news

« BACK

Health



Results 15421 - 15440 of 15723.


Health - 08.04.2010
UCL trial: treating rare cancers differently
UCL trial: treating rare cancers differently
The merits of a new treatment method for advanced gall bladder and bile duct cancer, trialled by the Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre, have been published today. Advanced gall bladder and bile duct cancer, for which patients currently can?t have operations, together affect fewer than 2,000 people per year in the UK, making trials harder to run.

Health - Psychology - 08.04.2010
Children of combat-deployed parents show increased worries, even after parent returns
The current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in extended and repeated combat-related deployments of U.S. military service members. While much has been reported about the problems, both physical and psychological, many bring back with them, new research out of UCLA shows that the family back home can have issues as well.

Health - 08.04.2010
Cancer patients to benefit from team working
Cancer patients to benefit from team working
Cancer patients in England will soon benefit from improvements made to multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) as a result of recent research into their effectiveness by researchers from King's Health Partners Academic Health Sciences Centre (KHP). Researchers from King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, both part of KHP, were involved in the initial research funded by Cancer Research UK and recently published in the British Medical Journal .

Health - 08.04.2010
Improving child health policy across Europe
Improving child health policy across Europe
Dr Patricia Lucas in the School for Policy Studies is leading a new three-year research project to develop a strategy to ensure that key messages and findings from current research into child health are being transmitted effectively to policy makers across Europe. Research groups across Europe have conducted many longitudinal studies of cohorts of children, collecting and mapping health data from birth across their life course.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.04.2010
Brain Researcher Defies Conventional Wisdom on Estrogen
When Dominique Toran-Allerand started studying the effects of estrogen in the brain some 40 years ago, her research was considered so unconventional as to be unbelievable. One of her first papers, she recalls, was met with a four-page single-spaced rejection letter from the Journal of Brain Research .

Life Sciences - Health - 07.04.2010
Low birth weight link to diabetes
A team, including experts from the University, found two genetic regions that influence birth-weight, one of which is also associated with type 2 diabetes. It has been known for some time that small babies are more likely to get the illness and that a mother's diet and nutrition affect her child's weight and future risk of disease, in a process known as "programming".

Health - 07.04.2010
Autism is the grandmother's age significant?
Autism is the grandmother’s age significant?
A report just published in the online journal, PLoS ONE, indicates that the mothers of children with an autistic spectrum disorder were themselves more likely to have been born to older mothers. These findings could open up new avenues in autism research. There has been much discussion as to whether there is a connection between older mothers or older fathers and children with autism or an autistic spectrum disorder.  Some studies find a maternal age effect, others a paternal age effect, and some find both factors operating.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2010
Why small babies are more likely to develop diabetes in later life
Why small babies are more likely to develop diabetes in later life
New research uncovers two genetic regions that influence birth weight. One of the regions is also associated with type 2 diabetes, which helps to explain why small babies have higher rates of diabetes in later life. A large international team of researchers, including scientists from several UK and international centres (and including a group from the University of Bristol), has discovered two gene regions that affect a baby's size at birth.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2010
Gene links lower birth weight and type 2 diabetes
Gene links lower birth weight and type 2 diabetes
Two gene regions that influence a baby's weight at birth have been identified by a large international team of researchers, including scientists from Oxford University. One of the genes is also associated with type 2 diabetes, which helps to explain why small babies have higher rates of diabetes in later life.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2010
Gene provides a link between lower birth weight and type 2 diabetes
Gene provides a link between lower birth weight and type 2 diabetes
Gene provides a link between lower birth weight and type 2 diabetes Team discovers two gene regions that affect a baby's size at birth - News Release New research uncovers two genetic regions that influence birth weight. One of the regions is also associated with type 2 diabetes, which helps to explain why small babies have higher rates of diabetes in later life.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.04.2010
Clue to cause of motor neurone disease revealed in new genetic study
Clue to cause of motor neurone disease revealed in new genetic study
Clue to cause of motor neurone disease revealed in new genetic study Researchers discover a fifth genetic mutation associated with typical motor neurone disease - News Release Researchers have discovered a fifth genetic mutation associated with typical motor neurone disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, that has a similar pathological effect to certain genetic mutations revealed in earlier studies.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.04.2010
Major study into human immune system
Major study into human immune system
Researchers at King's are embarking on a major study to establish for the first time, the baseline of immune function in a large number of individuals, and how this baseline normally responds to a routine environmental stimulus - a vaccination. The study is being carried out by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London) together with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the USA.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.04.2010
Ageing gene found to govern lifespan, immunity and resilience
Scientists at the University of Birmingham funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) have discovered that a gene called DAF-16 is strongly involved in determining the rate of ageing and average lifespan of the laboratory worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and its close evolutionary cousins.

Health - 01.04.2010
Gene therapy boosts recovery from heart attack
Gene therapy boosts recovery from heart attack
Gene therapy could be an effective way to improve survival rates among heart attack patients, new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) suggests.  Academics at the University of Bristol found that boosting levels of a natural growth factor in the heart could help the muscle to recover after a heart attack.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2010
Disruption in Brain Connection Linked to Genetic Defect in Schizophrenia
NEW YORK, NY, March 31, 2010 - In what may provide the most compelling evidence to date, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have illuminated how a genetic variant may lead to schizophrenia by causing a disruption in communication between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex regions of the brain, areas believed to be responsible for carrying out working memory.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2010
Duplicated DNA unlikely to play role in common disease
Duplicated DNA unlikely to play role in common disease
Chunks of DNA that can frequently be duplicated or missing in our genomes are unlikely to play a major role in many common conditions, a study of the genetics of diseases including diabetes, heart disease and bipolar disorder has found. This type of genetic variation had been proposed as a possible source of some of the inherited risk of developing these conditions.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 31.03.2010
Diet to reduce cardiovascular disease risk
Diet to reduce cardiovascular disease risk
Academics at King's will be undertaking a study on changing diet on risk of cardiovascular disease funded by the Food Standards Agency. The study will test the extent to which a cardioprotective dietary pattern lowers risk in middle-age and older people. The project leader Professor Tom Sanders, Head of the Nutritional Sciences Division at King's comments: 'Dietary patterns are linked to risk of heart disease and stroke.

Health - Chemistry - 31.03.2010
Researchers demonstrate breakthrough in early detection and monitoring of chronic diseases
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (03/31/2010) —A University of Minnesota research team, led by electrical and computer engineering professor Jian-Ping Wang and medicinal chemistry associate professor Chengguo Xing, has demonstrated a magnetic nanotechnology-based diagnostic technique that can accurately identify disease biomarkers and detect diseases in their early stages in unprocessed human blood, saliva or urine.

Health - 31.03.2010
Non-physician surgeons save lives in low-income countries
Every year, some 7.5 million mothers and new-borns die during pregnancy or childbirth, almost all of whom are in low and middle-income countries. One reason for this is the lack of trained medical staff, particularly doctors. A doctoral thesis from Karolinska Institutet now shows that a solution could be the training of nurses in caesarean sections and other life-saving surgery.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 30.03.2010
New test assesses impact of gas drilling, pipeline construction on soil health
The construction necessary to extract natural gas from the Marcellus Shale in southern New York could affect the soil around drilling sites and pipeline right-of-ways, says a Cornell soil expert who has helped develop a new soil health test to assess such impacts. "Soil is sensitive to heavy construction, and while there are a lot of construction standards and practices, there isn't really a standardized way to measure construction impacts on soil behavior," said Robert Schindelbeck, a Cornell extension associate in crop and soil sciences and member of the Cornell Soil Health Team.