news

« BACK

Health



Results 15441 - 15460 of 15722.


Health - 29.03.2010
Tiny gold probes to help track disease
Once the probe is inside a cell, laser light shone on to it is absorbed then re-emitted, causing nearby proteins in the cell to vibrate according to their shape. Further studies will look at diseases linked to the immune system in the first instance, but researchers say the technique has potential to help doctors diagnose and monitor a range of conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.03.2010
Alzheimer’s rat created for human research
McGill University researcher and international collaborators genetically manipulate rat to create ideal model for studying Alzheimer's disease in humans Prof. Claudio Cuello at McGill University and his collaborators have genetically manipulated rats that can emulate Alzheimer's disease in humans, enabling research that will include the development of new treatments.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.03.2010
Drug-producing yeast are not equal
Drug-producing yeast are not equal
MIT chemical engineers have shown that some populations of yeast engineered to produce drugs secrete large quantities of the drug, while others lag behind, even though the yeast are genetically identical. Drug companies often use yeast to manufacture drugs, especially proteins such as antibodies and enzymes.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.03.2010
New microscopy technique offers close-up, real-time view of cellular phenomena
MIT analysis suggests wind turbines could cause temperatures to rise and fall New microscopy technique offers close-up, real-time view of cellular phenomena This image, taken with atomic force microscopy, shows E. coli bacteria after they have been exposed to the antimicrobial peptide CM15. The peptides have begun destroying the bacteria?s cell walls.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.03.2010
Gene test helps target cancer therapy
The findings - presented by researchers at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Spain - mean doctors should be able to tailor treatment to the patients who will benefit and avoid giving toxic drugs to those that will not be helped. By conducting a review of four large breast cancer trials, the researchers found that an abnormality on chromosome 17, called CEP17, is a "highly significant indicator" that the tumour will respond to chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.03.2010
Insulin-like signal needed to keep stem cells alive in adult brain
Insulin-like signal needed to keep stem cells alive in adult brain
BERKELEY — University of California, Berkeley, biologists have found a signal that keeps stem cells alive in the adult brain, providing a focus for scientists looking for ways to re-grow or re-seed stem cells in the brain to allow injured areas to repair themselves. Mushroom bodies (red), which are the center of learning and memory in the brain, from two adult fruit flies.

Health - Physics - 25.03.2010
Study provides proof in humans of RNA interference using targeted nanoparticles
Study provides proof in humans of RNA interference using targeted nanoparticles
A team of researchers and clinicians from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the California Institute of Technology has published the first proof that a targeted nanoparticle ? used as an experimental therapeutic and injected directly into a patient's bloodstream ? can navigate into tumors, deliver double-stranded small interfering RNAs and turn off an important cancer gene.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.03.2010
Inflammation in body fat is not only pernicious
It has been a common opinion that inflammation in adipose tissue may cause insulin resistance, and thereby type 2 diabetes. However, recent research from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, question the theory that inflammation in the body fat is only pernicious.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.03.2010
New Tissue-Hugging Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity in Unprecedented Detail
PHILADELPHIA – A team of cardiologists, materials scientists, and bioengineers have created and tested a new type of implantable device for measuring the heart’s electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over current devices. The new device represents the first use of flexible silicon technology for a medical application.

Health - Earth Sciences - 23.03.2010
Researchers Focus on Psychological Care for Haiti's Earthquake Survivors
In the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster, addressing the physical needs of survivors—providing emergency medical care, food and water—can make the difference between life and death. But in the weeks, months and sometimes years that follow, the mental health effects may linger well after physical wounds have healed.

Health - Administration - 23.03.2010
Improving health and lives for people with learning disabilities
Improving health and lives for people with learning disabilities
It is well known that people with learning disabilities have poorer health and die younger than other people. An investigation into the standards of care for people with learning disabilities was announced today [Tuesday 23 March] by the Department of Health .  The Confidential Inquiry will find out what can be changed to improve the health of people with learning disabilities to enable them to live longer.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2010
New cancer biomarker may herald personalised medicine
New cancer biomarker may herald personalised medicine
Scientists at Oxford University have led a study that shows how simple diagnostic tests to identify which patients will respond to which cancer drugs can be developed, potentially ushering in a new era of personalised cancer medicine. The Oxford researchers, with colleagues at the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas, Houston, confirm their approach works in results published in the journal PNAS.

Health - Chemistry - 22.03.2010
Washington Post editor David E. Hoffman talks about new book, The Dead Hand
LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 22, 2010—David E. Hoffman will present his new book, The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy , during a talk at 5:15 p.m. March 25 at the Bradbury Science Museum in downtown Los Alamos. Following his talk, "Gorbachev and Reagan: New Evidence on the End of the Cold War, Strategic Defense and Biological Weapons," Hoffman, a contributing editor to the Washington Post and formerly the paper's Moscow bureau chief, will sign copies of the book in the Otowi Station Bookstore and Science Museum Shop.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 22.03.2010
A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain
A sweet problem: Princeton researchers find that high-fructose corn syrup prompts considerably more weight gain
A Princeton University research team has demonstrated that all sweeteners are not equal when it comes to weight gain: Rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained significantly more weight than those with access to table sugar, even when their overall caloric intake was the same.  In addition to causing significant weight gain in lab animals, long-term consumption of high-fructose corn syrup also led to abnormal increases in body fat, especially in the abdomen, and a rise in circulating blood fats called triglycerides.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2010
Sex on the brain: gene key to fruit fly gender
Sex on the brain: gene key to fruit fly gender
Researchers from Oxford University and the University of Glasgow have shown that a gene known as ' doublesex ' ( dsx ) plays a role in determining different brain circuitry in male and female fruit flies, resulting in gender-specific behaviours. The courtship behaviour of the fruit fly has long been used to study the relationship between genes and behaviour.

Health - Physics - 20.03.2010
Caltech-led Team Provides Proof in Humans of RNA Interference Using Targeted Nanoparticles
Caltech-led Team Provides Proof in Humans of RNA Interference Using Targeted Nanoparticles
PASADENA, Calif.—A California Institute of Technology (Caltech)-led team of researchers and clinicians has published the first proof that a targeted nanoparticle—used as an experimental therapeutic and injected directly into a patient's bloodstream—can traffic into tumors, deliver double-stranded small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and turn off an important cancer gene using a mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi).

Health - 19.03.2010
Radiotherapy can cause lasting vascular disease
For an as yet unknown reason, cancer radiotherapy can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, a problem that is growing as more and more people survive their cancer diagnosis. New research from Karolinska Institutet now suggests that sustained inflammation induced by post-radiotherapy changes in the gene expression in the arteries could be the cause.

Health - Social Sciences - 18.03.2010
Call for European Cystic Fibrosis healthcare gap to be closed
Call for European Cystic Fibrosis healthcare gap to be closed
A healthcare gap amounting to a ?death sentence? for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) children born in Eastern Europe must be closed say researchers from the EuroCareCF Coordination Action for Cystic Fibrosis. A new study led by the University of Dundee and published today in The Lancet, has found that CF patients in Eastern European countries die far younger than in other, wealthier, EU countries.

Health - Economics / Business - 18.03.2010
Colon cancer treatment for older patients often less aggressive than recommended, study finds
New results from a major initiative on the quality of cancer care in the United States show that patients with a common type of colon cancer, especially older patients, often do not receive the aggressive treatment with chemotherapy that research shows is associated with better survival. Led by researchers from UCLA and the RAND Corp., a nonprofit research organization, the study is among the first to track how findings from specialty research trials are applied in diverse practices in the community, where a wider variety of patients are treated.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.03.2010
Study Finds Bacteria Divide Like Clockwork
A team of researchers from UC San Diego and MIT has shown how cell division in a type of bacteria known as cyanobacteria is controlled by the same kind of circadian rhythms that govern human sleep patterns. The scientists? findings are detailed in paper in the March 19 issue of the journal Science. Previous studies have shown that even though cyanobacteria do not 'sleep' in the same way that humans do, they cycle through active and resting periods on a 24-hour schedule.