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Health - 15.09.2010
Children's brain development is linked to physical fitness
Children’s brain development is linked to physical fitness
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers have found an association between physical fitness and the brain in 9- and 10-year-old children: Those who are more fit tend to have a bigger hippocampus and perform better on a test of memory than their less-fit peers. The new study, which used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the relative size of specific structures in the brains of 49 child subjects, appears in the journal Brain Research.

Health - Earth Sciences - 15.09.2010
NASA Data Track Seasonal Pollution Changes Over India
NASA Data Track Seasonal Pollution Changes Over India
Data from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft have been used in a groundbreaking new university study that examines the concentration, distribution and composition of aerosol pollution over the Indian subcontinent. The study documents the region's very high levels of natural and human-produced pollutants, and uncovered surprising seasonal shifts in the source of the pollution.

Health - 14.09.2010
Waist size linked to bowel cancer risk
Waist size linked to bowel cancer risk
The review, carried out on behalf of World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) by researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Leeds, has updated the findings of WCRF's landmark 2007 report, which found convincing evidence that being overweight increases bowel cancer risk. But research published since then has increasingly shown abdominal fatness - fat around the waist - is particularly harmful for bowel cancer.

Health - Economics / Business - 14.09.2010
Health reform alone may not increase access to physicians or reduce healthcare inequality gaps
Health reform alone may not increase access to physicians or reduce healthcare inequality gaps
Study finds Massachusetts' reforms did not improve access to personal doctors or cut healthcare inequalities between ethnic or income groups In a new study, Harvard researchers looked at the effects of the 2006 Massachusetts Health Reform and found that the legislation has led to improvements in insurance coverage as well as a decline in financial barriers to care but has not increased people's access to a personal physician or improve their self-rated health.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.09.2010
New Pathway Identified in Parkinson's Through Brain Imaging
Department of Communications: Main phone: 212-305-3900 cumcnews [a] columbia (p) edu Elizabeth Streich P: 212-305-6535 eas2125 [a] columbia (p) edu Alex Lyda P: 212-305-0820 mal2133 [a] columbia (p) edu Karin Eskenazi P: 212-342-0508 ket2116 [a] columbia (p) edu Media Contact: Karin Eskenazi, 212-342-0508, ket2116 [a] columbia (p) edu A new study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center has identified a novel molecular pathway underlying Parkinson's disease and points to existing drugs which may be able to slow progression of the disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.09.2010
Rebuilding immunoreceptors reveals their mode of activation
BIOSS scientists discover the mechanism of how our immune system can be activated for the production of antibodies against thousands of different structures, publication in Nature Freiburg, 10. Just 110 years ago in 1900, Paul Ehrlich, one of the founding fathers of modern immunology, gave the Croonian Lecture to the Royal Society in London "On Immunity with Special Reference to Cell Life".

Health - Life Sciences - 10.09.2010
Wildflower 'armours' itself against disease
Wildflower 'armours' itself against disease
Science 10 Sep 10 An unusual wildflower that accumulates metals in its leaves has been found to use them as a kind of 'armour' against bacterial infection. Alpine pennycress ( Thlaspi caerulescens ) is a small plant in the mustard family that grows on metal-rich soils scattered around Britain and Europe, such as the sites of former mine workings.

Health - 10.09.2010
Translating research into results
In medical research there is a growing recognition that discoveries in the laboratory, no matter how exciting, count for little unless they can be translated into real-life health benefits. This new area of study, called translational research, is the starting point for the University of Sydney's latest symposium at the Shanghai Expo on 13 September.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.09.2010
B vitamins: in depth
Health Jonathan Wood | 09 Sep 10 A story on our news pages today explains how a study published in the journal PLoS One found that taking daily high-dose tablets of certain B vitamins reduced the rate of brain shrinkage in people aged over 70 with mild memory problems. All our brains shrink, especially with age.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.09.2010
B vitamins slow brain shrinkage in people with mild memory problems
B vitamins slow brain shrinkage in people with mild memory problems
Health | Science 09 Sep 10 Daily tablets of certain B vitamins can halve the rate of brain shrinkage in elderly people who suffer from mild memory problems, an Oxford University study has shown. The two-year randomised clinical trial is the largest to study the effect of B vitamins on mild cognitive impairment, and one of the first disease-modifying trials in the Alzheimer's field to show positive results in people.

Health - 09.09.2010
Controversial study suggests neck manipulation not worth the risk
Controversial study suggests neck manipulation not worth the risk
A study by the University of Sydney has found the 'thrust and click' methods associated with neck manipulation do not result in better patient recovery than milder treatments. Project lead, Dr Andrew Leaver from the Faculty of Health Sciences said the study compared common rehabilitation therapies for acute neck pain.

Health - 09.09.2010
Experts highlight dangers of drinking while pregnant
University of Sydney researchers are urging pregnant women to think twice before consuming alcohol, with a new study revealing that while almost 93 percent of Australian women agree alcohol can affect the unborn child, 16 percent do not know the effects are permanent. A worldwide body of evidence shows that women who drink heavily while pregnant risk giving birth to children with a number of abnormalities ranging from birth defects, to problems with growth development and learning difficulties.

Health - 08.09.2010
Research could lead to more effective pancreatic cancer treatment
Research could lead to more effective pancreatic cancer treatment
Liverpool, UK - 8 September 2010: An international trial led by medics at the University of Liverpool has shown a commonly used chemotherapy drug is as effective at helping prevent pancreatic cancer returning after surgery as the more expensive standard chemotherapy treatment. The results of the Cancer Research UK- funded study raise hopes that a new trial looking at giving both drugs after surgery could lead to a more effective treatment for pancreatic cancer patients who are eligible for surgery.

Health - 08.09.2010
Experts question claim that Alexander the Great's half-brother is buried at Vergina
Experts question claim that Alexander the Great’s half-brother is buried at Vergina
Claims that a tomb at Vergina, Greece, the ancient burial place of the Macedonian royal family in the fourth century BC, contains the body of King Philip III Arrhidaios, half-brother of Alexander the Great, and not Philip II, Alexander's father, are called into question by researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Manchester and Oxford.

Earth Sciences - Health - 07.09.2010
Satellite data reveal seasonal pollution changes over India
Satellite data reveal seasonal pollution changes over India
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Armed with a decade's worth of satellite data, University of Illinois atmospheric scientists have documented some surprising trends in aerosol pollution concentration, distribution and composition over the Indian subcontinent. In addition to environmental impact, aerosol pollution, or tiny particles suspended in the air, can be detrimental to human health by causing a range of respiratory problems.

Health - Veterinary - 07.09.2010
New lymphoma treatment shows promise in dogs
New lymphoma treatment shows promise in dogs
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Researchers have identified a new target for the treatment of lymphoma and are testing a potential new drug in pet dogs afflicted with the disease. At low doses, the compound, called S-PAC-1, arrested the growth of tumors in three of six dogs tested and induced partial remission in a fourth.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.09.2010
Drugs and alcohol, not mental illness, explains violent crime risk
Drugs and alcohol, not mental illness, explains violent crime risk
Health | Society 07 Sep 10 Bipolar disorder by itself does not increase the risk of committing violent crime, suggests a new study by Oxford University and the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Instead, the over-representation of individuals with bipolar disorder in violent crime statistics is almost entirely attributable to concurrent drug or alcohol abuse.

Sport - Health - 06.09.2010
Drinks lift for sports teams
Consuming energy drinks during team sports could help young people perform better, a study suggests. Sports scientists found that 12-14 year olds can play for longer in team games when they drink an isotonic sports drink before and during games. Researchers at the University measured the performance of 15 adolescents during exercise designed to simulate the physical demands of team games such as football, rugby and hockey.

Health - Chemistry - 06.09.2010
Protecting the lungs against
Protecting the lungs against "collateral damage" from the immune system
Protecting the lungs against "collateral damage" from the immune system A new study has provided fresh insights into how immune responses can cause damage in conditions such as cystic fibrosis. Adapted from a media release issued by the Wellcome Trust Thursday 2 September 2010 A study published online today shows how our bodies try to minimise potential 'collateral damage' caused by our immune system when fighting infection.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.09.2010
Genetic link for ALS risk confirmed
Genetic link for ALS risk confirmed
Genetic link for ALS risk confirmed 06 Sep 2010, PR 187/10 Genetic variations on a specific chromosome appear to play a role in a fatal motor neuron condition known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, research has found. The study by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London was published in the online edition of The Lancet Neurology .