternal Genes Predominate in the Developing Brain; Paternal Genes Gain the Upper Hand in Adulthood
Cambridge, Mass. July 8, 2010 - Genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain has found that maternally inherited genes are expressed preferentially in the developing brain, while gene expression shifts decisively in favor of paternal influence by adulthood. The study, led by Catherine Dulac and Christopher Gregg at Harvard University and described in the journal Science, identified 1,300 genes active in the mouse brain that show some degree of parental bias, greatly expanding on the 45 previously known "imprinted genes" expressed in the brain.