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Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2010
Scientists find important new step in protein production
Scientists at the University of Manchester have identified an extra step in protein production, a major activity of all cells, which they believe impacts particularly on how our cells respond to stresses such as starvation and virus attack. Drs Graham Pavitt and Martin Jennings, whose findings are published in Nature today (20 May 2010), have found a new function for a protein, called eIF5, which is critical for appropriate and normal control of the protein production process.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2010
Preventing cells from getting the kinks out of DNA
BERKELEY — Many standard antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs block the enzymes that snip the kinks and knots out of DNA — DNA tangles are lethal to cells — but the drugs are increasingly encountering resistant bacteria and tumors. A new discovery by University of California, Berkeley, biochemists could pave the way for new research into how to re-design these drugs to make them more effective poisons for cancer cells and harmful bacteria.

Health - 20.05.2010
Malaria parasites fight effects of drugs
A University study suggests that malaria parasites can detect when they are being threatened and change their behaviour in order to increase their chances of survival. Researchers hope that the study, funded by the Wellcome Trust, may inform strategies to control the disease, which causes one million deaths each year.

Environment - Health - 20.05.2010
Scientists confirm polluted groundwater flows from septic systems to the sea
Scientists confirm polluted groundwater flows from septic systems to the sea
Stanford University researchers have tracked a plume of polluted groundwater from a septic system to one of California's top recreational beaches. The results may be an important step in improving coastal wastewater management in the United States. Faulty septic systems have long been blamed for polluting some of California's most popular beaches.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.05.2010
Genetic link to infectious disease susceptibility found
Genetic link to infectious disease susceptibility found
Genetic variants that increase susceptibility to several infectious diseases - including tuberculosis and malaria - have been identified by researchers from Oxford and Singapore. The variations in DNA sequence identified by the scientists occur within a single gene involved in the body's immune response to infectious disease.

Environment - Health - 20.05.2010
Control, not climate change, key to malaria
Control, not climate change, key to malaria
A study published today in the journal Nature casts doubt on the widely held notion that warming global temperatures will lead to a future intensification of malaria and an expansion of its global range. The research, conducted by the Malaria Atlas Project (MAP), a multinational team including Oxford University researchers and funded mainly by the Wellcome Trust, suggests that current interventions could have a far more dramatic - and positive - effect on reducing the spread of malaria than any negative effects caused by climate change.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.05.2010
Extending lifespan has mixed effects on learning and memory
Extending lifespan has mixed effects on learning and memory
Decreasing the intake of calories and tweaking the activity of the hormone insulin are two methods long known to increase lifespan in a wide range of organisms. In particular, studies have shown that longevity can be extended by reducing activity in the insulin-signaling pathway - a chain of events through which insulin influences numerous biological processes, including metabolism, stress response and development.

Health - 19.05.2010
Swine flu measures bought valuable time in Vietnam
Swine flu measures bought valuable time in Vietnam
Containment measures introduced in Vietnam to prevent the spread of swine flu did not succeed in halting the virus, but may have bought health services and clinical researchers valuable time, according to research led by Oxford University scientists. The study, carried out in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, also showed that patients with mild disease responded favourably in terms of viral clearance - and hence reduced transmission of the virus - to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the most commonly-used antiviral drug, when given in the first 3-4 days of illness.

Health - 19.05.2010
New technique enables drugs tests via exhaled breath
A new study from Karolinska Institutet presents a new technique that makes drug testing possible through exhaled air for the first time. By examining people who had received emergency care for an amphetamine overdose, the researchers found that in all cases there were traces of amphetamine and metamphetamine in the exhaled breath.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2010
Antibiotics have significant resistance effects on individual patients in primary care
Antibiotics have significant resistance effects on individual patients in primary care
Antibiotics prescribed in primary care make a considerable contribution to the problem of antimicrobial resistance, both in individual patients and the population as a whole, according to research from the University of Bristol published in this week's BMJ.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.05.2010
Birds and mammals share a common brain circuit for learning
Birds and mammals share a common brain circuit for learning
Stanford team wins $200,000 MIT Clean Energy Prize with revolutionary electrode design to improve solar panel performance CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? Bird song learning is a model system for studying the general principles of learning, but attempts to draw parallels between learning in birds and mammals have been difficult because of anatomical brain differences between the two species.

Health - Psychology - 18.05.2010
Creativity linked to mental health
Creativity linked to mental health
New research shows a possible explanation for the link between mental health and creativity. By studying receptors in the brain, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to show that the dopamine system in healthy, highly creative people is similar in some respects to that seen in people with schizophrenia.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2010
Genetics of children's brain tumour unlocked
Genetics of children’s brain tumour unlocked
PA111/10 Researchers have identified an important cancer gene that could lead to more effective drugs being developed to fight paediatric high grade glioma, a disease which currently has a poor prognosis. The discovery, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology , was one of a number of significant genetic differences found between the adult and youth form of the disease.

Health - 17.05.2010
Drug test offers hope for Hep C patients
Scientists at the University have developed a laboratory technique that allows hepatitis C drugs to be tested for effectiveness on a particular individual before they are prescribed. It will also help to monitor whether and when the virus becomes resistant to drugs and provide the means to evaluate the effectiveness of switching to other antiviral medicines.

Health - Chemistry - 13.05.2010
Tissue engineers create a new way to assemble artificial tissues
Tissue engineers create a new way to assemble artificial tissues
Stanford team wins $200,000 MIT Clean Energy Prize with revolutionary electrode design to improve solar panel performance Researchers at the MIT-Harvard Division of Health Sciences and Technology built this tubular tissue by encasing cells in polymer "bricks" and attaching them to a tube-shaped template.

Health - 13.05.2010
Virtual reality illusions: the medical and scientific benefits
Virtual reality illusions: the medical and scientific benefits
Is it possible to have the illusion that your body has changed radically, or that a different body is your body? Mel Slater, Professor of Virtual Environments at UCL Computer Science, describes the findings and scientific applications of research he has conducted into the phenomenon of 'body transfer' in virtual reality, published today in PLoS ONE .

Health - 12.05.2010
UCL study: Overtime 'bad for your heart'
UCL study: Overtime ’bad for your heart’
Working overtime is bad for the heart according to the results from a long-running UCL-led study of more than 10,000 civil servants in London. The research, published online today in the European Heart Journal , found that, compared with people who did not work overtime, people who worked three or more hours longer than a normal, seven-hour day had a 60% higher risk of heart-related problems such as death due to heart disease, non-fatal heart attacks and angina.

Health - Chemistry - 12.05.2010
UCL team finds new ways to improve cervical cancer screening
UCL team finds new ways to improve cervical cancer screening
The research, led by Dr Daniel Ndisang (UCL Institute of Child Health) and made possible by funding from the Association for International Research (AICR), could significantly reduce the death rate from the devastating disease. Cervical cancer accounts for about one in 10 female cancer deaths worldwide each year.

Health - 12.05.2010
Study shows dental link with diabetes
Researchers have found that reducing inflammation of the gums in people with diabetes can help lower the risk of serious complications associated with the condition, such as eye problems and heart disease. The study - led by the University - analysed the findings of previous research into the link between diabetes and serious gum disease - known as periodontal disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2010
New hope for better treatment for a rising cancer
New hope for better treatment for a rising cancer
PA 109/10 Poor diet, too much alcohol, smoking and increasing obesity could be leading to an epidemic of oesophageal and upper stomach cancer, according to a leading UK team of specialists at The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals. The Nottingham Gastro-Oesophageal Cancer Research Group has been carrying out intensive research over the past five years to try to improve the treatment of this cancer.