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Health - 13.06.2011
Cancer survivors spend more on health care
University Park, Pa. Approximately 12 million people in the United States are cancer survivors. On average, their medical care costs $4,000 to $5,000 more annually than the care of people who have never had cancer, according to Penn State researchers. Those who are treated for and survive cancer are susceptible to later health complications and their total medical expenses average about $9,300 per year.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.06.2011
Researchers find new 'molecular motors' that bacteria use to transport proteins
Joshua Shaevitz , an assistant professor from the Department of Physics and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, along with Mingzhai Sun, a postdoctoral associate at Princeton, and scientists from the Université Aix-Marseille in France, have discovered a new type of molecular machine used by bacteria for intracellular protein transport and gliding motility.

Health - Chemistry - 12.06.2011
Nanoparticles may help inhibit Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Nanoparticles of the right dimensions and shape may be the key in combating the plaque that destroys neurons and leads to symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new report shows. University of Michigan chemical engineering professor Nicholas Kotov says the nanotechnology means can attract and capture the longer fibrils that are known to form plaque related to neurodegenerative disorders.

Psychology - Health - 11.06.2011
3-D movie shows what happens in the brain as it loses consciousness
3-D movie shows what happens in the brain as it loses consciousness
University of Manchester researchers have for the first time been able to watch what happens to the brain as it loses consciousness. Using sophisticated imaging equipment they have constructed a 3-D movie of the brain as it changes while an anaesthetic drug takes effect.

Health - 10.06.2011
Heart drug 'safe for kidney patients'
Heart drug 'safe for kidney patients'
Health Jonathan Wood | 10 Jun 11 The full results of a trial show that people with chronic kidney disease can reduce their heart risk by taking a combination drug that lowers levels of 'bad' cholesterol. Taking cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins to combat heart disease is pretty standard in people without kidney problems.

Mathematics - Health - 10.06.2011
Imperial is top in Europe for maths, according to international ranking
Imperial is top in Europe for maths, according to international ranking
by Simon Levey 10 June 2011 A recent ranking of university mathematics departments has listed Imperial College London as having the most influential mathematics research of any institution in Europe. Academic publishers Thomson-Reuters created the new chart by establishing how much the research findings of scientists in the world's top 200 institutions influenced research by others outside of that institution.

Health - Psychology - 10.06.2011
Meditation back to basics
Meditation back to basics
Fulltime workers who used a traditional 'silent' form of meditation became much less stressed and depressed compared to more conventional approaches to relaxation or even placebo, according to a paper published today in the online journal Evidence Based Complementary Medicine , a leading publication in its field.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.06.2011
Nail defects reveal mechanisms for organ formation
Nail defects reveal mechanisms for organ formation
[NEWS 10 June 2011] An international research consortium including teams from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institutet has identified the cause of serious defects in human finger and toenail formation as disrupted signalling between cells in the skin. Their finds are presented in the June issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.06.2011
Understanding synergy between two bacteria could improve fuel cells, therapies
Understanding synergy between two bacteria could improve fuel cells, therapies
Like mutual back-scratching, two common bacteria involved in what was thought to be only a marginally important relationship actually help each other thrive when grown together in bioreactors, Cornell scientists have discovered. Understanding this symbiotic relationship could lead to, for example, more efficient microbiology-based fuel cells or better methods for preventing such natural processes as rust corrosion.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.06.2011
Eating dirt may protect against pathogens and toxins
Eating dirt may protect against pathogens and toxins
The phrase "eat dirt" takes on a whole new meaning when used by biologists, who have widely observed that humans, birds and mammals all engage in geophagy. A new Cornell study concludes that in humans, it's best explained as providing protection from dietary chemicals, parasites and pathogens. So said lead author Sera Young, Ph.D.

Health - History / Archeology - 09.06.2011
New genetic technique converts skin cells into brain cells
A research breakthrough has proven that it is possible to reprogram mature cells from human skin directly into brain cells, without passing through the stem cell stage. The unexpectedly simple technique involves activating three genes in the skin cells; genes which are already known to be active in the formation of brain cells at the foetal stage.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.06.2011
Protein presence could help diagnose cancer
Cancers of the gut, stomach and pancreas could be detected much sooner with a simple urine test, research suggests. University researchers have identified key proteins in the urine of patients with advanced cancers. The findings could help the detection of these cancers in people who have not yet started to show symptoms of the disease.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.06.2011
Will rising BMIs reverse heart attack decline?
Will rising BMIs reverse heart attack decline?
UCL Epidemiology & Public Health UCL Primary Care & Population Health European Heart Journal Medical Research Council British Heart Foundation Better control of cholesterol levels and blood pressure and a decline in smoking have contributed to a 74% drop in the risk of heart attack among nearly 10,000 civil servants working in London over a 20-year period, according to new research from the UCL-led Whitehall II study.

Health - 09.06.2011
Two million had swine flu, study shows
The swine flu outbreak of winter 2009-2010 was much more widespread than was realised, University research shows. Blood samples taken from Scottish adults in March last year at the end of the H1N1 flu season showed that almost half were carrying antibodies to the virus. Most of the 44 per cent who tested positive had contracted swine flu, although some had acquired immunity from a previous bout of flu, or had been vaccinated.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.06.2011
Over consumption of sugary drinks dulls taste buds
Over consumption of sugary drinks dulls taste buds
The research by academics at the universities of Bristol and Bangor has shown for the first time that overweight and obese people have a dulled sensitivity to the sweetness of soft drinks but an enhanced subconscious liking of sweet food. The findings also found that even if people are not overweight, drinking two sugary drinks a day for just four weeks is sufficient to both dull sensitivity to the taste sensation, and increase preference for sweeter tastes, particularly in people who did not already have a 'sweet tooth'.

Health - 08.06.2011
Banning federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research would derail related work, U-M researcher and colleagues conclude
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Banning federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research would have "disastrous consequences" on the study of a promising and increasingly popular new stem cell type that is not derived from human embryos, according to a University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues.

History / Archeology - Health - 08.06.2011
Archaeologists discover skeleton in doctor's garden
Archaeologists discover skeleton in doctor’s garden
A skeleton, possibly dating from Roman times, has been unearthed by archaeologists from the University of Bristol during a dig in the garden of vaccination pioneer Dr Edward Jenner in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. The archaeologists, led by Professor Mark Horton and Dr Stuart Prior , have been excavating part of the garden of The Chantry, the former country home of vaccination pioneer, Dr Edward Jenner (1749-1823), during a series of annual digs since 2007.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.06.2011
Turning off cancer’s growth signals
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. One hallmark of cancer cells is uncontrollable growth, provoked by inappropriate signals that instruct the cells to keep dividing. Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have now identified a new way to shut off one of the proteins that spreads those signals ' a receptor known as HER3.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.06.2011
Gene variant linked to IBS
Gene variant linked to IBS
[NEWS, 7 June 2011] An international team of researchers, lead from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, have found that a variant of a gene called TNFSF15 is significantly associated with increased risk of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), the most common gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. The findings are presented in the scientific journal GUT.

Health - 07.06.2011
Increased risk of heart attack after early removal of appendix or tonsils
Surgical removal of the tonsils or appendix in young people is associated with an increased relative risk of early heart attack, according to a novel study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet. The study, which is published online in the European Heart Journal, examined the national health records of every Swedish resident born between 1955 and 1970 and identified each one who had had tonsils and/or appendix removed.