news

« BACK

Health



Results 15441 - 15460 of 16709.


Life Sciences - Health - 29.07.2011
Plant immunity discovery boosts chances of disease-resistant crops
Researchers have opened up the black box of plant immune system genetics, boosting our ability to produce disease- and pest-resistant crops in the future. An international consortium of researchers, including Professor Jim Beynon at the University of Warwick, has used a systems biology approach to uncover a huge network of genes that all play a part in defending plants against attacks from pests and diseases - a discovery that will make it possible to explore new avenues for crop improvement and in doing so ensure future food security.

Health - Economics / Business - 28.07.2011
Laws that encourage healthier lifestyles protect lives and save the NHS money
Research: Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of cardiovascular disease prevention in whole populations: modelling study The introduction of legislation that restricts unhealthy food, for example by reducing salt content and eliminating industrial trans fats, would prevent thousands of cases of heart disease in England and Wales and save the NHS millions of pounds, finds research published on bmj.com | today.

Health - Psychology - 28.07.2011
Lifestyle choices keep health all in the mind
Lifestyle choices keep health all in the mind
Physical activity and being a volunteer assist mental wellbeing, a new ACT research report has found. Prepared by the Centre for Mental Health Research at ANU and the ACT Government Health Directorate, Mental Health and Wellbeing in the ACT showcases results from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Project.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.07.2011
Researchers Increase the Potency of HIV-Battling Proteins
Researchers Increase the Potency of HIV-Battling Proteins
If one is good, two can sometimes be better. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have certainly found this to be the case when it comes to a small HIV-fighting protein. The protein, called cyanovirin-N (CV-N), is produced by a type of blue-green algae and has gained attention for its ability to ward off several diseases caused by viruses, including HIV and influenza.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.07.2011
Beef up your muscles, reduce your diabetes risk
More muscle mass — and not just less body fat — is critical to lowering your risk for type 2 diabetes, a new UCLA study suggests.

Health - Earth Sciences - 27.07.2011
Home is where the healthy meal is
New study finds home setting nurtures better food choices Can a cozy dining table and nice music prompt people to reach for the greens and go light on dessert? So suggests a new study probing why people tend to eat more-nutritious meals at home than away from home. The findings, based on data from 160 women who reported their emotional states before and after meals, add to mounting evidence that psychological factors may help override humans? wired-in preference for high-fat, sugary foods.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.07.2011
Low income and poor diet linked to accelerated ageing
A new study of the DNA of people living in Glasgow suggests that earning less than the average wage and eating an unhealthy diet could accelerate the ageing process. The study, conducted by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Glasgow Centre for Population Health, compared the length of telomeres in blood samples taken from 382 Glaswegians from the most and least deprived parts of the city.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.07.2011
Gastric bypass surgery changes food preferences
Gastric bypass surgery changes food preferences
Gastric bypass surgery alters people's food preferences so that they eat less high fat food, according to a new study led by scientists at Imperial College London. The findings, published in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative, and Comparative Physiology , suggest a new mechanism by which some types of bariatric surgery lead to long-term weight loss.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.07.2011
Think Healthy, Eat Healthy: Caltech Scientists Show Link Between Attention, Self-Control
Think Healthy, Eat Healthy: Caltech Scientists Show Link Between Attention, Self-Control
PASADENA, Calif.—You're trying to decide what to eat for dinner. Should it be the chicken and broccoli' The super-sized fast-food burger? Skip it entirely and just get some Rocky Road' Making that choice, it turns out, is a complex neurological exercise. But, according to researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), it's one that can be influenced by a simple shifting of attention toward the healthy side of life.

Chemistry - Health - 25.07.2011
Pocket chemistry: DNA helps glucose meters measure more than sugar
Pocket chemistry: DNA helps glucose meters measure more than sugar
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Glucose meters aren't just for diabetics anymore. Thanks to University of Illinois chemists, they can be used as simple, portable, inexpensive meters for a number of target molecules in blood, serum, water or food.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.07.2011
First targeted treatment success for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
First targeted treatment success for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
A team led by scientists at UCL, funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and AVI BioPharma, have made an important breakthrough in the development of a treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Together with the MDEX Consortium, chaired by Professor Francesco Muntoni (UCL Institute for Child Health), the group show in a paper published in The Lancet today that a gene-based drug treatment was effective in restoring the dystrophin protein that is missing in sufferers of DMD, in seven out of 19 trial participants.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.07.2011
Life scientists use novel technique to produce genetic map for African Americans
Life scientists use novel technique to produce genetic map for African Americans
UCLA life scientists and colleagues have produced one of the first high-resolution genetic maps for African American populations.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.07.2011
New glandular fever, genes and MS link
New glandular fever, genes and MS link
Scientists working on the Australian-based Ausimmune Study have discovered that a past infection with glandular fever, also known as the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), combined with genetic variations in the immune system can greatly increase a person's risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). Associate Professor Robyn Lucas from the College of Medicine, Biology and Environment at the Australian National University said the research could lead to new therapeutic and preventative strategies for MS directed at relevant components of the immune system.

Health - Psychology - 21.07.2011
Positive thinking: Optimism lowers risk of having stroke
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A positive outlook on life might lower the risk of having a stroke, according to a new University of Michigan study. A nationally representative group of 6,044 adults over age 50 rated their optimism levels on a 16-point scale. Each point increase in optimism corresponded to a 9 percent decrease in acute stroke risk over a two-year follow-up period.

Health - 20.07.2011
Ancient footprints show human-like walking began nearly four million years ago
Scientists have found that ancient footprints in Laetoli, Tanzania, show that human-like features of the feet and gait existed almost two million years earlier than previously thought. Many earlier studies have suggested that the characteristics of the human foot, such as the ability to push off the ground with the big toe, and a fully upright bipedal gait, emerged in early Homo , approximately 1.9 million years-ago.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.07.2011
New research to investigate brain responsiveness to food and the link with type 2 diabetes
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are set to monitor brain reactions when exposed to images of food in a study which will provide an insight into the difficulties of weight and diet control faced by young diabetes patients. Brain reactions to pictures of different types of food will be compared between teenagers who are a healthy weight, teenagers who are obese, and teenagers who have type 2 diabetes.

Earth Sciences - Health - 19.07.2011
Ancient footprints show human-like walking began nearly four million years ago
Computer simulation was used to predict the footprints that would have been formed by the likely printmaker, a species called Australopithecus afarensis Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that ancient footprints in Laetoli, Tanzania, show that human-like features of the feet and gait existed almost two million years earlier than previously thought.

Health - Economics / Business - 19.07.2011
Trouble forming sentences may be early Alzheimer's marker
Trouble forming sentences may be early Alzheimer’s marker
Having trouble finding the right word to say is a known side effect of healthy aging. But older adults with early Alzheimer's disease may find it especially difficult not only to find words but also to construct complex sentences, finds a Cornell pilot study.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.07.2011
Suicide and homicide rates in mental health patients revealed
Suicide and homicide rates in mental health patients revealed
Suicide rates among people with mental illness in England and Wales have fallen over the last decade, latest figures show. The 2011 Annual Report published today (Tuesday, 19 July) by The University of Manchester's National Confidential Inquiry (NCI) into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness reveals: Patient suicides have fallen from a peak of 1,315 in 2004 to 1,196 in 2008.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.07.2011
New lung cancer gene found
Cancer biologists identify a driving force behind the spread of an aggressive type of lung cancer. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. A major challenge for cancer biologists is figuring out which among the hundreds of genetic mutations found in a cancer cell are most important for driving the cancer's spread. Using a new technique called whole-genome profiling, MIT scientists have now pinpointed a gene that appears to drive progression of small cell lung cancer, an aggressive form of lung cancer accounting for about 15 percent of lung cancer cases.