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Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2012
Viewpoint: Stem cells could produce unlimited eggs to aid future fertility treatment
Viewpoint: Stem cells could produce unlimited eggs to aid future fertility treatment
Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital have shown that it could be possible for stem cells in adult women to produce new eggs in the laboratory. Experiments showed that these eggs could be fertilised, suggesting that it could be developed for potential new infertility treatment in the future.

Social Sciences - Health - 29.02.2012
Bullies and victims three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts by age 11
Children involved in bullying - as both a victim and a bully - are three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts by the time they reach 11 years old, according to research from the University of Warwick. In a paper published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the researchers found children who are both victims and bullies ('bully-victims'), are at highly increased risk of considering suicide, or have planned and engaged in suicidal or self-harming behaviour by 11-12 years of age.

Health - Psychology - 29.02.2012
Study challenges guidelines on art therapy for people with schizophrenia
Adapted from a news release issued by the British Medical Journal Referring people with schizophrenia to group art therapy does not improve their mental health or social functioning, finds a study published in the British Medical Journal today. The findings challenge national treatment guidelines which recommend that doctors consider referring all people with schizophrenia for arts therapies.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.02.2012
Molecular duo dictate weight and energy levels, Yale researchers find
Molecular duo dictate weight and energy levels, Yale researchers find
Yale University researchers have discovered a key cellular mechanism that may help the brain control how much we eat, what we weigh, and how much energy we have. The findings, published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, describe the regulation of a family of cells that projectthroughout the nervous system and originate in an area of the brain call the hypothalamus, which has been long known to control energy balances.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.02.2012
Parasites may evolve to exploit gender differences in hosts
Parasites may evolve to exploit gender differences in hosts
Researchers have observed that certain disease-causing parasites tend to favor one sex over the other in a host species and have suggested that differences in immune responses or behavior between the sexes is the main reason why. A Cornell postdoctoral researcher proposes that such differences as morphology, physiology, behavior, diet and life history traits between the sexes in the host species can, in fact, pose very different challenges and opportunities to their parasites, causing them to adapt to one host sex.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.02.2012
Is Shark Fin Soup a Threat to Brain Health?
Is Shark Fin Soup a Threat to Brain Health?
— Coral Gables — Sharks, which are among the most threatened of marine species, are killed primarily for their fins alone to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, an Asian delicacy. Now, a new study by University of Miami scientists in the journal  Marine Drugs  has found that shark fins contain high concentrations of BMAA, a neurotoxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases in humans including Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS).

Life Sciences - Health - 28.02.2012
New discoveries on depression
During depression, the brain becomes less plastic and adaptable, and thus less able to perform certain tasks, like storing memories. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now traced the brain's lower plasticity to reduced functionality in its support cells, and believe that learning more about these cells can pave the way for radical new therapies for depression.

Health - 27.02.2012
Cancer Research Centre pushes Sheffield to the forefront of new discoveries
Cancer Research Centre pushes Sheffield to the forefront of new discoveries
Cancer Research Centre pushes Sheffield to the forefront of new discoveries World class research and medical expertise is pushing the Sheffield Cancer Research Centre to the forefront of new discoveries helping more people beat cancer. An evening of celebration will take place tomorrow (Wednesday 29 February 2012) to showcase how research into the devastating disease is making a major leap forward following the formation of the Centre last October.

Health - 27.02.2012
How accurate are rapid flu tests?
New research could lead to more timely diagnosis and aid clinical management during flu season A new study conducted by researchers from McGill University, the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC), and Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, has put the accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) under the microscope.

Health - Chemistry - 27.02.2012
Modified bone drug kills malaria parasite in mice
Modified bone drug kills malaria parasite in mice
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A chemically altered osteoporosis drug may be useful in fighting malaria, researchers report in a new study. Unlike similar compounds tested against many other parasitic protozoa, the drug readily crosses into the red blood cells of malaria-infected mice and kills the malaria parasite.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.02.2012
Hyperactivity in brain may explain multiple symptoms of depression
Hyperactivity in brain may explain multiple symptoms of depression
Most of us know what it means when it's said that someone is depressed. But commonly, true clinical depression brings with it a number of other symptoms. These can include anxiety, poor attention and concentration, memory issues, and sleep disturbances. Traditionally, depression researchers have sought to identify the individual brain areas responsible for causing these symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.02.2012
Brain food: Study provides further confirmation that eating fish is good for you
Brain food: Study provides further confirmation that eating fish is good for you
A new study by UCLA researchers shows that a diet lacking in omega-3 fatty acids, which are commonly found in fish, may cause your brain to age faster and lose some of its memory and thinking capabilities. The research demonstrated that people with lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids have lower brain volumes — equivalent to approximately two years of structural brain aging.

Health - 24.02.2012
Study examines number of GP visits before cancer patients are referred to specialists
Study examines number of GP visits before cancer patients are referred to specialists
Patient information reveals women, young people, ethnic minorities and people with less common cancers have the highest number of pre-referral consultations. " More than three quarters (77%) of cancer patients who first present to their family doctors (GPs) with suspicious symptoms are referred to hospital after only one or two consultations, a new study has found.

Health - 24.02.2012
Increasing nurse-to-patient ratios do not extend patient safety
Increasing nurse-to-patient ratios do not extend patient safety
Hospitals are currently under pressure to control the cost of medical care, while at the same time improving patient health and reducing medical errors through appropriate nurse staffing levels. A study into the effects of a law requiring increased nurse-to-patient ratios on patient mortality finds that mandating such changes do not reduce adverse patient outcomes.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.02.2012
New insights into understanding brain performance
People who take Ritalin are far more aware of their mistakes, a University of Melbourne study has found. The study, by Rob Hester from the Department of Psychological Sciences and colleagues at the Queensland Brain Institute, investigated how the brain monitors ongoing behaviour for performance errors - specifically failures of impulse control.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.02.2012
Slamming the brakes on the malaria life-cycle
PA59/12 Scientists have discovered a new target in their fight against the devastating global disease 'malaria' thanks to the discovery of a new protein involved in the parasite's life cycle. The research has uncovered a vital player in the sexual phase of the malaria parasite's reproduction which could prove an effective target for new treatments to stop the disease in its tracks.

Health - 23.02.2012
Vaccinating adults with new pneumonia vaccine more cost-effective, affirms Yale researcher
A new study suggests vaccinating adults against one of the most common causes of pneumonia with a new vaccine, which has virtually eliminated this infection in children, is more cost effective than using the current vaccine. Yale researcher Eugene Shapiro agrees with the study's findings in an editorial published in the current issue of JAMA.

Health - Psychology - 23.02.2012
Training parents is good medicine for children with autism behavior problems
Children with autism spectrum disorders who also have serious behavioral problems responded better to medication combined with training for their parents than to treatment with medication alone, Yale researchers and their colleagues report in the February issue of Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.02.2012
"Popeye" proteins help the heart adapt to stress
Image: Blue staining shows the localisation of Popdc proteins in the heart. The arrows point to high levels of the protein in the cardiac pacemaker centres of the heart. A family of proteins named after Popeye play an essential role in allowing the heart to respond to stress, according to a study published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation .

Pedagogy - Health - 23.02.2012
Higher risk of autism among certain immigrant groups
Higher risk of autism among certain immigrant groups
A major register study from Karolinska Institutet shows that children born to certain groups of immigrants had an increased risk of developing autism with intellectual disability. The study includes all children in Stockholm County from 2001 to 2007, and brings the question of the heredity of autism to the fore.