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Health - Administration - 05.09.2011
Translators needed in UK GP surgeries say researchers
Professional interpreters are under-used in the NHS according to new research from the University of Birmingham. The researchers identify language barriers as an increasing obstacle to the provision of healthcare in a paper published in the journal PLoS ONE . Effective communication is instrumental in the delivery of healthcare support and a cross-sectional study of 41 general practices in the UK highlights language disparities between patients and healthcare professionals.

Health - Chemistry - 01.09.2011
Profiler at the cellular level
Researchers have successfully incorporated a diagnostic biological "computer" network in human cells. This network recognizes certain cancer cells using logic combinations of five cancer-specific molecular factors, triggering cancer cells destruction. Yaakov (Kobi) Benenson, from ETH Zurich, has spent a large part of his career developing biological computers that operate in living cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
Playing video games helps adults with lazy eye
Playing video games helps adults with lazy eye
Here are some words that few would have thought to put together: video game therapy. Yet, a pilot study has found that playing video games can help improve the vision of adults with amblyopia, or lazy eye. The study found that participants experienced marked improvement in visual acuity and 3-D depth perception after spending just 40 hours playing off-the-shelf video games.

Health - Chemistry - 31.08.2011
Ultrasensitive particles offer new way to find cancer
Tiny particles that measure microRNA levels in tissue samples could help diagnose and monitor many diseases. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ' About 10 years ago, scientists discovered a new type of genetic material called microRNA, which appears to turn genes on or off inside a cell. More recently, they found that these genetic snippets often go haywire in cancer cells, contributing to tumors' uncontrollable growth.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
Mechanisms that kill tumour cells mapped
HAMLET, a substance found in breast milk, has received a lot of attention for its ability to kill many different kinds of cancer cells without affecting adjacent healthy cells. In a major international collaboration, researchers at Lund University, who discovered HAMLET, are showing what it is that makes the substance lethal to tumour cells in particular.

Health - Chemistry - 30.08.2011
Flame retardants linked to lower birthweight babies
Flame retardants linked to lower birthweight babies
Exposure during pregnancy to flame retardant chemicals commonly found in the home is linked to lower birthweight babies, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health. In the study, to appear Tuesday, Aug. 30, in the peer-reviewed publication American Journal of Epidemiology , researchers found that every tenfold increase in levels of PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, in a mother's blood during pregnancy corresponded to a 115 gram (4.1 ounce) drop in her baby's birthweight.

Psychology - Health - 30.08.2011
Like mama bears, nursing mothers defend babies with a vengeance
Like mama bears, nursing mothers defend babies with a vengeance
Women who breast-feed are far more likely to demonstrate a "mama bear" effect — aggressively protecting their infants and themselves — than women who bottle-feed their babies or non-mothers, according to a new study in the September issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Health - Pedagogy - 30.08.2011
Parents’ stress leaves mark on the DNA of children
Media Inquiries news [a] uwhealth (p) org Related Information Department of Psychiatry Stay Connected Follow UWSMPH on Twitter Follow UWSMPH on Facebook Madison, Wisconsin - Parents who are stressed during their children's early years can leave an imprint on their sons' or daughters' genes - an imprint that lasts into adolescence and may affect how these genes are expressed later in life, according to a study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin and the University of British Columbia.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.08.2011
Six new genetic variants linked to type 2 diabetes discovered in South Asians
Six new genetic variants linked to type 2 diabetes discovered in South Asians
An international team of researchers has identified six new genetic variants associated with type-2 diabetes in South Asians. The findings, published , give scientists new leads in the search for diagnostic markers and drug targets to prevent and treat this major disease. People of South Asian ancestry are up to four times more likely than Europeans to develop type 2 diabetes, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.08.2011
Scientists uncover gene network responsible for repair of the central nervous system of the fruit fly
Glia that enwrap axons in the Drosophila larval ventral nerve cord. Credit: Kentaro Kato, University of Birmingham A gene network that controls repair to the central nervous system (CNS) after injury has been discovered in the fruit fly, Drosophila, by scientists at the University of Birmingham. This breakthrough may help to aid understanding of cell manipulation techniques necessary to repair damage to the human CNS, according to research published today (30 August) in the journal PLoS Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.08.2011
Combating fungal diseases
Combating fungal diseases
Scientists have discovered a potential new approach for inhibiting the growth of pathogenic fungi. Ultimately, immunocompromised patients with fungal infections, in particular, could benefit from this work. As temperatures soar and more and more people cool off at outdoor pools, the incidence of so called swimmer's ear - an infection of the ear canal - also rises.

Health - History / Archeology - 30.08.2011
Lack of comparative research into acne treatments could limit their effectiveness
Acne is a chronic disease which can be painful and disfiguring. Many treatments are publicised as cures for acne, often at considerable expense to the sufferer and the healthcare system. A new clinical review by experts at The University of Nottingham says there is very little research evidence to show which treatments work best and whether expensive treatments are any better than traditional ones.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.08.2011
Why Influenza B Virus Exclusively Infects Humans Opens Door For Drugs To Fight Seasonal Epidemics Caused By Virus
The three-dimensional structure of a site on an influenza B virus protein that suppresses human defenses to infection has been determined by researchers at Rutgers University and The University of Texas at Austin. Three-dimensional structure of a complex between influenza B virus protein, NS1B, represented as the solid form, and the human protein that fights infections, ISG15, represented as pink and magenta ribbons and strands.

Health - Administration - 25.08.2011
Results of medication studies may be misleading to readers
Results of medication studies may be misleading to readers
Studies about medications published in the most influential medical journals are frequently designed in a way that yields misleading or confusing results, new research suggests. Investigators from the medical schools at UCLA and Harvard analyzed all the randomized medication trials published in the six highest-impact general medicine journals between June 1, 2008, and Sept.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.08.2011
Breakthrough: Researchers find wide gap in immune responses of people who did or didn’t get the flu after exposure
Aug. Breakthrough: Researchers find wide gap in immune responses of people who did or didn't get the flu after exposure ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Why do some folks who take every precaution still get the flu, while others never even get the sniffles? It comes down to a person's immune system response to the flu virus, says Alfred Hero, professor at the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

Health - 24.08.2011
University research shapes new NICE guidelines on blood pressure
High blood pressure should be diagnosed using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (repeated measurements throughout a 24-hour period)), which is not only more clinically accurate than clinic-based measurements but is better value for money, according to University of Birmingham research published online today in the Lancet .

Health - Life Sciences - 24.08.2011
Breastfeeding and eczema research
A worldwide study led by King's researchers has found no clear evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for four months or longer protects against childhood eczema. The findings, published today in the British Journal of Dermatology , have prompted the researchers to call for a review of the current UK breastfeeding guidelines with regards to eczema.

Physics - Health - 23.08.2011
New research offers breakthrough in nanotechnology
New research offers breakthrough in nanotechnology
New research offers breakthrough in nanotechnology Experts from the University of Sheffield have shed new light on the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) on a nano scale, paving the way for improved medical imaging techniques, computing, tele, data storage and photovoltaics.

Health - Psychology - 23.08.2011
Extreme morning sickness could lead to lifelong emotional, behavioral disorders in kids
Extreme morning sickness could lead to lifelong emotional, behavioral disorders in kids
An extreme form of pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting known as hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) takes a heavy toll on thousands of women each year and can lead to hospitalization and pregnancy termination. But new research suggests pregnant women are not the only victims. A joint study by UCLA and the University of Southern California has found that children whose mothers suffered from HG while carrying them were 3.6 times more likely to suffer from anxiety, bipolar disorder and depression in adulthood than individuals whose mothers did not have the condition.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.08.2011
Gene controls common pathways in cancer progression
Gene controls common pathways in cancer progression
Mutations to a gene called p53 have been linked to half of all cancers, leading to tumor growth and the spread of cancerous cells. Now, a Cornell-led study identifies for the first time the mechanisms by which p53 controls cell movement and invasion into other areas of the body. Using cultures of ovarian surface epithelium cells, where ovarian cancer originates, the researchers found that when they inactivated the p53 gene, the cells began to move and invade the underlying gelatinous protein mixture used in the lab that resembles an extracellular tissue environment.