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Health - Veterinary - 29.06.2011
Honey helps heal horses' wounds, researchers find
Honey helps heal horses’ wounds, researchers find
A simple application of honey to horses' leg wounds results in smaller wound sizes and faster healing time, University of Sydney researchers have found. Honey has been used to treat wounds in humans since ancient Egypt, but this study, using manuka honey from New Zealand, is the first time in the world a clinical trial has been conducted in horses.

Health - 28.06.2011
Researchers discover new airway stem cell
Researchers at UCLA have identified a new stem cell that participates in the repair of the lungs' large airways, which play a vital role in protecting the body from infectious agents and toxins in the environment. The airways protect the body by generating and clearing mucus, which is largely produced by the airways' specialized mucus glands.

Health - 28.06.2011
New airway stem cell
Researchers at UCLA have identified a new stem cell that participates in the repair of the lungs' large airways, which play a vital role in protecting the body from infectious agents and toxins in the environment. The airways protect the body by generating and clearing mucus, which is largely produced by the airways' specialized mucus glands.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2011
Biomedical Engineers Develop New Approach to Study Stem Cell Function
Cell Polarity and Chirality: Human endothelial cells on a micropatterned ring (inner diameter: 250 mm, width: 200 mm) stained for actin (red), tubulin (green), and nuclei (blue). Cells form a 'rightward' chiral alignment, while polarized by positioning their centrosomes (bright green) rather than cell nuclei closer to each boundary.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
Living antibiotic effective against Salmonella
Living antibiotic effective against Salmonella
Scientists have tested a predatory bacterium — Bdellovibrio — against Salmonella in the guts of live chickens. They found that it significantly reduced the numbers of Salmonella bacteria and, importantly, showed that Bdellovibrio are safe when ingested. The research, carried out by Professor Liz Sockett's team in the School of Biology at The University of Nottingham together with Robert Atterbury and Professor Paul Barrow in The University of Nottingham's School of Veterinary Medicine and Science was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

Health - Psychology - 27.06.2011
Premature babies risk mental health problems, say experts
Premature or low birthweight babies are more than three times more likely to suffer from anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence than full-term infants, according to psychologists at the University of Birmingham. Professor Stephen Wood, working with co-investigators at the University of Melbourne in Australia, conducted a meta-analysis of ten studies into mental health outcomes in children born prematurely.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
Team identifies new breast cancer tumor suppressor and how it works
Team identifies new breast cancer tumor suppressor and how it works
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers have identified a protein long known to regulate gene expression as a potent suppressor of breast cancer growth. Their study, in the journal Oncogene, is the first to demonstrate how this protein, known as Runx3, accomplishes this feat.  "People suggested that Runx3 might be a tumor suppressor in breast cancer because they found that it is down-regulated in a lot of breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tissues," said University of Illinois medical biochemistry professor Lin-Feng Chen, who led the study.

Economics / Business - Health - 27.06.2011
Kids' exposure to junk food ads unchanged despite regulations
Kids’ exposure to junk food ads unchanged despite regulations
Children's exposure to television advertising for unhealthy fast food has remained unchanged since the introduction of industry self-regulation, according to new research from the University of Sydney. The research, led by dietician Lana Hebden and published in the Medical Journal of Australia today, analysed all TV ads broadcast during a four-day sample period, in both May 2009 and April 2010.

Health - 26.06.2011
350 million adults have diabetes: study reveals the scale of global epidemic
A major international study collating and analysing worldwide data on diabetes since 1980 has found that the number of adults with the disease reached 347 million in 2008, more than double the number in 1980. The research, published today in The Lancet , reveals that the prevalence of diabetes has risen or at best remained unchanged in virtually every part of the world over the last three decades.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.06.2011
Hitting moving RNA drug targets
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—By accounting for the floppy, fickle nature of RNA, researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Irvine have developed a new way to search for drugs that target this important molecule. Their work appears in June 26. Once thought to be a passive carrier of genetic information, RNA now is understood to perform a number of other vital roles in the cell, and its malfunction can lead to disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2011
Genetic-screening trial could reduce drug side-effects
Genetic-screening trial could reduce drug side-effects
Patients with a range of common inflammatory diseases that also have genetic variations leading to low levels of a particular enzyme in their bodies are at greater risk of suffering side-effects from the widely-used drug azathioprine. Researchers at The University of Manchester and the National Institute for Health Research's Manchester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) recruited 333 patients and carried out genetic screening tests on half of them to see if they could identify those with variants in the gene that makes the enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2011
Biologists discover how yeast cells reverse aging
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Human cells have a finite lifespan: They can only divide a certain number of times before they die. However, that lifespan is reset when reproductive cells are formed, which is why the children of a 20-year-old man have the same life expectancy as those of an 80-year-old man. How that resetting occurs in human cells is not known, but MIT biologists have now found a gene that appears to control this process in yeast.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.06.2011
Sound, vision & hearing loss
Sound, vision & hearing loss
Science | Health Cath Harris | 23 Jun 11 The mechanisms used by the brain to distinguish contrasting sounds may be similar to those used to visually pick out a face in the crowd. Scientists at Oxford University's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics are studying the ways in which sound is represented in the brain and their latest research, published in the journal Neuron , looks at how the brain's nerve cells respond to sounds heard under different conditions.

Health - 23.06.2011
High sugar and fat diet ’may increase cell damage during sleep’
Continuing sleepless nights can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and even death for sufferers of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) who regularly stop breathing during the night for brief periods of time. A new research study by scientists at the University of Birmingham is seeking to establish the effects of a high sugar and fat intake on OSA and its consequences.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.06.2011
Baltic flora of bacterial plankton mapped out
Baltic flora of bacterial plankton mapped out
Using advanced DNA sequencing technology, researchers at KTH in an international research collaboration have created a three dimensional map of the distribution of thousands of bacterial plankton species in the Baltic Sea. Since bacteria play key roles in various nutrient cycles in the marine environment, this is important work in order to understand how the Baltic Sea's ecosystem functions.

Health - 22.06.2011
Angioplasty with stents may be safe for heart patients
Heart bypass surgery is considered the gold standard for most patients with left main coronary artery disease, one of the most serious types of heart disease and one that affects thousands. But a new UCLA study reports favorable long-term outcomes for lower-risk patients with this condition who underwent angioplasty with medication-coated stents, rather than bypass surgery.

Health - Psychology - 22.06.2011
Brief exam diagnoses cognitive impairment in ALS patients
Hershey, Pa. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could lose brain function earlier than is noticeably detectable, affecting their ability to make decisions about their care. Physicians need a method to assess these sensitive changes in brain function, without the need for extensive neuropsychological tests.

Health - History / Archeology - 22.06.2011
Slowing the spread of drug-resistant diseases Is goal of new research
Slowing the spread of drug-resistant diseases Is goal of new research
In the war between drugs and drug-resistant diseases, is the current strategy for medicating patients giving many drug-resistant diseases a big competitive advantage? That is the question being asked in a research paper that will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The paper argues for new research efforts to discover effective ways for managing the evolution and slowing the spread of drug-resistant disease organisms.

Health - 22.06.2011
Smoking during pregnancy increases children's heart disease risk factors
Smoking during pregnancy increases children’s heart disease risk factors
University of Sydney researchers have discovered that children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy had lower levels of the type of cholesterol known to protect against heart disease in later life - high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. By the age of eight children born to mothers who smoked while they were pregnant had HDL cholesterol levels of about 1.3 millimoles per litre (mmol/L) compared to the more normal level of 1.5 mmol/L in children whose mothers had not smoked.

Health - History / Archeology - 22.06.2011
Ethical dilemmas when elective surgery is cancelled
[NEWS, 22 June 2011] Planned operations are sometimes cancelled when the health care system is overwhelmed by emergency cases. Hospitals lose money and efficiency decreases, and patients who have prepared have their surgery cancelled. In an article in the scientific journal Clinical Ethics, researchers at Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet and the Karolinska University Hospital claim that this has ethical, psychological and medical consequences.