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Health - Life Sciences - 16.02.2012
Down’s syndrome stem cells used to model Alzheimer’s
Down’s syndrome stem cells used to model Alzheimer’s
One of the biggest challenges facing dementia researchers at the moment is a lack of good ways to track the disease over time.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.02.2012
Owning a dog encourages exercise in pregnant women
  Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that women who own dogs are more physically active during pregnancy than those who don't. The study of more than 11,000 pregnant women, in partnership with Mars Petcare, showed that those who owned dogs were approximately 50% more likely to achieve the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day through high levels of brisk walking than those without dogs.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.02.2012
Owning a dog encourages exercise in pregnant women
Owning a dog encourages exercise in pregnant women
A study of more than 11,000 pregnant women in Children of the 90s at the University of Bristol shows that those who owned dogs were approximately 50 per cent more likely than those who didn't to achieve the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day through high levels of brisk walking. Scientists suggest that, as walking is a low-risk exercise, walking a dog could form part of a broader strategy to improve the health of pregnant women.

Health - Administration - 15.02.2012
Tool assessing how community health centers deliver ’medical home’ care may be flawed
On the health front, the poor often have at least two things going against them: a lack of insurance and chronic illnesses, of which diabetes is among the most common. The federal Affordable Care Act would expand the capacity of the nation's 8,000 community health centers to provide care for low-income, largely minority patients — from the current 20 million to about 40 million by 2015.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 15.02.2012
Parent-training intervention curbs pediatric obesity rates, study shows
Researchers found that after one year, there was a 9 percent reduction in overweight and obese children in the parent-training intervention group, while a control group that did not receive the parent training had a 16 percent increase in overweight and obese children.

Health - Physics - 15.02.2012
New method makes it easier to treat prostate and pancreatic cancer
Laser light in combination with certain drugs – known as photodynamic therapy – can destroy cancer tumours, but is today used mostly to cure skin cancer. The reason that internal tumours are not treated with the method is that the technology does not exist to check that the precise amount of light is administered.

Health - Physics - 15.02.2012
Prolonged fructose intake not linked to rise in blood pressure: study
Eating fruit sugar over an extended period of time does not lead to an increase in blood pressure, according to researchers at the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital. A new study has found that despite previous research showing blood pressure rose in humans immediately after they consumed fruit sugar - also known as fructose - there is no evidence fructose increases blood pressure when it has been eaten for more than seven days.

Health - History / Archeology - 15.02.2012
Complexities in caregiving at the end of life
Complexities in caregiving at the end of life
Faced with the inevitability of death, we all wish for good caregiving during the final stage of our lives. A new study from Karolinska Institutet and Umeĺ University shows that non-pharmacological caregiving at the end of life in specialized palliative care is not as basic as one might believe but is based on complex professional decisions that weave physical, psychosocial and existential dimensions into a functional whole.

Health - Administration - 15.02.2012
Radiation generates cancer stem cells from less aggressive breast cancer cells
Radiation generates cancer stem cells from less aggressive breast cancer cells
Breast cancer stem cells, thought to be the sole source of tumor recurrence, are known to be resistant to radiation therapy and don't respond well to chemotherapy. Now, researchers with the UCLA Department of Radiation Oncology at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report for the first time that radiation treatment, despite killing half of all tumor cells during every treatment, transforms other cancer cells into treatment-resistant breast cancer stem cells.

Health - History / Archeology - 14.02.2012
End of life care is complex but aims to provide care and comfort
A new study from Karolinska Institute and Umeĺ University finds that non-pharmacological care in the last days of a patient's life, known as palliative care, is not as simplistic as one may think. Palliative care is multifaceted and complex, with physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential care interwoven in caregiving activities.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.02.2012
Critical stage of embryonic development now observable
Critical stage of embryonic development now observable
Not only is this approach uncovering events previously hidden from view, but it has other important potential applications. This is the period of development during which the natural population of stem cells undergoes expansion to form the foundation upon which the body can be built." —Professor Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, lead author of the research A novel approach in   The research, from the laboratory of Professor Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz of the University of Cambridge, enables scientists to view critical aspects of embryonic development which was previously unobservable.

Health - Administration - 14.02.2012
Patients’ online hospital reviews reflect data on hospital outcomes
Imperial College London Media Release Patients' ratings of hospitals tally with objective measures of the hospital's performance, according to an independent study published today in Archives of Internal Medicine . Since 2008, patients have been able to post comments on and rate hospitals using the NHS Choices website, in the same way as they might rate a hotel on Tripadvisor.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.02.2012
New Analysis Provides Clearer Picture of Cancer Risks Associated with Lynch syndrome
An international study led by the University of Melbourne has provided a clearer understanding of the cancer risks associated with the genetic mutation Lynch syndrome, a finding that could lead to earlier detection of a wide range of cancers in sufferers. People with Lynch syndrome have a genetic mutation that gives them a high risk of several types of cancer including bowel cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.02.2012
Malaria parasite goes bananas before sex: new study
New research from the University of Melbourne shows how the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum) changes into a banana shape before sexual reproduction, a finding that could provide targets for vaccine or drug development and may explain how the parasite evades the human immune system. The work was conducted by an Australian research team led by Matthew Dixon and PhD student Megan Dearnley from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne, and is published in the Journal of Cell Science today.

Health - Civil Engineering - 14.02.2012
Searching for solutions
Searching for solutions
Collaborative research is helping to shed light on how to close the gap on Indigenous health disadvantage, writes SIMON COPLAND. We hear a lot about 'closing the gap' between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcomes. With a 12-year difference in life expectancy between non-Indigenous and Indigenous males, and child mortality rates up to four times higher in Indigenous communities, Indigenous disadvantage is considered to be one of Australia's biggest health problems.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.02.2012
Sri Lanka diabetes warning
Sri Lanka diabetes warning
Scientists at King's College London and the National Diabetes Centre (Sri Lanka) have found evidence of a high number of risk factors for type 2 diabetes among the young urban population in Sri Lanka. The study is the first large-scale investigation into diabetes risk among children and young people in South Asia, and provides further evidence that the region is rapidly becoming a hotspot in the growing international diabetes epidemic.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2012
Neuron memory key to taming chronic pain
Study suggests erasing neuronal memories may help control persistent pain For some, the pain is so great that they can't even bear to have clothes touch their skin. For others, it means that every step is a deliberate and agonizing choice. Whether the pain is caused by arthritic joints, an injury to a nerve or a disease like fibromyalgia, research now suggests there are new solutions for those who suffer from chronic pain.

Health - 12.02.2012
New cases of rare genetic disorder identified
New cases of rare genetic disorder identified
Scientists at the University of Liverpool, working with international partners, have shown a rare genetic disease, that causes crippling osteoarthritis in the spine and major joints, is far more prevalent worldwide than previously thought. Researchers have identified more than 100 new cases of the disease, called alkaptonuria (AKU) in a small community in Vellore, India, bringing the total number of patients there to 130.

Health - 10.02.2012
Preventing malaria early in pregnancy is crucial
Preventing malaria early in pregnancy is crucial
Source: Wellcome Trust The importance of preventing malaria in pregnancy is demonstrated by research which has provided the most accurate and direct evidence to date that malaria infection reduces early growth of the developing baby. The study of almost 3,800 pregnancies was carried out on the border of Thailand and Myanmar (Burma) as part of the Wellcome Trust-Mahidol University-Oxford University programme in tropical medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.02.2012
Cell find aids quest for cancer drugs
Fresh insights into how our cells multiply could help scientists develop drugs to treat cancer. Researchers at the University have led a study that enables better understanding of the workings of two key proteins that control cell division. This process must be carried out accurately to keep cells healthy, and when it goes out of control, it can lead to cancer.