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Health - Life Sciences - 01.03.2010
New research may reveal clue to early onset Parkinson´s
New research may reveal clue to early onset Parkinson´s
The study, funded by the Parkinson´s Disease Society and published online by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today (2 March 2010), identified for the first time how two genes, parkin and PINK1 - work together to remove damaged mitochondria from nerve cells. People with Parkinson´s don´t have enough of the chemical dopamine because nerve cells in the brain die, and nerve cells lost to Parkinson´s often contain damaged mitochondria.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.03.2010
Pesticide atrazine can turn male frogs into females
Pesticide atrazine can turn male frogs into females
An atrazine-induced female frog (a genetic male) is shown (bottom) copulating with an unexposed male sibling. This union produced viable eggs and larvae that survived to metamorphosis and adulthood. Yet, because both animals were genetic males, the offspring were all males. (Tyrone Hayes photo) BERKELEY — Atrazine, one of the world's most widely used pesticides, wreaks havoc with the sex lives of adult male frogs, emasculating three-quarters of them and turning one in 10 into females, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, biologists.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.03.2010
Researchers Discover Weak Link in Alzheimer’s Drug Candidates
Ratnesh Lal, a UCSD bioengineering and mechanical engineering professor, led a multi-disciplinary team of researchers in a breakthrough discovery relating to Alzheimer's disease. Some current therapies being investigated for Alzheimer's disease may cause further neural degeneration and cell death, according to a breakthrough discovery by UC San Diego researchers.

Health - 01.03.2010
Omega-3 possible weapon against neural tumours in children
In a newly published study, Swedish and American scientists show how the Omega-3 fatty acid DHA can serve as both sword and shield in the fight against certain forms of cancer. The new findings on the mechanisms behind this two-sided effect give hope of one day using DHA as a complement to cytostatics in the treatment of children with neural cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.02.2010
Resting brain reveals connections
Resting brain reveals connections
Science | Health Jonathan Wood Images of the brain with various areas 'lighting up' in a rainbow of colours are now pretty familiar to many of us. These come from studies in which people are given tasks to do inside MRI scanners, and the areas that light up show where there is increased brain activity as a result.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.02.2010
Surgery halves death risk for stroke patients versus stent treatment
Surgery halves death risk for stroke patients versus stent treatment
People at high risk of having a stroke are half as likely to have a stroke or die following surgery to repair damage to an artery in the neck, rather than 'stenting' treatment, according to UCL research published in the Lancet today. These findings emerged from a major trial carried out at the UCL Institute of Neurology, which was funded by the Medical Research Council and The Stroke Association.  'Stenting' is a treatment that relieves pressure in the carotid artery using a wire mesh tube or 'stent', which is then fed through to the neck using a catheter in the groin.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.02.2010
Scientists reveal driving force behind evolution
Scientists reveal driving force behind evolution
Liverpool, UK - 25 February 2010: Scientists at the University of Liverpool have provided the first experimental evidence that shows that evolution is driven most powerfully by interactions between species, rather than adaptation to the environment. The team observed viruses as they evolved over hundreds of generations to infect bacteria.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.02.2010
UCLA study finds genetic link between misery and death
UCLA study finds genetic link between misery and death
In ongoing work to identify how genes interact with social environments to impact human health, UCLA researchers have discovered what they describe as a biochemical link between misery and death. In addition, they found a specific genetic variation in some individuals that seems to disconnect that link, rendering them more biologically resilient in the face of adversity.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.02.2010
Hospital-based initiative significantly improves stroke patient care and outcomes, study finds
Care and clinical outcomes for acute stroke patients have improved significantly at hospitals participating in an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association quality-improvement program, according to a new academic study that examined the first million patients enrolled. To better characterize contemporary stroke patients and determine the impact of participation in the Get With the Guidelines?Stroke program, researchers analyzed several aspects of care for these 1 million patients, who were treated at 1,392 hospitals participating in the initiative between 2003 and 2009.

Physics - Health - 23.02.2010
Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named president of TMS
Scientist named at annual meeting of the The Minerals, Metals LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 24, 2010—Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow George T. "Rusty" Gray III was selected as 2010 president of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) during the society's annual meeting this month in Seattle, Washington.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 23.02.2010
Operation of heartburn provides little protection against esophageal cancer
Severe heartburn is the most important risk factor for suffering from glandular cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma) in the esophagus. Scientists have therefore hoped that surgery for heartburn should have a protective effect against this aggressive cancer. However, a large Swedish study, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, show that patients who undergo surgery for heartburn still are in high risk of having esophageal cancer a long time after they have had surgery.

Economics / Business - Health - 22.02.2010
Was post-communist mass privatisation a serial killer?
Was post-communist mass privatisation a serial killer?
Dr Christopher Gerry explains why and how a UCL team re-examined evidence for the controversial claim that rapid economic reforms in 1990s post-Communist Europe led to the deaths of thousands. The claim has been hotly debated in the pages of the Economist, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times and elsewhere, ever since the 2009 claim, published in the Lancet, that rapid mass privatisation had resulted in large increases in mortality among working aged males.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.02.2010
Research identifies mechanism that makes cells become tumorous
Researchers from the Peninsula Medical School in Plymouth (UK), the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, Cornell University in New York, Weil Medical College in New York and the Center for Neural Tumour Research in Los Angeles, have for the first time identified a key mechanism that makes certain cells become tumorous in the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.02.2010
UM Biologist Helps Sequence Aphid Genome
UM Biologist Helps Sequence Aphid Genome
February 23, 2010 — Coral Gables — For the first time, scientists have sequenced the entire genome of the pea aphid, a notorious horticultural and agricultural pest. The findings reveal the extent of the genetic collaboration of the aphid host with its bacterial symbiont, which may account for some of the extraordinary characteristics of this insect.

Health - 21.02.2010
Testosterone deficiency affects male cancer survivors´ quality of life
Testosterone deficiency affects male cancer survivors´ quality of life
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have found that many male cancer survivors who develop testosterone deficiency after receiving chemotherapy or radiation therapy have an impaired quality of life and reduced energy levels. Published online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that young male cancer survivors with testosterone deficiency may benefit from testosterone replacement therapy.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2010
UCLA study reveals how genes interact with environment to cause disease
A new UCLA study reveals how human genes interact with their environment to boost disease risk. Published in the Feb. 18 online edition of the American Journal of Human Genetics, the findings shed light on why the search for specific gene variants linked to human diseases can only partly explain common disorders.

Health - 18.02.2010
UC Studies Show Marijuana Has Therapeutic Value, Reports to Legislature
Researchers from the University of California's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) have found 'reasonable evidence that cannabis is a promising treatment' for some specific, pain-related medical conditions.

Health - History / Archeology - 18.02.2010
Battlefield camaraderie yields long-term dividends for veterans, study finds
Veterans who served in military units characterized by a strong esprit de corps were much less likely decades later to die of a stroke or heart condition than veterans from less cohesive companies, two UCLA economists have found. "On the battlefield, you'd expect your buddy to have your back," said Dora Kosta, the study's lead author and a UCLA professor of economics.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2010
Defective Signaling Pathway Sheds Light on Cystic Fibrosis
In a study that could lead to new therapeutic targets for patients with the cystic fibrosis, a research team from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified a defective signaling pathway that contributes to disease severity. In the study, published in the journal Nature Medicine , the researchers report that defective signaling for a protein called the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g (PPAR-g) accounts for a portion of disease symptoms in cystic fibrosis, and that correction of the defective pathway reduces symptoms of the disease in mice.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.02.2010
Anti-inflammatory signal protein discovered
Anti-inflammatory signal protein discovered
Researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have discovered a protein that is crucial in mediating the anti-inflammatory actions of nuclear lipid receptors. The findings, published in the research journal Genes & Development, link lipid metabolism and inflammation and open up new possibilities for developing treatments of metabolic diseases associated with inflammation, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis.