news

« BACK

Health



Results 16281 - 16300 of 16726.


Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2010
Histone H1 regulates gene activity throughout the cell cycle
Histone H1 regulates gene activity throughout the cell cycle
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A protein that helps pack DNA into the cell nucleus has an important role in regulating gene activity, scientists report. The researchers found that the protein, histone H1, also takes part in the formation of ribosomes, the cellular workbenches on which all proteins are made. The study appeared online May 3 in The Journal of Cell Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.06.2010
Research: Major breakthrough will revolutionize the screening and treatment of genetic diseases
An international first: a research team at MUHC/McGill validates the effectiveness of a rapid genome sequencing process for hereditary genetic diseases A research team led by Dr. Nada Jabado at the MUHC Research Institute (RI MUHC) and Dr. Jacek Majewski at McGill University has proven for the first time that it is possible to identify any genetic disease in record time thanks to a powerful and reliable exome sequencing method.

Health - 29.06.2010
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson’s disease transplant treatment
Researchers overcome major obstacle in transplant treatment to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease - News Release Issued by the Medical Research Council Embargoed until 1900 UK Time 30 June 2010 Researchers funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Imperial College London have overcome a major obstacle in the development of a transplant treatment which could relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, according to new research published today.

Health - 29.06.2010
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson’s disease transplant treatment
Reversal of fortune for Parkinson's disease transplant treatment Researchers overcome major obstacle in transplant treatment to relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease Issued by the Medical Research Council Embargoed until 1900 UK Time 30 June 2010 Researchers funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Imperial College London have overcome a major obstacle in the development of a transplant treatment which could relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, according to new research published today.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2010
Researchers Show How Active Immune Tolerance Makes Pregnancy Possible
Understanding of mouse immune-system response to specific fetal antigens also may provide insight into issues that arise during human pregnancies PASADENA, Calif.—The concept of pregnancy makes no sense—at least not from an immunological point of view. After all, a fetus, carrying half of its father's genome, is biologically distinct from its mother.

Health - 29.06.2010
With fasting, enzyme turns off body’s production of fats, cholesterol
Fasting helps cause an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol, Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have found. The findings could lead to new approaches to treating elevated cholesterol and lipid levels . The researchers' report, published today in Genes & Development , describes how SIRT1, one of a group of enzymes called sirtuins, suppresses the activity of a family of proteins called SREBPs, which control the body's synthesis and handling of fats and cholesterol.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2010
Importance of cell-cell communication
Importance of cell-cell communication
A team from the Bristol Heart Institute have investigated the importance of cell-cell communication in regulating the formation of new blood vessels following the restriction in blood supply to the heart or back leg in mice. The research, by Paolo Madeddu, Professor of Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine and his team in the Bristol Heart Institute (BHI) at the University of Bristol, was funded by the British Heart Foundation and is published in the leading journal Circulation Research .

Health - Psychology - 29.06.2010
Research links workplace bullying with ill-health
A new study by the University of Sheffield has uncovered new evidence of a strong link between workplace bullying and the subsequent psychological ill-health of employees. The study, which was funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), found that bullying from organisational insiders, for example colleagues, subordinates and superiors, significantly influenced levels of stress reported seven months later.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2010
Prolonged altitude training could reduce endurance
Prolonged altitude training could reduce endurance
New research suggests that athletes and footballers may want to limit the time they spend training at altitude to improve their performance. An Oxford University study has found that people with a rare condition that mimics being at high altitude for long periods show metabolic differences that actually reduce their endurance and physical performance.

Health - 29.06.2010
Overall safety of statins confirmed
Overall safety of statins confirmed
The use of statins in patients without a prior history of heart attacks and strokes is of little real benefit in preventing deaths in the short term - the largest study of its type to date has found. Researchers from the University of Cambridge and St George's Hospital, London analysed data from 65,000 participants around the world in 11 randomized controlled trials.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2010
South Asians have highest rate of heart disease in UK
South Asians have highest rate of heart disease in UK
The burden of heart disease among ethnic minorities in the UK is revealed in a new report compiled by Oxford University researchers for the British Heart Foundation. The figures suggest that while the South Asian population suffers the highest rates of heart disease, many could be missing out on access to some treatments.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2010
12 new genes linked to type 2 diabetes
12 new genes linked to type 2 diabetes
Twelve new genes associated with type 2 diabetes have been identified in the largest study yet of the connections between differences in people's DNA and their risk of diabetes. The international consortium of scientists, led by Professor Mark McCarthy of the University of Oxford, report their findings in the journal Nature Genetics.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.06.2010
Protein restores vision in blind animals
Protein restores vision in blind animals
Scientists restore vision in retinitis pigmentosa using an archaebacterial protein.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.06.2010
Diabetes doubles risk of heart attack and strokes
Diabetes doubles risk of heart attack and strokes
Having diabetes doubles the risk of developing a wide range of blood vessel diseases, including heart attacks and different types of stroke, researchers in Cambridge have found. Diabetes is now estimated to be responsible for 1 in every 10 deaths from cardiovascular disease, or about 325,000 cardiovascular deaths per year in all industrialised countries put together.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.06.2010
Gene study offers diabetes hope
Working as part of an international consortium, the scientists conducted the largest study yet of the connections between differences in people's The team, including Dr Jim Wilson of the University's Centre for Population Health Sciences, reports their findings in the journal Nature Genetics. "The signals we have identified provide important clues to the biological basis of type 2 diabetes," says project leader Professor McCarthy of Oxford University.

Health - Economics / Business - 24.06.2010
Health of future generations determined by childhood conditions
Health of future generations determined by childhood conditions
A growing body of economic research, published in the latest issue of Research in Public Policy, finds compelling evidence that the conditions to which children are exposed in their early and even foetal years can dramatically affect their future. Researchers for the University of Bristol's Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) looked at the health and cognitive development of children from across the world and concluded that investments made during critical periods in a child's lifespan can lead to significant returns, while failure to invest can lead to irreversible damage.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.06.2010
Parkinson's patients risky behaviour explained
Parkinson’s patients risky behaviour explained
Scientists at UCL have explained Parkinson's patients' risky behaviour, a rare side effect of standard treatments for the disease. The finding has implications for future medication of patients. The standard treatments for Parkinson's disease, which work by increasing dopamine signalling in the brain, can trigger highly risky behaviours, known as 'impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviours? (ICBs) in approximately 5-10% of patients.

Health - Environment - 24.06.2010
New Study Links One in Five Deaths in Bangladesh to Arsenic in the Drinking Water
' Environmental Health ' Research & Service ' New Study Links One in Five Deaths in Bangladesh to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Increased Mortality is Linked to Chronic Diseases with a 70 percent increased mortality risk among those with the highest level of exposure Between 33 and 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to arsenic in the drinking water'a catastrophe that the World Health Organization has called 'the largest mass poisoning in history.

Health - Chemistry - 24.06.2010
Chemists find an easier way to synthesize new drug candidates
Chemists find an easier way to synthesize new drug candidates
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Some drugs may be more effective the longer they last inside the body. To prevent such drugs from being broken down too rapidly, pharmaceutical manufacturers often attach a fluorine-containing structure called a trifluoromethyl group. However, the processes now used require harsh reaction conditions or only work in a small number of cases, limiting their usefulness for synthesizing new drug candidates for testing.

Psychology - Health - 24.06.2010
Study: Moms’ favoritism tied to depression in adulthood
Whether mom's golden child or her black sheep, siblings who sense that their mother consistently favors or rejects one child over others are more likely to show depressive symptoms as middle-aged adults, finds a new study by Cornell gerontologist Karl Pillemer.