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Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2010
Cholesterol-Lowering Statins Boost Bacteria-Killing Cells
Widely prescribed for their cholesterol-lowering properties, recent clinical research indicates that statins can produce a second, significant health benefit: lowering the risk of severe bacterial infections such as pneumonia and sepsis. A new explanation for these findings has been discovered by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, who describe for the first time how statins activate the bacterial killing properties of white blood cells.

Social Sciences - Health - 12.11.2010
Severe acne increase the risk of suicide attempt
Individuals who suffer from severe acne are at an increased risk of attempting suicide, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet. The study also finds that an additional risk may be present during and up to one year after treatment with isotretinoin, a commonly prescribed drug for severe acne.

Chemistry - Health - 11.11.2010
Scientists demystify enzyme involved in drug and food metabolism
Scientists demystify enzyme involved in drug and food metabolism
For the first time, scientists have been able to "freeze in time" a mysterious process by which a critical enzyme metabolizes drugs and chemicals in food. By recreating this process in the lab, a team of researchers has solved a 40-year-old puzzle about changes in a family of enzymes produced by the liver that break down common drugs such as Tylenol, caffeine and opiates, as well as nutrients in many foods.

Health - Linguistics / Literature - 11.11.2010
Real cause of Brecht's demise revealed
Real cause of Brecht’s demise revealed
A dogged piece of detective work by a University professor has uncovered the truth about how one of the world's greatest playwrights died 54 years ago. Rumours have long surrounded the official version of Bertolt Brecht's death from a heart attack in 1956 in Communist East Berlin. But Professor Stephen Parker, from The University of Manchester, has now proved that the iconic German poet, playwright and theatre director suffered as a child in the early 1900s from undiagnosed rheumatic fever, then a poorly understood condition.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.11.2010
X-rays illuminate the mechanism used by HIV to attack human DNA
X-rays illuminate the mechanism used by HIV to attack human DNA
X-rays illuminate the mechanism used by HIV to attack human DNA Imperial scientists have made an important advance in understanding how retroviruses infect human cells. Thursday 12 November 2010 Adapted from a news release issued by Diamond Light Source. Scientists from Imperial College London have used data collected at Diamond Light Source , the UK's national synchrotron facility, to advance the understanding of how HIV and other retroviruses infect human or animal cells.

Health - 11.11.2010
Tetris flashback reduction effect not common to all games?
Tetris flashback reduction effect not common to all games?
Science | Health 11 Nov 10 The computer game Tetris may have a special ability to reduce flashbacks after viewing traumatic images not shared by other types of computer game, Oxford University scientists have discovered in a series of experiments. In earlier laboratory work the Oxford team showed that playing Tetris after traumatic events could reduce memory flashbacks in healthy volunteers.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2010
Contact among age groups key to understanding whooping cough spread and control
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Strategies for preventing the spread of whooping cough—on the rise in the United States and several other countries in recent years—should take into account how often people in different age groups interact, research at the University of Michigan suggests. The findings appear in the Nov.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2010
Scientists Identify One Cause Of Damage In Alzheimer’s Disease And Find A Way To Stop It
Coating with a drug candidate (blue) inhibits interaction between amyloid beta and other proteins, like the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Illustration by Christopher Burke. Researchers suspect that a protein superstructure called amyloid beta is responsible for much of the neural damage of Alzheimer's disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2010
Scientists Describe the Delicate Balance in the Brain that Controls Fear
PASADENA, Calif.—The eerie music in the movie theater swells; the roller coaster crests and begins its descent; something goes bump in the night. Suddenly, you're scared: your heart thumps, your stomach clenches, your throat tightens, your muscles freeze you in place. But fear doesn't come from your heart, your stomach, your throat, or your muscles.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2010
Tuning in to a new hearing mechanism
More than 30 million Americans suffer from hearing loss, and about 6 million wear hearing aids. While those devices can boost the intensity of sounds coming into the ear, they are often ineffective in loud environments such as restaurants, where you need to pick out the voice of your dining companion from background noise.

Health - 09.11.2010
Alzheimers clues found in middle-aged adults
Alzheimers clues found in middle-aged adults
The neurological decline that leads to Alzheimers disease may begin in middle-age and can be predicted with a simple-to-administer test, according to new research from The Australian National University. The study, led by Professor David Bunce of the Centre for Mental Health Research at ANU and Brunel University, London, has revealed that some apparently healthy adults living in the community aged between 44 and 48 years have minute white-matter lesions in areas of their brains similar to those found in people with Alzheimers disease later in life.

Health - 09.11.2010
More intensive cholesterol treatment reduces heart risk further
More intensive cholesterol treatment reduces heart risk further
Health 09 Nov 10 More intensive treatment using statin drugs to lower levels of bad cholesterol leads to even greater reductions in the risk of a heart attack or stroke than with regular statin doses. That's the conclusion of two Oxford University-led studies published in the medical journal The Lancet today.

Pedagogy - Health - 09.11.2010
Psychoprophylaxis helps tocophobic men
Psychoprophylaxis helps tocophobic men
New research presented in a doctoral thesis from Karolinska Institutet shows that psychoprophylaxis can help men with tocophobia (fear of childbirth). The thesis, which is to be presented on 12 November, also shows that although psychoprophylaxis generally has no effect on the experience of childbirth for women or men, its actual use during delivery seems to reduce the risk of emergency C-section.

Health - 08.11.2010
Family behaviour helps schizophrenics avoid relapse
Family behaviour helps schizophrenics avoid relapse Working to change the behaviour of family members may be an effective treatment for people with schizophrenia, according to a new study co-authored by a researcher at the University of Sheffield. The research team, which included John Rathbone from the University´s School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) reviewed the most up-to-date evidence on the subject and found that patients whose families received psychosocial interventions were less likely to relapse.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2010
Scientists make advance in dementia research
Scientists make advance in dementia research
The preservation of a protein found in particular synapses in the brain plays a key role in protecting against vascular dementia after a stroke, say researchers at King's College London. The study, funded by the Dunhill Medical Trust, is published in the 9 November issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Health - 08.11.2010
New drug effective worldwide against severe malaria
New drug effective worldwide against severe malaria
Health 08 Nov 10 The largest ever clinical trial in patients hospitalised with severe malaria has concluded that the drug artesunate should now be the preferred treatment for the disease in both children and adults everywhere in the world. The study, led by Professor Nick White of Oxford University, compared treatment with artesunate, which is used in Asia to treat severe malaria, against quinine, which has been in use worldwide for over 300 years.

Health - Chemistry - 08.11.2010
MIT IDs new cancer drug target
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Suppressing cancer cells? ability to replicate damaged DNA could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs such as cisplatin, according to a new pair of papers from MIT biologists. In studies of mice, the researchers found that slowing down a specific system for tolerating DNA damage not only prolonged survival but also prevented relapsed tumors from becoming resistant to chemotherapy, and made tumors much less likely to spread to other parts of the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2010
Fat cells reach their limit and trigger changes linked to type 2 diabetes
Fat cells reach their limit and trigger changes linked to type 2 diabetes
Scientists have found that the fat cells and tissues of morbidly obese people and animals can reach a limit in their ability to store fat appropriately. Beyond this limit several biological processes conspire to prevent further expansion of fat tissue and in the process may trigger other health problems.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2010
Funding the best translational research
Funding the best translational research
Sir Mark Walport, Director of the Wellcome Trust, spoke at this month's Biomedical Forum at King's, where he discussed the vision and strategy of the Wellcome Trust in supporting translational research. Sir Mark highlighted the importance of researchers being able to demonstrate that tax payers' money is funding research that is attempting to answer important questions.

Health - Pedagogy - 08.11.2010
Vapor rub relieves cold symptoms for children, helps them sleep better
Hershey, Pa - Applying a vapor rub is effective for treating children with night-time cough and congestion and improves sleep for children with cold symptoms, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. "Upper respiratory infections are the most common acute illnesses in the world," said Ian Paul, M.D. M.Sc., associate professor of pediatrics and public health sciences.