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Results 16401 - 16420 of 17626.


Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Innovation marks UW-Madison contribution to vitamins, drugs, medical supplies
With a long tradition of exploration of medicine and biology, and a research budget that has passed $1 billion, University of Wisconsin-Madison builds on a rich history of discoveries related to drugs and nutrition: Vitamin A and B were discovered here in 1914. In 1941, Karl Paul Link discovered coumarin, from which he synthesized the first widely effective rat poison, commonly known as Warfarin, and later the first medically safe and still widely used anticoagulant.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2011
New research redraws pancreas anatomy
Research from Karolinska Institutet shows that insulin secretion in the pancreas is not under direct neural control, as has previously been thought. The few nerves that are present are connected to blood vessels, not to gland cells. Thanks to the secretion of the correct amount of insulin and other hormones, the body is able to maintain an almost constant level of blood sugar.

Health - Computer Science - 01.07.2011
Health information technology poses no harm to nursing home residents
The federal government is pushing doctors and hospitals to convert to electronic medical records by 2015, touting reductions in costs, increased patient safety and greater efficiencies in the U.S. health care system. What's largely unknown is how the widespread adoption of computer technology affects the quality of medical care, particularly in nursing homes and other long-term care settings.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2011
Babies tune in to human voices even when asleep
Babies tune in to human voices even when asleep
In a study published in the journal Current Biology, researchers from Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) King's College London have found that babies as young as three months are able to tune in to the sound of our voices and perceive different emotions, even when they are asleep. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers took brain images of sleeping babies and discovered that special areas in the brain which process sound are more sensitive than previously thought.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2011
MicroRNAs in the songbird brain respond to new songs
MicroRNAs in the songbird brain respond to new songs
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Whenever it hears an unfamiliar song from a male of the same species, the zebra finch stops chirping, hopping and grooming. It listens attentively for minutes at a time, occasionally cocking its head but otherwise immobile. Once it becomes familiar with the song, it goes back to its busy routine.

Economics / Business - Health - 30.06.2011
TV food advertising increases children’s preference for unhealthy foods
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that children who watch adverts for unhealthy food on television are more likely to want to eat high-fat and high-sugar foods. The study by researchers in the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society examined the food preferences of a group of 281 children aged six to 13 years old from the North West of England.

Health - Environment - 30.06.2011
Farm animal disease to increase with climate change
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that recent climate change could have caused a serious infectious disease in farm animals to spread through Europe. Researchers looked at changes in the behaviour of bluetongue - a viral disease of cattle and sheep – from the 1960s to the present day, as well as what could happen to the transmission of the virus 40 years into the future.

Health - Veterinary - 30.06.2011
Breakthrough treatment for hurting horses
Breakthrough treatment for hurting horses
A new osteoarthritis drug combination trialled by University of Sydney researchers could significantly extend the working life of racing and other performance horses and could potentially benefit humans. Various medications have been assessed for the treatment of osteoarthritis in horses, but this is one of the first studies to show a new drug combination has the ability to slow down damage to joints, rather than just alleviate pain.

Health - History / Archeology - 29.06.2011
CT scans significantly more effective than chest X-rays in reducing lung cancer deaths
CT scans significantly more effective than chest X-rays in reducing lung cancer deaths
Current and former heavy smokers screened with low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning had a 20 percent greater reduction in lung cancer deaths than those screened with conventional chest X-rays, according to the results of a large, decade-long clinical trial involving more than 53,000 people.

Health - Chemistry - 29.06.2011
Preventing diabetes damage: Zinc’s effects on a kinky, two-faced cohort
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—In type 2 diabetes, a protein called amylin forms dense clumps that shut down insulin-producing cells, wreaking havoc on the control of blood sugar. But zinc has a knack for preventing amylin from misbehaving. Recent research at the University of Michigan offers new details about how zinc performs this "security guard" function.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2011
Supplement burns muscle fat, improves exercise performance
Supplement burns muscle fat, improves exercise performance
A new study has shown for the first time that taking a particular food supplement increases muscle carnitine content and reduces muscle carbohydrate use, while increasing fat used for energy production during exercise. Researchers at The University of Nottingham's School of Biomedical Sciences found that recreational athletes who took a dietary supplement containing L-carnitine — a nutrient found in common food sources — combined with carbohydrates showed several metabolism benefits during low- and high-intensity exercise and improved exercise performance.

Health - Veterinary - 29.06.2011
Honey helps heal horses' wounds, researchers find
Honey helps heal horses’ wounds, researchers find
A simple application of honey to horses' leg wounds results in smaller wound sizes and faster healing time, University of Sydney researchers have found. Honey has been used to treat wounds in humans since ancient Egypt, but this study, using manuka honey from New Zealand, is the first time in the world a clinical trial has been conducted in horses.

Health - 28.06.2011
Researchers discover new airway stem cell
Researchers at UCLA have identified a new stem cell that participates in the repair of the lungs' large airways, which play a vital role in protecting the body from infectious agents and toxins in the environment. The airways protect the body by generating and clearing mucus, which is largely produced by the airways' specialized mucus glands.

Health - 28.06.2011
New airway stem cell
Researchers at UCLA have identified a new stem cell that participates in the repair of the lungs' large airways, which play a vital role in protecting the body from infectious agents and toxins in the environment. The airways protect the body by generating and clearing mucus, which is largely produced by the airways' specialized mucus glands.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2011
Biomedical Engineers Develop New Approach to Study Stem Cell Function
Cell Polarity and Chirality: Human endothelial cells on a micropatterned ring (inner diameter: 250 mm, width: 200 mm) stained for actin (red), tubulin (green), and nuclei (blue). Cells form a 'rightward' chiral alignment, while polarized by positioning their centrosomes (bright green) rather than cell nuclei closer to each boundary.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
Living antibiotic effective against Salmonella
Living antibiotic effective against Salmonella
Scientists have tested a predatory bacterium — Bdellovibrio — against Salmonella in the guts of live chickens. They found that it significantly reduced the numbers of Salmonella bacteria and, importantly, showed that Bdellovibrio are safe when ingested. The research, carried out by Professor Liz Sockett's team in the School of Biology at The University of Nottingham together with Robert Atterbury and Professor Paul Barrow in The University of Nottingham's School of Veterinary Medicine and Science was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

Health - Psychology - 27.06.2011
Premature babies risk mental health problems, say experts
Premature or low birthweight babies are more than three times more likely to suffer from anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence than full-term infants, according to psychologists at the University of Birmingham. Professor Stephen Wood, working with co-investigators at the University of Melbourne in Australia, conducted a meta-analysis of ten studies into mental health outcomes in children born prematurely.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
Team identifies new breast cancer tumor suppressor and how it works
Team identifies new breast cancer tumor suppressor and how it works
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers have identified a protein long known to regulate gene expression as a potent suppressor of breast cancer growth. Their study, in the journal Oncogene, is the first to demonstrate how this protein, known as Runx3, accomplishes this feat.  "People suggested that Runx3 might be a tumor suppressor in breast cancer because they found that it is down-regulated in a lot of breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tissues," said University of Illinois medical biochemistry professor Lin-Feng Chen, who led the study.

Economics / Business - Health - 27.06.2011
Kids' exposure to junk food ads unchanged despite regulations
Kids’ exposure to junk food ads unchanged despite regulations
Children's exposure to television advertising for unhealthy fast food has remained unchanged since the introduction of industry self-regulation, according to new research from the University of Sydney. The research, led by dietician Lana Hebden and published in the Medical Journal of Australia today, analysed all TV ads broadcast during a four-day sample period, in both May 2009 and April 2010.

Health - 26.06.2011
350 million adults have diabetes: study reveals the scale of global epidemic
A major international study collating and analysing worldwide data on diabetes since 1980 has found that the number of adults with the disease reached 347 million in 2008, more than double the number in 1980. The research, published today in The Lancet , reveals that the prevalence of diabetes has risen or at best remained unchanged in virtually every part of the world over the last three decades.