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Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published in PLoS Medicine - News Tuesday 7 December 2010 Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published today in the journal PLoS Medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2010
Living in certain neighborhoods increases the chances older men and women will develop cancer
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Older people who live in racially segregated neighborhoods with high crime rates have a much higher chance of developing cancer than do older people with similar health histories and income levels who live in safer, less segregated neighborhoods. That is one of the key findings of a new study forthcoming in the January 2011 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Health - 07.12.2010
Good grades in high school lead to better health, study finds
The "A" grades that high-schoolers earn aren't just good for making the honor roll — they also make them healthier as adults, too. Studies have long shown that education is linked to better health, but new research by Pamela Herd , an associate professor of public affairs and sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that higher academic performance in high school plays a critical role in better health throughout life.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2010
Forget your previous conceptions about memory
Forget your previous conceptions about memory
Research may shed light on why dementia sufferers have memory difficulties. Memory difficulties such as those seen in dementia may arise because the brain forms incomplete memories that are more easily confused, new research from the University of Cambridge has found. The findings are published today .

Environment - Health - 07.12.2010
Aussies say science knocks sport for six
Aussies say science knocks sport for six
Australians are more interested in science than sport and feel that politicians are failing to listen to the advice of the nation's scientists, according to the latest ANUpoll, released today. The latest ANUpoll looked at public attitudes about science. It found that far from being a nation of sports obsessives, Australians would prefer to hear about health issues, medical discoveries and the environment in their news bulletins.

Health - 07.12.2010
Daily aspirin at low doses reduces cancer deaths
Daily aspirin at low doses reduces cancer deaths
Health 07 Dec 10 A daily low dose of aspirin significantly reduces the number of deaths from a whole range of common cancers, an Oxford University study has found. The 20% drop in all cancer deaths seen in the study adds new evidence to the debate about whether otherwise healthy people in their 40s and 50s should consider taking a low dose of aspirin each day.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.12.2010
Scientists shed light on blood flow problems in dementia
Scientists shed light on blood flow problems in dementia
Press release issued 6 December 2010 Scientists in Bristol have uncovered some of the processes responsible for the blood flow problems connected with Alzheimer's disease. Their findings could see existing drugs used for leaky blood vessels trialled as potential Alzheimer's treatments. Researchers at the University of Bristol's Dementia Research Group supported by the Alzheimer's Research Trust , the UK's leading dementia research charity, investigated problems with the function of blood vessels in the brains of people with Alzheimer's ' a known feature of the disease.

Health - 06.12.2010
How taking an active role in learning enhances memory
How taking an active role in learning enhances memory
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Good news for control freaks! New research confirms that having some authority over how one takes in new information significantly enhances one's ability to remember it. The study, , also offers a first look at the network of brain structures that contribute to this phenomenon. "Having active control over a learning situation is very powerful and we're beginning to understand why," said University of Illinois psychology professor Neal Cohen , who led the study with postdoctoral researcher Joel Voss.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.12.2010
Seeing the world differently
Seeing the world differently
Scientists have shown for the first time that exactly how we see our environment depends on the size of the visual part of our brain. We are all familiar with the idea that our thoughts and emotions differ from one person to another, but most people assume that how we perceive the visual world is usually very similar from person to person.

Health - 06.12.2010
New possibility of reversing damage caused by MS
New possibility of reversing damage caused by MS
Damage caused by multiple sclerosis could be reversed by activating stem cells that can repair injury in the central nervous system, a study has shown. Researchers from the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have identified a mechanism essential for regenerating insulating layers - known as myelin sheaths - that protect nerve fibres in the brain.

Health - Pedagogy - 06.12.2010
Breaking down barriers in child mental health
Breaking down barriers in child mental health
PA345 /10 Parents face many barriers in seeking help for their child's mental health problems, according to new research led by experts in psychiatry at The University of Nottingham. The study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry found that parents are often deterred from asking for professional help for their child because of embarrassment, stigma and the fear of their child being 'labelled'.

Health - Chemistry - 06.12.2010
Potential role for vitamin B1 in preventing heart problems in people with diabetes
Potential role for vitamin B1 in preventing heart problems in people with diabetes
A dietary supplement of the synthetic derivative of vitamin B1 has the potential to prevent heart disease caused by diabetes, according to new research from the University of Bristol, funded by Diabetes UK. Vitamin B1 may help the body to dispose of toxins and therefore protect cells of the heart from becoming damaged.

Health - 03.12.2010
Venomous lizards could help heart patients
A new study on venomous lizards has revealed the existence of novel venoms that could potentially be used to treat high blood pressure. Dr Bryan Fry of the University of Melbourne led a team of researchers from across the world, including Belgium, the Netherlands, Ireland, Switzerland, Israel and the US, to examine the unexplored group of venomous lizards called anguimorphs - a group that includes monitor, alligator and legless lizards.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.12.2010
Faulty gene linked to disorders of sexual development
Scientists have discovered that the alteration of a single gene could cause some male embryos to develop as females. The breakthrough will improve diagnosis and clinical management of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD). These conditions occur when the testis or ovary does not develop properly in the embryo, causing genital abnormalities in one in 4500 babies.

Health - 03.12.2010
How the stem cell niche never dies
How the stem cell niche never dies
[NEWS 2010-12-03] Stem cells are enclosed by special protective cells in what is known as a stem cell niche in the surrounding tissue. A new paper from Karolinska Institutet, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, now demonstrates how the stem cell niche in the adult mouse brain can be maintained for life - in a way that is completely different from stem cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.12.2010
New brain imaging tests to track Huntingdon s
New brain imaging tests to track Huntingdon s
A range of new clinical, functional, and neuroimaging tests developed by researchers at UCL make it possible to track the progression of Huntington's disease long before noticeable symptoms appear. The new tests provide useful biomarkers that could be used in future trials to detect the effectiveness of potential disease-modifying treatments within a short time period.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.12.2010
Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory
Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory
The research could aid in development of new antibiotics used to fight multidrug resistant superbugs such as MRSA found in many U.S. hospitals.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.12.2010
More fruit and veg unlikely to protect against cancer
More fruit and veg unlikely to protect against cancer
Health 01 Dec 10 There is no convincing evidence that eating more fruit and vegetables can reduce chances of developing cancer, although they are important for maintaining a healthy diet. That's the conclusion of a review by an Oxford University scientist that looked at a decade of evidence on the links between fruit and vegetables and the development of cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2010
U-M researchers identify protein essential for cell division in blood-forming stem cells
U-M researchers identify protein essential for cell division in blood-forming stem cells
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—University of Michigan researchers have discovered that a protein known to regulate cellular metabolism is also necessary for normal cell division in blood-forming stem cells. Loss of the protein results in an abnormal number of chromosomes and a high rate of cell death. The finding demonstrates that stem cells are metabolically different from other blood-forming cells, which can divide without the protein, Lkb1.

Health - Economics / Business - 30.11.2010
Researchers Report Surprising AIDS-Treatment Benefits, Prevention Strategy in Epidemic Regions of Africa
Joshua Graff-Zivin Craig McIntosh SEXUAL BEHAVIOR AIDS treatment December 01, 2010 By Rex Graham Two teams of researchers at UC San Diego and other U.S. and African universities and the World Bank have documented significant spillover benefits of a drug therapy to combat AIDS symptoms and a novel prevention strategy that focuses on girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, an area with two-thirds of the world's HIV infections.