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Health - Life Sciences - 15.04.2011
Researchers discover general recipe for making antimicrobial agents that kill bacteria
FINDINGS: Many antimicrobial peptides in our immune system kill bacteria by punching holes in their membranes. Scientists have been researching antimicrobial peptides for more than 30 years, and there is currently a large effort to mimic their antimicrobial action in order to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria and emerging pathogens.

Health - 15.04.2011
Experimental drug slows ovarian cancer growth, increases survival in mouse model
Experimental drug slows ovarian cancer growth, increases survival in mouse model
An experimental drug that blocks two points of a crucial cancer cell signaling pathway inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cells and significantly increases survival in an ovarian cancer mouse model, a study at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found. The drug, called NVP-BEZ235, also inhibits growth of ovarian cancer cells that have become resistant to the conventional treatment with platinum chemotherapy and helps to resensitize the cancer cells to the therapy.

Health - 15.04.2011
Childhood eczema and hay fever leads to adult allergic asthma
Children who have eczema, particularly when occurring with hay fever, are nine times more likely to develop allergic asthma in their 40s, a new study reveals. The study was conducted by the University of Melbourne, the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Menzies Research Institute and Monash University.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2011
Genes that control ’ageing’ steroid identified
Eight genes which control levels of the main steroid produced by the adrenal gland, believed to play a role in ageing and longevity, have been uncovered by an international consortium of scientists, co-led by King's College London. Crucially, some of these eight genetic regions are also associated with other important diseases of ageing, including type 2 diabetes and lymphoma.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2011
Scientists identify new stimulant that may boost vaccinations at birth
Scientists identify new stimulant that may boost vaccinations at birth
Adapted from a news release issued by the Medical Research Council. Wednesday 13 April 2011 Scientists have found a new group of proteins that could boost the effectiveness of vaccinations, making it much easier to immmunise newborn African children.

Health - Environment - 14.04.2011
Precipitation, predators may be key in ecological regulation of infectious disease
A little information can go a surprisingly long way when it comes to understanding rodent-borne infectious disease, as shown by a new study led by John Orrock from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The researchers studied wild deer mouse populations on the Channel Islands off the southern coast of California, which carry a variant of hantavirus called Sin Nombre virus.

Health - 14.04.2011
Illusion can halve the pain of osteoarthritis, scientists say
Illusion can halve the pain of osteoarthritis, scientists say
A serendipitous discovery by academics at The University of Nottingham has shown that a simple illusion can significantly reduce — and in some cases even temporarily eradicate — arthritic pain in the hand. By tricking the brain into believing that the painful part of the hand is being stretched or shrunk, the researchers were able to halve the pain felt by 85 per cent of sufferers they tested.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.04.2011
Loch fossils show life harnessed sun and sex early on
Loch fossils show life harnessed sun and sex early on
Remote lochs along the west coast of Scotland are turning up new evidence about the origins of life on land. A team of scientists exploring rocks around Loch Torridon have discovered the remarkably preserved remains of organisms that once lived on the bottom of ancient lake beds as long as a billion (1000 million) years ago.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2011
Comparing complex protein networks in cells could lead to new insights in biology
Comparing complex protein networks in cells could lead to new insights in biology
By Colin Smith Scientists have developed a way of studying cells by comparing how proteins inside them bind with one another. The team, from Imperial College London, have developed an algorithm called MI-GRAAL that enables them to study protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, where a cell's proteins bind together in complex networks so that they can carry out their functions.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2011
Scientists recreate brain cells from skin cells to study schizophrenia
A team of scientists at Penn State, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and other institutions have developed a method for recreating a schizophrenic patient's own brain cells, which then can be studied safely and effectively in a Petri dish. The method brings researchers a step closer to understanding the biological underpinnings of schizophrenia.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2011
Filters that reduce brain clutter identified
McGill researchers suggest malfunctions in neurons that filter visual information may be responsible for diseases such as ADHD and schizophrenia Until now, it has been assumed that people with diseases like ADHD, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia - all of whom characteristically report symptoms of 'brain clutter' - may suffer from anomalies in the brain's prefrontal cortex.

Health - 12.04.2011
Filtering fumes could reduce heart attacks
A simple diesel exhaust trap could reduce the risk of heart attacks in traffic-heavy areas. University scientists have shown that 'particle traps' dramatically reduce the negative effects of diesel fumes on the heart and circulation and might reduce heart attack risk. Study The researchers, funded by the British Heart Foundation, examined the effects of diesel fumes at levels common in heavy traffic on the roads of the UK's largest cities.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2011
Scientists identify a surprising new source of cancer stem cells
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Whitehead Institute researchers have discovered that a differentiated cell type found in breast tissue can spontaneously convert to a stem-cell-like state, the first time such behavior has been observed in mammalian cells. These results refute scientific dogma, which states that differentiation is a one-way path; once cells specialize, they cannot return to the flexible stem-cell state on their own.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.04.2011
Loch fossils show life harnessed sun and sex early on
Loch fossils show life harnessed sun and sex early on
Loch fossils show life harnessed sun and sex early on Remote lochs along the west coast of Scotland are turning up new evidence about the origins of life on land. A team of scientists from the University of Sheffield, the University of Oxford and Boston College, who are exploring rocks around Loch Torridon, have discovered the remarkably preserved remains of organisms that once lived on the bottom of ancient lake beds as long as a billion (1,000 million) years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2011
Insights gained from growing cold-causing virus on sinus tissue
Media Inquiries news [a] uwhealth (p) org Related Information Dr. James Gern's Laboratory For Patients Pediatric Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Stay Connected Madison - Using sinus tissue removed during surgery at University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics , researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison have managed to grow a recently discovered species of human rhinovirus (HRV), the most frequent cause of the common cold, in culture.

Health - Psychology - 11.04.2011
Drop in positive emotions -- rather than jump in negative -- linked to poorer health in widowhood
Drop in positive emotions -- rather than jump in negative -- linked to poorer health in widowhood
When a spouse or life partner dies, the survivor experiences more illness, mental health issues and earlier death than non-widowed counterparts, research has found. Now, a new Cornell prospective study reports that the culprit is not bereavement's negative emotions - grief, distress, fear and anger - that disrupt the stress response system and cause harmful biological changes.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2011
New treatment can destroy prostate cancer from within
New treatment can destroy prostate cancer from within
New treatment can destroy prostate cancer from within A `Trojan´ system developed by researchers at the Universities of Sheffield and York attacks cancerous cells from within and potentially offers a safer treatment for prostate tumours. The technique involves the use of a patient´s own white blood cells called macrophages to deliver an oncolytic viruses to tumours that is tailored specifically to grow in and destroy the cancer cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2011
Vaccine for transplant infection shows promise
Vaccine for transplant infection shows promise
A major infectious problem after organ transplantation, cytomegalovirus (CMV), could potentially be targeted with a vaccine, according to new results from a phase II clinical trial led by scientists from UCL and doctors at the Royal Free Hospital. The results of this Phase II proof-of-concept study, published in The Lancet today, show that a vaccine preparation moderated the severity of CMV infection in patients waiting for kidney and liver transplants and, in some cases, may have interrupted transmission of the virus from donor to recipient.

Psychology - Health - 08.04.2011
How images of wealth and success can negatively shape body image
How images of wealth and success can negatively shape body image
How images of wealth and success can negatively shape body image The advert for a facial cream shows a slender woman with perfect skin in an exotic holiday location. How does it make you feel? Research has already shown that exposure to images of ultra thin models has a negative impact on women's perception of their own bodies.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2011
Atherosclerotic plaques form during a late and limited time period in life
Atherosclerotic plaques form during a late and limited time period in life
In a new study performed in humans, researchers from Karolinska Institutet have determined the age of atherosclerotic plaques by taking advantage of Carbon-14 (14C) residues in the atmosphere, prevailing after the extensive atomic bomb tests in the 50ties and 60ties. The findings, published in the scientific online journal PLoS ONE, suggest that in most people plaque formation occurs during a relatively short and late time period in life of 3-5 years.