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Health - 02.07.2010
Prolonged depression slows stroke recovery
Prolonged depression slows stroke recovery
The impact of depression on recovery from stroke has been largely underestimated and patients' psychological wellbeing should be monitored much more closely, according to the researchers from the University of Leeds. Around a third of people experience depression after a stroke. Doctors often assume that this downturn in mood is to be expected and that it will be short-lived.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.07.2010
’Wonder gene’ found to affect blood pressure
Scientists have identified an important gene that regulates the function of the muscle cells in arteries and thereby helps determine blood pressure. Dr Paolo Tammaro and his team at the University of Manchester hope their work on the gene – already known to be involved in a lot of different processes in the body such as regulating how the heart beats and how brain cells function – will help the pharmaceutical industry to design novel blood-pressure lowering drugs.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.07.2010
Tibetans adapted to high altitude in less than 3,000 years
Tibetans adapted to high altitude in less than 3,000 years
BERKELEY — A comparison of the genomes of 50 Tibetans and 40 Han Chinese shows that ethnic Tibetans split off from the Han less than 3,000 years ago and since then rapidly evolved a unique ability to thrive at high altitudes and low oxygen levels. The genome-wide comparison, performed by evolutionary biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, uncovered more than 30 genes with DNA mutations that have become more prevalent in Tibetans than Han Chinese, nearly half of which are related to how the body uses oxygen.

Health - 01.07.2010
Cell test could predict DCIS Breast cancer recurrence
Cell test could predict DCIS Breast cancer recurrence
Cell test could predict DCIS Breast cancer recurrence 01 Jul 2010, PR 147/10 A new test could predict which women have an aggressive form of breast cancer in the milk ducts and spare other women from unnecessary radiotherapy, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer today. The study author is Professor Sarah Pinder, Division of Cancer Studies.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2010
Depressed mice could aid research on depression in humans
University Park, Pa. — New research shows that a unique strain of laboratory mice characterized at Penn State has behavioral, hormonal and neurochemical characteristics that are similar to those of human patients with drug-resistant forms of depression. The mice, which have a defect in a gene, are expected to be useful as a new model organism in the effort to develop more effective medications for specific forms of depression.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2010
A butterfly effect in the brain
A butterfly effect in the brain
Next time your brain plays tricks on you the brain is intrinsically unreliable. This may not seem surprising to most of us, but it has puzzled neuroscientists for decades. Given that the brain is the most powerful computing device known, how can it perform so well even though the behaviour of its circuits is variable? A long-standing hypothesis is that the brain's circuitry actually is reliable - and the apparently high variability is because your brain is engaged in many tasks simultaneously, which affect each other.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2010
Caltech Biologists Discover How T Cells Make a Commitment
Caltech Biologists Discover How T Cells Make a Commitment
PASADENA, Calif.—When does a cell decide its particular identity? According to biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), in the case of T cells—immune system cells that help destroy invading pathogens—the answer is when the cells begin expressing a particular gene called Bcl11b.

Health - 30.06.2010
Rare variants in gene coding may up risk of autoimmune disorders
Rare variants in gene coding may up risk of autoimmune disorders
Rare variants in the gene coding of an enzyme that controls the activity of a key immune cell occur more often in people with autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes , Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found in a multi-institutional study. The researchers' report identifies a pathway that could be a therapeutic target and may present a model for future studies of the role of rare gene variants in common disorders.

Health - Linguistics / Literature - 30.06.2010
More Than Two Billion People Worldwide Lack Access to Surgical Services
More Than Two Billion People Worldwide Lack Access to Surgical Services
More than two billion people worldwide do not have adequate access to surgical treatment, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) . The Harvard researchers also found that people living in high-income regions have far greater access to surgery sites (operating theatres) than do those living in low-income regions and that surgical facilities in low-income settings often lack essential equipment.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2010
Histone H1 regulates gene activity throughout the cell cycle
Histone H1 regulates gene activity throughout the cell cycle
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A protein that helps pack DNA into the cell nucleus has an important role in regulating gene activity, scientists report. The researchers found that the protein, histone H1, also takes part in the formation of ribosomes, the cellular workbenches on which all proteins are made. The study appeared online May 3 in The Journal of Cell Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.06.2010
Research: Major breakthrough will revolutionize the screening and treatment of genetic diseases
An international first: a research team at MUHC/McGill validates the effectiveness of a rapid genome sequencing process for hereditary genetic diseases A research team led by Dr. Nada Jabado at the MUHC Research Institute (RI MUHC) and Dr. Jacek Majewski at McGill University has proven for the first time that it is possible to identify any genetic disease in record time thanks to a powerful and reliable exome sequencing method.

Health - 29.06.2010
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson’s disease transplant treatment
Researchers overcome major obstacle in transplant treatment to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease - News Release Issued by the Medical Research Council Embargoed until 1900 UK Time 30 June 2010 Researchers funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Imperial College London have overcome a major obstacle in the development of a transplant treatment which could relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, according to new research published today.

Health - 29.06.2010
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson’s disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment Researchers overcome major obstacle in transplant treatment to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease Issued by the Medical Research Council Embargoed until 1900 UK Time 30 June 2010 Researchers funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Imperial College London have overcome a major obstacle in the development of a transplant treatment which could relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, according to new research published today.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2010
Researchers Show How Active Immune Tolerance Makes Pregnancy Possible
Understanding of mouse immune-system response to specific fetal antigens also may provide insight into issues that arise during human pregnancies PASADENA, Calif.—The concept of pregnancy makes no sense—at least not from an immunological point of view. After all, a fetus, carrying half of its father's genome, is biologically distinct from its mother.

Health - 29.06.2010
With fasting, enzyme turns off body’s production of fats, cholesterol
Fasting helps cause an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol, Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have found. The findings could lead to new approaches to treating elevated cholesterol and lipid levels . The researchers' report, published today in Genes & Development , describes how SIRT1, one of a group of enzymes called sirtuins, suppresses the activity of a family of proteins called SREBPs, which control the body's synthesis and handling of fats and cholesterol.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2010
Importance of cell-cell communication
Importance of cell-cell communication
A team from the Bristol Heart Institute have investigated the importance of cell-cell communication in regulating the formation of new blood vessels following the restriction in blood supply to the heart or back leg in mice. The research, by Paolo Madeddu, Professor of Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine and his team in the Bristol Heart Institute (BHI) at the University of Bristol, was funded by the British Heart Foundation and is published in the leading journal Circulation Research .

Health - Psychology - 29.06.2010
Research links workplace bullying with ill-health
A new study by the University of Sheffield has uncovered new evidence of a strong link between workplace bullying and the subsequent psychological ill-health of employees. The study, which was funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), found that bullying from organisational insiders, for example colleagues, subordinates and superiors, significantly influenced levels of stress reported seven months later.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2010
Prolonged altitude training could reduce endurance
Prolonged altitude training could reduce endurance
New research suggests that athletes and footballers may want to limit the time they spend training at altitude to improve their performance. An Oxford University study has found that people with a rare condition that mimics being at high altitude for long periods show metabolic differences that actually reduce their endurance and physical performance.

Health - 29.06.2010
Overall safety of statins confirmed
Overall safety of statins confirmed
The use of statins in patients without a prior history of heart attacks and strokes is of little real benefit in preventing deaths in the short term - the largest study of its type to date has found. Researchers from the University of Cambridge and St George's Hospital, London analysed data from 65,000 participants around the world in 11 randomized controlled trials.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2010
South Asians have highest rate of heart disease in UK
South Asians have highest rate of heart disease in UK
The burden of heart disease among ethnic minorities in the UK is revealed in a new report compiled by Oxford University researchers for the British Heart Foundation. The figures suggest that while the South Asian population suffers the highest rates of heart disease, many could be missing out on access to some treatments.