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Health - Pharmacology - 11.11.2011
New therapeutic avenues for obesity
New therapeutic avenues for obesity
Newly discovered mechanisms lay the foundation for a new therapeutic avenues that one day may be beneficial in treating diseases, ranging from muscle weakness and frailty to obesity and diabetes. Researchers from EPFL published a study which highlight on the roles of a nuclear receptor co-repressor, NCoR1.

Health - 11.11.2011
Price of crime for middle-aged
A life of crime starts to damage offenders' health once they reach their 40s, new research has shown. A collaboration led by the Violence and Society Research Group has analysed the lifestyles of a group of inner city males from boyhood to middle age. In their 20s and 30s, repeat offenders in the group were often fitter than their more law-abiding contemporaries.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.11.2011
New ADHD findings
New ADHD findings
A combination of rare and common genetic variations could play a part in biological pathways linked to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Cardiff University scientists revealed last year that children with the condition, like those with autism, were more likely than unaffected individuals to carry duplicated or omitted small DNA segments known as copy number variants (CNVs).

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Multiple malaria vaccine developed
A new malaria vaccine has been created to target different forms of the disease and help those most at risk. The parasites that cause malaria come in many different forms. This new vaccine works by triggering a range of antibodies to fight the different malaria parasites. Many existing vaccines target only a limited part of the parasite population, making them less effective.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Non-Coding RNA Relocates Genes When It’s Time To Go To Work
Cells develop and thrive by turning genes on and off as needed in a precise pattern, a process known as regulated gene transcription. In a paper published in the November 9 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience , researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say this process is even more complex than previously thought, with regulated genes actually relocated to other, more conducive places in the cell nucleus.

Health - Environment - 10.11.2011
Wood smoke from cooking fires linked to pneumonia, cognitive impacts
Wood smoke from cooking fires linked to pneumonia, cognitive impacts
Two new studies led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers spotlight the human health effects of exposure to smoke from open fires and dirty cookstoves, the primary source of cooking and heating for 43 percent, or some 3 billion members, of the world's population. Women and young children in poverty are particularly vulnerable.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2011
Biologists uncover a novel cellular proofreading mechanism
To make proteins, cells assemble long chains of amino acids, based on genetic instructions from DNA. That construction takes place in a tiny cellular structure called a ribosome, to which amino acids are delivered by transfer RNA (tRNA). Each of the 20 amino acids encoded by the genetic code is carried by a specific type of tRNA.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2011
Tiny worms change direction using two human-like neural circuits
Tiny worms change direction using two human-like neural circuits
Biologists have found that the strategies used by the tiny C. elegans roundworm to control its motions are remarkably similar to those used by the human brain to command movement of eyes, arms and legs. C. elegans, a nematode about 1 millimeter in length, is one of the most widely used animals in biological research.

Health - 10.11.2011
New target identified to stop the spread of breast cancer
A new potential target to slow breast cancer tumor progression and metastasis has been identified by a team of researchers led by Richard Kremer from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). Complications in breast cancer patients are commonly caused by the spread of the disease through metastasis to other parts of the body, most often to the bones and lungs.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
New way to predict MS diagnosis in children
Early MRI scans can help predict the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, which may permit earlier initiation of treatment, according to a new national study. The study was led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Toronto and was performed as a part of the Canadian Pediatric Demyelinating Disease Network, a 23-site study that includes all paediatric health-care facilities in Canada.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
To design drugs that could target particular nerve cells
To design drugs that could target particular nerve cells
The future of drug design lies in developing therapies that can target specific cellular processes without causing adverse reactions in other areas of the nervous system. Scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Liège in Belgium have discovered how to design drugs to target specific areas of the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.11.2011
'Tis better to give than to receive?
’Tis better to give than to receive?
Providing support to a loved one offers benefits to the giver, not just the recipient, a new brain-imaging study by UCLA life scientists reveals.

Health - Psychology - 09.11.2011
Coming through cancer... together
PA 350/11 The role that emotional support plays in helping a patient in their fight against breast cancer is to be examined as part of a year-long research project at The University of Nottingham. Second-year applied psychology PhD student Prema Nirgude is recruiting people who have overcome the illness, and their partners, to talk about how they coped following the diagnosis and supported one another during treatment.

Health - 09.11.2011
Preventing pancreatic cell death in type 1 diabetes
Diabetes researchers at Yale University have developed a method to detect and measure the destruction of beta cells that occurs in the pancreas by measuring DNA expression in the blood. The destruction of beta cells leads, over time, to type 1 diabetes. Their finding could ultimately lead to a treatment that stops the progression of the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.11.2011
Depression and chronic stress accelerates aging
People with recurrent depressions or those exposed to chronic stress exhibits shorter telomeres in white blood cells. This is shown by a research team at Umeå University in a coming issue of Biological Psychiatry. The telomere is the outermost part of the chromosome. With increasing age, telomeres shorten, and studies have shown that oxidative stress and inflammation accelerates this shortening.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.11.2011
Neurological Disorder Impacts Brain Cells Differently
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and University of Washington describe in deeper detail the pathology of a devastating neurological disorder, but also reveal new cellular targets for possibly slowing its development. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is an inherited neurological disorder in which cells in the cerebellum and brainstem degenerate, resulting in progressive loss of physical coordination and possible blindness.

Health - Psychology - 09.11.2011
Major study returns to probe mid-life, recession-related harm
The deepest economic downturn since the Great Depression is a prime research opportunity for " Midlife in the United States ," a long-running and expansive study of the interplay between social and psychological factors and physical health. Led by a group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and incorporating dozens of psychologists, sociologists, neuroscientists and biologists around the country, MIDUS will return this fall for a third look at the lives of thousands of Americans ages 25 to 95.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.11.2011
Re-training the brain
People experiencing the early signs of Parkinson's disease could see their symptoms improved through a process of regulating and re-training how their brains respond to certain activities and actions, new University research has uncovered. Experts from the University's MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics & Genomics and School of Psychology, in a paper published in The Journal of Neuroscience , used real-time brain imaging to identify how people with Parkinson's disease react to their own brain responses.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Biologists slow the aging process in fruit flies
Biologists slow the aging process in fruit flies
The biologists, working with fruit flies, activated a gene called PGC-1, which increases the activity of mitochondria, the tiny power generators in cells that control cell growth and tell cells when to live and die. "We took this gene and boosted its activity in different cells and tissues of the fly and asked whether this impacts the aging process," said David Walker, an assistant professor of integrative biology and physiology at UCLA and a senior author of the study.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.11.2011
Imaging technique IDs plaques, tangles in brains of severely depressed older adults
Imaging technique IDs plaques, tangles in brains of severely depressed older adults
Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying biology of its development in older adults. In a small study published in the November issue of the peer-reviewed journal Archives of General Psychiatry, UCLA researchers used a unique brain scan to assess the levels of amyloid plaques and tau tangles in older adults with a type of severe depression called major depressive disorder (MDD).