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Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2011
Scientists find key protein that suppresses prostate cancer growth in the laboratory
Scientists find key protein that suppresses prostate cancer growth in the laboratory
Scientists find key protein that suppresses prostate cancer growth in the laboratory Research on proteins leads towards potential new prostate cancer treatments Cancer researchers have discovered an important protein, produced naturally inside cells, that appears to suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells in the laboratory.

Environment - Health - 31.01.2011
Chronic stress appears to be linked to low-income achievement gap, reports expert
Chronic stress appears to be linked to low-income achievement gap, reports expert
Children in low-income families lag behind their higher-income counterparts on virtually all measures of achievement, and this gap tends to increase over time. There are many reasons why, but a Cornell environmental psychologist and his colleagues add a new culprit to the list: chronic stress from adverse neighborhood and family conditions.

Health - 31.01.2011
Artificial pancreas in pregnancy promises fewer diabetes deaths
Artificial pancreas in pregnancy promises fewer diabetes deaths
Cambridge research funded by the health charity Diabetes UK has for the first time successfully demonstrated the potential of an artificial pancreas in pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes. It is hoped the development could drastically reduce cases of stillbirth and mortality rates among pregnant women with the condition.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2011
Disruptions in calcium flow linked to heart failure
Disruptions in calcium flow linked to heart failure
Excessive release of calcium inside cardiac muscle can cause sudden cardiac death in heart failure patients. New research has revealed how this could happen, opening up new possibilities for combating heart disease. Calcium plays a vital role in regulating cardiac muscle contraction. With each heartbeat, calcium is released from intracellular stores known as the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), through specialised channels called ryanodine receptors (RyR2).

Health - 28.01.2011
Statin benefit not affected by low inflammation
Statin benefit not affected by low inflammation
Health 28 Jan 11 A new study shows that statins are at least as effective in reducing the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with low levels of inflammation as they are in other patients. It has been suggested that a person's level of systemic inflammation, as measured by levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood, could modify their response to statin therapy.

Health - Veterinary - 28.01.2011
Cows done in by bad spuds
Anyone taking the recent, mysterious deaths of 200 steers in a Portage County, Wis., feedlot as a sign of the apocalypse can rest easy. The cows, according to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory , were done in by bad spuds. Specifically, the cows were poisoned by a toxin found in moldy sweet potatoes, which apparently were mixed in with potato waste fed to the animals.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.01.2011
Montreal researchers solve decades-old medical mysteries using genetics
The mystery began in 1976. Adolfo Pampena was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer that caused a strange combination of symptoms and was associated with the occurrence of multiple tumours in his stomach and colon. His medical team was stumped and was unable to answer the most important questions for him and his family: the cause of his disease and the risk for future generations.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.01.2011
Scientists pinpoint ancient body clock
An internal 24-hour clock that affects all forms of life has been identified by University scientists. The research provides important insight into health-related problems linked to individuals with disrupted clocks - such as pilots and shift workers. The findings also indicate that the 24-hour circadian clock found in human cells dates back millions of years to early life on Earth.

Health - Environment - 27.01.2011
Probing Question: Are cell phones safe?
By Dean Haycock Research/Penn State An estimated 5 billion people around the world hold cell phones up to their ears nearly every day. Many of them wonder if they might be receiving more than news from people on the other end. Are mobile phones dosing us with carcinogenic radiation? "To date, two dozen studies on brain and other types of cancer have been published.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.01.2011
Brain versus brawn: a genetic discovery
Brain versus brawn: a genetic discovery
Scientists have discovered a gene that defies conventional rules, with the copies inherited from the mother and father working in two very different ways. All animals have two copies of each gene: one inherited from each parent. For most genes, both copies are active, but for some genes, one copy is switched off, a process called imprinting.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2011
Ancient body clock discovered that helps to keep all living things on time
Ancient body clock discovered that helps to keep all living things on time
The mechanism that controls the internal 24-hour clock of all forms of life from human cells to algae has been identified by scientists. Not only does the research provide important insight into health-related problems linked to individuals with disrupted clocks - such as pilots and shift workers - it also indicates that the 24-hour circadian clock found in human cells is the same as that found in algae and dates back millions of years to early life on Earth.

Health - Psychology - 26.01.2011
Positive outlook on life eases chronic pain
A person's outlook on life can minimize - or aggravate - a person's chronic pain, reports a new Cornell study.

Health - 26.01.2011
Pay for performance targets do not improve patient health
PA 25/11 Pay for performance targets set for GPs in the UK are failing to improve the health of patients with high blood pressure. The new study, which presents the strongest evidence yet that pay for performance does not offer any benefit, was carried out by Dr Brian Serumaga, a Harvard Medical School fellow in Pharmaceutical Policy Research in the Division of Primary Care and School of Pharmacy at The University of Nottingham.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.01.2011
Rising indoor winter temperatures linked to obesity?
Rising indoor winter temperatures linked to obesity?
Press release Links: UCL Epidemiology & Public Health UCL Bartlett School of Graduate Studies Increases in winter indoor temperatures in the United Kingdom, United States and other developed countries may be contributing to rises in obesity in those populations, according to UCL research published today.

Health - Environment - 25.01.2011
Self-control predicts health and wealth
Children as young as three with low levels of self-control are more likely to have physical health problems, financial difficulties and a criminal record in later life regardless of background and IQ, according to a new King's College London study funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC). A team of scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's, Duke University in the USA and the University of Otago in New Zealand used data from two large studies to investigate how self-control skills might influence children's chances in life.

Health - Chemistry - 21.01.2011
Cell binding discovery brings hope to those with skin and heart problems
A University of Manchester scientist has revealed the mechanism that binds skin cells tightly together, which he believes will lead to new treatments for painful and debilitating skin diseases and also lethal heart defects. Professor David Garrod, in the Faculty of Life Sciences, has found that the glue molecules bind only to similar glue molecules on other cells, making a very tough, resilient structure.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2011
Stopping the spread of malaria
Stopping the spread of malaria
PA 254/10 Research led by The University of Nottingham has opened up a new area of malaria parasite biology which could lead to new methods of controlling the transmission of this deadly disease. Malaria threatens 40 per cent of the world's human population. It causes disease in 300 million people and kills up to a million children every year.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2011
Contagious cancer thrives in dogs by adopting host's genes
Contagious cancer thrives in dogs by adopting host’s genes
A curious contagious cancer, found in dogs, wolves and coyotes, can repair its own genetic mutations by adopting genes from its host animal, according to a new study in the journal Science . Scientists at Imperial College London have uncovered an unusual process that helps the cancer survive by stealing tiny DNA-containing 'powerhouses' (known as mitochondria) from the cells of the infected animal, to incorporate as its own.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2011
Contagious cancer thrives in dogs by adopting host's genes
Contagious cancer thrives in dogs by adopting host’s genes
Contagious cancer thrives in dogs by adopting host's genes Imperial scientists have found that an unusual contagious cancer adopts genes from its dog host to help it survive Thursday 20 January 2011 A curious contagious cancer, found in dogs, wolves and coyotes, can repair its own genetic mutations by adopting genes from its host animal, according to a new study in the journal Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2011
Scientists discover cancer-fighting role for cells
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. MIT scientists have discovered that cells lining the blood vessels secrete molecules that suppress tumor growth and keep cancer cells from invading other tissues, a finding that could lead to a new way to treat cancer. Elazer Edelman, professor in the MIT-Harvard Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST), says that implanting such cells adjacent to a patient's tumor could shrink a tumor or prevent it from growing back or spreading further after surgery or chemotherapy.