news

« BACK

Health



Results 16381 - 16400 of 16726.


Health - 29.04.2010
Swedes are less active than we think we are
[NEWS 20 April 2010] Swedish younger males are less active than US younger males. Swedish females have higher physical activity than US females, across all age groups. This is shown in a first time ever comparison of physical activity between two countries population. The results was newly published by researchers from Karolinska Institutet in the scientific journal "American Journal of Epidemiology" To date, international comparisons of physical activity levels in adults have been based on self-report.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 28.04.2010
Smoking during pregnancy may be linked to teenage obesity
Smoking during pregnancy may be linked to teenage obesity
PA 103/10 Smoking during pregnancy is a known risk factor for a variety of health problems for the baby, including low birth weight, respiratory issues and even sudden infant death syndrome. Now a new study suggests exposure to cigarette smoke in the womb may also contribute to another problem — abdominal obesity in late adolescence.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.04.2010
Nearly 4 million Californians report sexual or physical violence from a spouse or companion
Nearly 4 million adults in California reported being a victim of physical or sexual violence at the hands of a spouse, companion or other intimate partner, according to a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Although reported incidences of intimate partner violence, or IPV, are widespread, especially among women and certain ethnic groups, reported IPV was surprisingly high among lesbians, gays and bisexuals in California, who are almost twice as likely to experience violence as heterosexual adults, researchers said.

Health - Administration - 28.04.2010
Causes of death in AIDS patients
Causes of death in AIDS patients
New research shows that Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) continues to dramatically reduce rates of mortality from HIV infection in high-income countries, such that non-AIDS-related deaths exceed AIDS deaths after approximately four years of taking ART. The study, by researchers from the University of Bristol and a large group of international collaborators, examined data from the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) which involved nearly 40,000 patients who started ART between 1996 and 2006 in Europe and North America.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 27.04.2010
New microscopy technique reveals mechanics of blood cell membranes
New microscopy technique reveals mechanics of blood cell membranes
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thanks to an interdisciplinary team of researchers, scientists now have a more complete understanding of one of the human body's most vital structures: the red blood cell. Led by University of Illinois electrical and computer engineering professor Gabriel Popescu, the team developed a model that could lead to breakthroughs in screening and treatment of blood-cell-morphology diseases, such as malaria and sickle-cell disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.04.2010
Chimps carry mummified infants
Chimps carry mummified infants
New observations of wild chimpanzees in Bossou, Guinea, have given insights into the behaviour of chimp mothers who carry the mummified remains of their dead infants with them. An international team report in Current Biology that, in late 2003, an outbreak of respiratory disease in Bossou killed five chimps, including two infants.

Health - 26.04.2010
Stem cells from surgery leftovers could repair damaged hearts
Stem cells from surgery leftovers could repair damaged hearts
Scientists have for the first time succeeded in extracting vital stem cells from sections of vein removed for heart bypass surgery. Researchers funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) found that these stem cells can stimulate new blood vessels to grow, which could potentially help repair damaged heart muscle after a heart attack.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.04.2010
Scientists discover traitor human DNA helps viruses cause cancer
Scientists discover traitor human DNA helps viruses cause cancer
UCL scientists have discovered that stretches of human DNA act as a traitor to the body's defences by helping viruses infect people and trigger cancer-causing diseases. The research, which was undertaken at the UCL Cancer Institute and funded by Cancer Research UK, and published in Nature Cell Biology today, revealed that viruses can exploit the body's DNA ' dampening its antiviral immune response and allowing infection to take hold more easily.

Health - 23.04.2010
Warfarin: patient knows best
Warfarin: patient knows best
An Oxford-led review published last week in the Cochrane Library - that gold-standard source for the best evidence-based medical care - showed how empowering people at risk of blood clots to determine their own dose of anti-clotting drugs leads to a large drop in adverse events and deaths. Carl Heneghan from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine [ CEBM ] at the University of Oxford and colleagues found a 50 per cent drop in the number of blood clots and a 36 per cent reduction in deaths among those patients who were able to monitor their own anti-clotting therapy.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.04.2010
Body builders - the worms that point the way to understanding tissue regeneration
Body builders - the worms that point the way to understanding tissue regeneration
University of Nottingham News Press releases 2010 April Body builders - the worms that point the way to understanding tissue regeneration PA 93/10 Scientists at The University of Nottingham have discovered the gene that enables an extraordinary worm to regenerate its own body parts after amputation — including a whole head and brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.04.2010
Gut Microbial Equilibrium linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Gut Microbial Equilibrium linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease
PASADENA, Calif.—We are not alone—even in our own bodies. The human gut is home to 100 trillion bacteria, which, for millions of years, have co-evolved along with our digestive and immune systems. Most people view bacteria as harmful pathogens that cause infections and disease. Other, more agreeable, microbes (known as symbionts) have taken a different evolutionary path, and have established beneficial relationships with their hosts.

Health - Environment - 22.04.2010
Proof that airports are air polluters
Proof that airports are air polluters
Scientists in the Environmental Research Group (ERG) at King's have undertaken research into the effects of the closure of UK airspace on air quality surrounding major airports after the Icelandic volcano eruption, following a number of enquiries from the public. In response the ERG analysed the concentrations of NOX (the generic term for oxides of nitrogen combined) and NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) surrounding Gatwick and Heathrow airports during the first three days of closure, Thursday 15 to Saturday 17 April 2010.

Economics / Business - Health - 22.04.2010
Sports stars are no role models, say scientists
The loutish and drunken behaviour of some of our sporting heroes – routinely reported in the media – has little or no effect on the drinking habits of young people, new research has found. Researchers at the Universities of Manchester, UK, and Western Sydney, Australia, say their findings – published in Drug and Alcohol Review – rubbish the idea that sports stars act as role models for those who follow sport.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 22.04.2010
Extreme obesity holds greater risks for pregnant women
Extreme obesity holds greater risks for pregnant women
One in every 1,100 pregnant women in the UK is extremely obese, a nationwide study by Oxford University researchers has shown. The researchers found that extremely obese women with a body mass index (BMI) of 50 or higher experience greatly increased risks of complications during pregnancy and that basic equipment for their care was not universally available.

Health - Computer Science - 21.04.2010
Health impacts of mobile phone use to be explored in huge new study
Health impacts of mobile phone use to be explored in huge new study
A new decades-long study launches today to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems such as cancer. The cohort study on mobile communications (COSMOS) forms part of the Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research (MTHR) Programme. The international study will run for 20-30 years and will follow the health of at least 250,000 participants aged 18-69 in five European countries.

Health - Chemistry - 20.04.2010
New test for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis
New test for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis
Researchers at King's College London's Twin Research Unit have discovered new ways of measuring metabolites in the blood which could be used to diagnose osteoarthritis earlier. Their new biochemical test called metabolomics allows the scientists to test for 163 chemical signals at the same time from a single blood sample.

Health - 20.04.2010
Severe asphyxia linked to substandard care during labour
Severe asphyxia linked to substandard care during labour
Asphyxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen to the fetus during labour and delivery. Although rare, it can lead to perinatal brain injury and perinatal death. Now, a new study from Karolinska Institutet shows that infants of women who received substandard care during labour had a three-fold increased risk of asphyxia at birth.

Health - 19.04.2010
Gender gap found in kissing disease
Researchers at the University found that on average female patients with the infection missed 16 hours of classes compared to three hours for infected male students. The results also show that students with glandular fever - also known as kissing disease - slept for three hours longer each day than healthy students.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.04.2010
Team to study health effects of botanical estrogens
Team to study health effects of botanical estrogens
Wild yam is among the many plants and plant extracts sold as "natural" treatments for the relief of menopausal symptoms. Creative commons photo by Marco Schmidt CHAMPAIGN, lll. An ongoing research initiative into the health effects of botanical estrogens will get an $8 million boost from the National Institutes of Health.

Health - Computer Science - 16.04.2010
Robotic therapy helps stroke patients regain function
Robotic therapy helps stroke patients regain function
A patient uses a robotic therapy device invented at MIT. The robotic joystick guides the patient's arm as he tries to move the robot handle toward a moving or stationary target shown on the computer monitor. If the person starts moving in the wrong direction or does not move, the robotic arm gently nudges his arm in the right direction.