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Health - 08.11.2010
Scientists discover how songbird brains control singing tempo
Scientists discover how songbird brains control singing tempo
A team of scientists has observed the activity of nerve cells in a songbird's brain as it is singing a particular song. Dezhe Jin , an assistant professor in the Department of Physics at Penn State and one of the study's authors, explained that understanding how birds string together sets of syllables - or notes in a song - may provide some insight into how the human brain learns language and produces speech.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.11.2010
Low blood levels of vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. Vitamin D, which is primarily provided to the body by the sun, has been a hot topic in the U.S. lately.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.11.2010
New link between growth factors and early prostate cancer found
New link between growth factors and early prostate cancer found
A new study by researchers from the University of Bristol, presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) conference today, has found potential new biomarkers for very early prostate cancer in men with no symptoms of the disease. The researchers, from the University's School of Social and Community Medicine , investigated levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) in men whose cancer had been detected through PSA screening.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.11.2010
To prevent inbreeding, flowering plants have evolved multiple genes
To prevent inbreeding, flowering plants have evolved multiple genes
A research team led by Teh-hui Kao , professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State, in collaboration with a team lead by Professor Seiji Takayama at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, has discovered a large suite of genes in the petunia plant that acts to prevent it from breeding with itself or with its close relatives, and to promote breeding with unrelated individuals.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.11.2010
Breakthrough in cancer vaccine research
Breakthrough in cancer vaccine research
Researchers at the University of Cambridge hope to revolutionise cancer therapy after discovering one of the reasons why many previous attempts to harness the immune system to treat cancerous tumours have failed. New research, published today , reveals that a type of stromal cell found in many cancers which expresses fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP), plays a major role in suppressing the immune response in cancerous tumours - thereby restricting the use of vaccines and other therapies which rely on the body's immune system to work.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.11.2010
Five-year results show keyhole bowel cancer surgery is safe and effective
Five-year results show keyhole bowel cancer surgery is safe and effective
Patients who have laparoscopic or 'keyhole' surgery spend less time in hospital and recover more quickly from the operation. Now long-term follow-up data has confirmed that this way of doing surgery does not make patients with colorectal cancer more vulnerable to the disease returning, as some had feared.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.11.2010
Probing Question: Why is it so hard to lose weight?
Probing Question: Why is it so hard to lose weight?
By Grace Warren Research/Penn State If you're an adult American, chances are pretty good that at one time or another you've tried to diet. Chances also are good that, despite your efforts, you've found yourself standing on a scale and looking at a certain number with frustration and disbelief. It's the same number as last week, and the week before, even though you've been cutting back on sweets and going to the gym an extra day.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.11.2010
Ford and MIT research study shows technological advancements reduce stress on driver
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Ford Motor Company and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) New England University Transportation Center (NEUTC) today revealed results from a nine-month advanced research project that shows drivers are less stressed when using selected new technological advancements in the car.

Health - 03.11.2010
Fossil finger records key to ancestors' behaviour
Fossil finger records key to ancestors’ behaviour
Liverpool, UK - 3 November 2010: Fossil finger bones of early human ancestors suggest that Neanderthals were more promiscuous than human populations today, researchers at the universities of Liverpool and Oxford have found.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2010
Map supports sickle cell link
Map supports sickle cell link
Science | Health 03 Nov 10 At a global scale, the sickle cell gene is most commonly found in areas with historically high levels of malaria, adding geographical support to the hypothesis that the gene, whilst potentially deadly, avoids disappearing through natural selection by providing protection against malaria.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2010
Macrophage Protein Has Major Role in Inflammation
By Scott Lafee Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a multi-tasking protein called FoxO1 has another important but previously unknown function: It directly interacts with macrophages, promoting an inflammatory response that can lead to insulin resistance and diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2010
Taking the fear factor out of cancer
Taking the fear factor out of cancer
PA 297/10 It is the second most deadly disease in the Western world and one of the most feared diagnoses a patient can face. Now, a new book penned by a Nottingham academic is aiming to improve our understanding of cancer so we can better deal with its often devastating consequences. Cancer: A Beginner's Guide is the first book of its kind covering all of the issues related to the disease in a clear and straightforward way, rather than concentrating on just one particular scientific aspect.

Health - 02.11.2010
Study of babies' brain scans sheds new light on the brain's unconscious activity and how it develops
Study of babies’ brain scans sheds new light on the brain’s unconscious activity and how it develops
Full-term babies are born with a key collection of networks already formed in their brains, according to new research that challenges some previous theories about the brain's activity and how the brain develops. Researchers led by a team from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London used functional MRI scanning to look at 'resting state' networks in the brains of 70 babies, born at between 29 and 43 weeks of development, who were receiving treatment at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

Health - Psychology - 02.11.2010
Gastric bypass alters sweet taste function
Hershey, Pa. Gastric bypass surgery decreases the preference for sweet-tasting substances in obese rats, a study finding that could help in developing safer treatments for the morbidly obese, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. "Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is the most common effective treatment for morbid obesity," said Andras Hajnal, M.D. Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Neural and Behavioral Science and Surgery.

Health - 02.11.2010
Arthritis drugs could help prevent memory loss after surgery, study suggests
Arthritis drugs could help prevent memory loss after surgery, study suggests
Arthritis drugs could help prevent memory loss after surgery, study suggests Anti-inflammatory drugs currently used to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis may also help prevent cognitive problems after surgery, according to a new study. Imperial College London Press Release Monday 1 November 2010 Anti-inflammatory drugs currently used to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis may also help prevent cognitive problems after surgery, according to a new study by researchers at Imperial College London and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Health - 02.11.2010
Study provides treatment hope for long term effects of brain trauma
Brain damage continues to develop and evolve for months after a traumatic brain injury (TBI), revealing a potential target for treatments to improve brain trauma, new research led by the University of Melbourne has found. Around 400,000 Australians have a disability related to traumatic brain injury with cognitive, psychiatric and epileptic problems the most common symptoms.

Health - 02.11.2010
Lactate in the brain reveals aging process
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have shown that they may be able to monitor the aging process in the brain, by using MRI technique to measure the brain lactic acid levels. Their findings suggest that the lactate levels increase in advance of other aging symptoms, and therefore could be used as an indicator of aging and age-related diseases of the CNS.

Health - 01.11.2010
Study of babies' brain scans sheds new light on the brain's unconscious activity and how it develops
Study of babies’ brain scans sheds new light on the brain’s unconscious activity and how it develops
Study of babies' brain scans sheds new light on the brain's unconscious activity and how it develops Researchers find that full-term babies are born with a key collection of networks already formed in their brains Full-term babies are born with a key collection of networks already formed in their brains, according to new research that challenges some previous theories about the brain's activity and how the brain develops.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2010
Breakthrough: Scientists harness the power of electricity in the brain
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A paralyzed patient may someday be able to "think" a foot into flexing or a leg into moving, using technology that harnesses the power of electricity in the brain, and scientists at University of Michigan School of Kinesiology are now one big step closer. Researchers at the school and colleagues from the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego have developed technology that for the first time allows doctors and scientists to noninvasively isolate and measure electrical brain activity in moving people.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.10.2010
Wild Scottish sheep could help explain differences in immunity
Wild Scottish sheep could help explain differences in immunity
Strong immunity may play a key role in determining long life, but may do so at the expense of reduced fertility, a Princeton University study has concluded. An 11-year study of a population of wild sheep located on a remote island off the coast of Scotland that gauged the animals' susceptibility to infection may give new insight into why some people get sicker than others when exposed to the same illness.