news

« BACK

Health



Results 161 - 180 of 19729.
« Previous 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 987 Next »


Health - Campus - 06.02.2024
World-first discovery may enable an effective long-term lupus treatment
Australian researchers have worked out how to fix a defect that causes lupus, and hope their world-first discovery will offer effective long-term treatment. Published in Nature Communications , the Monash University-led study found a way to reprogram the defective cells of lupus patients with protective molecules from healthy people.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2024
Scientists pinpoint key to evolution of bird flight
Scientists pinpoint key to evolution of bird flight
Scientists pinpoint growth of brain's cerebellum as key to evolution of bird flight By pairing PET scans of modern pigeons with studies of dinosaur fossils, scientists learn why some vertebrates fly Evolutionary biologists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have combined PET scans of modern pigeons along with studies of dinosaur fossils to help answer an enduring question in biology: How did the brains of birds evolve to enable them to fly? The answer, they say, appears to be an adaptive increase in the size of the cerebellum in some fossil vertebrates.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2024
Bacteria increase risk of skin inflammation during radiotherapy
Bacteria increase risk of skin inflammation during radiotherapy
Cancer treatment: possible trigger for radiodermatitis identified During radiotherapy, some cancer patients develop radiodermatitis, a severe inflammation of the skin. A recent study suggests that skin bacteria play an essential role in this: Breast cancer patients whose skin microbiome was disturbed prior to treatment also developed radiodermatitis.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.02.2024
The Influence of the Cellular Environment on Vision
The Influence of the Cellular Environment on Vision
The environment of retinal nerve cells plays a crucial role in the processing of visual signals. The processing of visual information begins with a targeted and balanced communication between nerve cells in the retina via synapses. Proteins in the vicinity of nerve cells play an important role in the development, maturation, and function of these synapses.

Physics - Health - 05.02.2024
Visualising multiple sclerosis with a new MRI procedure
Visualising multiple sclerosis with a new MRI procedure
The loss of myelin sheaths in the brain is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed an MRI method that maps the condition of this nerve insulation layer more accurately than before. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease that usually leads to permanent disabilities.

Sport - Health - 05.02.2024
Sticking with sport during school years linked to academic success
First longitudinal study following Australian children's sports participation and academic outcomes As school and summer sports resume, a new study from the University of Sydney finds links between kids' long-term participation in sport and increased academic performance, including impacts on NAPLAN scores, absenteeism and likelihood to attend university.

Health - 05.02.2024
TU Delft develops model to better understand injuries to babies caused by violent shaking
Shaking a baby violently can cause head and neck injuries, blindness and in some cases even death. Researchers at TU Delft, faculty of Mechanical Engineering, are using a dummy baby and computer models to map the accelerations that act on the head during shaking. They want to be able to assess the risk of injury more accurately.

Health - Computer Science - 05.02.2024
Doctors have more difficulty diagnosing disease when looking at images of darker skin
Dermatologists and general practitioners are somewhat less accurate in diagnosing disease in darker skin, a new study finds. Used correctly, AI may be able to help. When diagnosing skin diseases based solely on images of a patient's skin, doctors do not perform as well when the patient has darker skin, according to a new study from MIT researchers.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.02.2024
Innovative modelling may help breast cancer patients who don't respond to treatment
Monash University-led research is using maths to predict how new combination therapies can help patients with breast cancer who no longer respond to conventional therapies. Published in NPJ Precision Oncology , the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) study investigated breast cancer driven by a specific protein, PI3K, and how new combination therapies could effectively shut it down.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.02.2024
Small RNAs help skin wounds heal faster with minimal scarring, find scientists
Stock-photo-dna-helix-gene-molecule-spiral-loop-d-genetic-chromosome-cell-dna-molecule-spiral-of-blue-light-1559659808.jpg DNA helix, gene molecule spiral loop, 3D genetic chromosome cell. DNA molecule spiral of blue light on black background for molecular genetic science, genome biotechnology and health medicine A class of molecules playing a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression and other cellular processes can restore normal skin structure rather than producing a scar, a University of Manchester led study in mice and humans suggests.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.02.2024
Blood test could reveal cause of brain injury in newborn babies
Blood test could reveal cause of brain injury in newborn babies
Researchers from Imperial College London have shown that a blood test can pinpoint the underlying cause of brain injury in newborns. Their study looked at babies with a type of brain injury caused by hypoxia - a lack of oxygen. It found that patterns of gene expression that are detectable in the blood can point to the cause of the injury and tell doctors if the newborn is likely to respond to cooling treatment, commonly used to treat brain injury in infants.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.02.2024
How stigma hurts trans health
Researchers demonstrate a link between transgender people's exposure to gender-related stigma and cortisol, a key hormone in the stress response. For transgender and nonbinary people, feeling connected to one's community may alleviate the adverse health effects of chronic exposure to stigma, the latest findings of a U.S.-Canada study suggests.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.02.2024
Machine learning to battle COVID-19 bacterial co-infection
Machine learning to battle COVID-19 bacterial co-infection
University of Queensland researchers have used machine learning to help predict the risk of secondary bacterial infections in hospitalised COVID-19 patients. The machine learning technique can help detect whether antibiotic use is critical for patients with these infections. Associate Professor Kirsty Short from the School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said secondary bacterial infections can be extremely dangerous for those hospitalised with COVID-19.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.02.2024
Immune cells lose 'killer instinct' in cancerous tumours - but functionality can be re-awakened
Immune cells lose ’killer instinct’ in cancerous tumours - but functionality can be re-awakened
First study tracking how NK cells respond in tumours found that stimulating the IL-15 pathway prevented the rapid loss of function and improved tumour control Some immune cells in our bodies see their 'killer instinct' restricted after entering solid tumours, according to new research. In a new paper published in Nature Communications , a team led by researchers from the University of Birmingham and the University of Cambridge found how immune cells called natural killer cells (NK cells) rapidly lose their functionality when entering and residing in tumours.

Campus - Health - 02.02.2024
AI helps reveal the ancient origin story of floral colours
AI helps reveal the ancient origin story of floral colours
New research led by Monash University experts used computer simulations to reveal the ancient link between bees and the evolution of colours in flowers. Lead author and NativeBee+Tech Facility Director Associate Professor Alan Dorin, from the Faculty of Information Technology, said insects like bees developed visual perception well before the first flowers appeared so that they could fly and orient themselves among rocks, leaves, sticks and bark.

Environment - Health - 01.02.2024
Scientists measure air pollution from domestic wood burners in new study
Researchers have started a six-week study to measure airborne pollutant emissions from domestic wood burning stoves, using a dedicated laboratory-based test facility at The University of Manchester. Atmospheric chemists from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science , University of Manchester, and University of York are working together to quantify the gases and aerosols that come from stoves in people's homes.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2024
Neuromodulation: Ultrasound Leads to Braver Behavior in Situations of Mental Conflict
Neuromodulation: Ultrasound Leads to Braver Behavior in Situations of Mental Conflict
Psychologists at the University of Würzburg have investigated the extent to which neuromodulation of the brain with ultrasound waves influences people's behavior. The results can also be used as a basis for therapeutic purposes. When a new opportunity opens up for people, there are some who tend to take the pessimistic view: "It's no good anyway!".

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2024
Zebrafish Navigate to Find Their Comfortable Temperature
Zebrafish Navigate to Find Their Comfortable Temperature
Researchers from Bonn and Munich also find "thermostat" in the animals' brains Zebrafish are smaller than your little finger, with a brain no more than half the size of a pinhead. Yet these animals possess an efficient navigation system that enables them to find their way back to spots in the water where the temperature suits them.

Health - 01.02.2024
Improving cancer prevention among people experiencing homelessness
While people experiencing homelessness are more exposed to cancer-associated risk factors, there is a lack of awareness and structures for targeted cancer prevention. Yet people experiencing homelessness are twice as likely to be affected by cancer as people who are resident. Against this backdrop, an international team led by Igor Grabovac and Maren Jeleff from MedUni Vienna's Center for Public Health has systematically assessed the health challenges of this population group for the first time in order to create a scientifically sound basis for the development of preventive measures.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2024
Resistant bacteria can remain in the body for years
Resistant bacteria can remain in the body for years
Fighting disease-causing bacteria becomes more difficult when antibiotics stop working. People with pre-existing conditions in particular can carry resistant germs and suffer from repeated infections for years, according to a study by the University and University Hospital of Basel. Pneumonia, urinary tract infections, sepsis: diseases like these can become fatal without antibiotics.
« Previous 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 987 Next »