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Life Sciences - Health - 17.02.2011
Shining a light on trypanosome reproduction
Shining a light on trypanosome reproduction
Compelling visual evidence of sexual reproduction in African trypanosomes, single-celled parasites that cause major human and animal diseases, has been found by researchers from the University of Bristol. The research could eventually lead to new approaches for controlling sleeping sickness in humans and wasting diseases in livestock which are caused by trypanosomes carried by the bloodsucking tsetse fly.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2011
Research Provides First Evidence That the Skeleton Regulates Male Fertility
Department of Communications: Main phone: 212-305-3900 cumcnews [a] columbia (p) edu Alex Lyda P: 212-305-0820 mal2133 [a] columbia (p) edu Karin Eskenazi P: 212-342-0508 ket2116 [a] columbia (p) edu NEW YORK (February 17, 2011) - Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered that the skeleton acts as a regulator of fertility in male mice through a hormone released by bone, known as osteocalcin.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2011
The placebo effect: expecting the best, fearing the worst
The placebo effect: expecting the best, fearing the worst
Health 17 Feb 11 Poor expectations of treatment can override all the effect of a potent pain-relieving drug, a brain imaging study at Oxford University has shown. In contrast, positive expectations of treatment doubled the natural physiological or biochemical effect of the opioid drug among the healthy volunteers in the study.

Health - 16.02.2011
Local TV news promotes confusion, anxiety about cancer
Local TV news promotes confusion, anxiety about cancer
The more local TV news people watch, the more they feel powerless against cancer, according to a new study. These are among the findings of Jeff Niederdeppe, assistant professor of communication in Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Chul-Joo Lee of Ohio State University, in a new study published online by the journal Communication Research.

Health - 16.02.2011
Cancer's unusual suspects
Science | Health Jonathan Wood | 16 Feb 11 The standard treatment for acute myeloid leukaemia , the most common type of leukaemia in adults, is chemotherapy. But in some people the cancer of the white blood cells can come back after initially successful treatment. This is thought to be because some cancer stem cells - key cells able to drive the growth of cancers - have remained even after the chemotherapy.

Health - Economics / Business - 16.02.2011
Water softeners not found to improve childhood eczema
Water softeners not found to improve childhood eczema
PA 46/11 The first study of its kind in the world — involving 336 children aged between six months and 16 years old — has shown that installing a water softener for three months brings no additional relief for eczema sufferers. Up to one fifth of all children of school age have eczema, along with about one in 12 of the adult population.

Health - Chemistry - 15.02.2011
Computer Simulations Reveal the Structure and Dynamics of a Chemical Signal that Triggers Metastatic Cancer
San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) McCammon Lab UC San Diego University of Pavia, Italy National Institutes of Health Howard Hughes Medical Institute National Science Foundation UCSD-University of Pavia team say insights into the "packaging" of DNA could lead to new "epigenetic" drugs that block the spread of cancer cells February 08, 2011 By Warren Froelich Molecular Dynamics simulation shows that oxygen molecules reach the active site of Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 although substrate peptides (black, H3 histone tail & orange, SNAIL1 protein) are bound (Riccardo Baron et al.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.02.2011
Searching For the Soul of the Genome
The discovery that a "gene desert" on chromosome 9 was a hotspot for coronary artery disease (CAD) risk was among the highlights of findings produced recently by genome-wide association studies, which compare the genomes of many people for genetic variations and have been broadly used in the past few years to study hundreds of diseases and complex traits.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.02.2011
Active wound healing can accelerate tumour formation
Processes that are involved in active wound healing can lead to an increased risk for basal cell carcinoma in the skin. This is the conclusion of a recent study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet, published in the journal PNAS. The link between the development of basal cell cancers and wound healing was studied in mice with the same genetic changes that occur in human tumors.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.02.2011
Low Levels of Brain Protein May Lead to Alzheimer's
In Alzheimer's disease, short, toxic amyloid beta peptides build up inside the brain, erasing memories, altering behavior, and ultimately destroying lives. Scientists have a good idea how toxic amyloid beta is created, but what's not clear is why excessive amounts of amyloid beta accumulate in people who develop Alzheimer's.

Health - 14.02.2011
No link between Vitamin D levels and prostate cancer
No link between Vitamin D levels and prostate cancer
Vitamin D levels do not affect men's chances of developing prostate cancer, according to new research from the University of Bristol published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. In a detailed review, funded by Cancer Research UK, scientists looked at all the available evidence and found there was no link between the amount of vitamin D in men's blood and the risk of prostate cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2011
Detecting whether a heart attack has occurred
During about 30 percent of all heart attacks, the patient experiences no symptoms. However, unmistakable signs of the attack remain in the bloodstream for days. MIT researchers, working with Massachusetts General Hospital's Cardiovascular Research Center, have now designed a tiny implant that can detect those signs, which could help doctors more rapidly determine whether a patient has had a heart attack.

Sport - Health - 11.02.2011
Volunteers needed for weight loss study
Researchers at the University of Birmingham's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences are looking for volunteers to take part in a study investigating whether successful weight loss can alter perception. The study will test the effect of significant weight loss on an individual's perception of spatial layout and the built environment and is led by Guy Taylor, Doctoral Researcher for the Behavioural Medicine Group for the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences.

Health - Mathematics - 11.02.2011
Flu reduction policies don’t need to start at the beginning of an outbreak, study suggests
Flu reduction policies don’t need to start at the beginning of an outbreak, study suggests
Under embargo until 2200 hrs London time Thursday 10 February 2011 It might be better to implement policies to reduce the impact of a flu epidemic a few weeks after the start of an outbreak rather than straight away, according to a new study that uses mathematical models to simulate the effects of different interventions.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2011
Northern and southern Swedes are genetically different
People from northern and southern Sweden differ from each other genetically, according to the largest genetic study of the Swedish population yet. Swedes also have genetically more in common with Germans and British than with Finns. The study, performed jointly at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and University of Helsinki, has been published in PLoS ONE.

Health - Mathematics - 10.02.2011
Flu reduction policies don’t need to start at the beginning of an outbreak, study suggests
Flu reduction policies don’t need to start at the beginning of an outbreak, study suggests
Flu reduction policies don?t need to start at the beginning of an outbreak, study suggests Mathematical models predict that some policy interventions might not be best employed at the start of an epidemic. It might be better to implement policies to reduce the impact of a flu epidemic a few weeks after the start of an outbreak rather than straight away, according to a new study that uses mathematical models to simulate the effects of different interventions.

Health - 10.02.2011
Device delivers new way to treat cancer
Chemotherapy that has much-reduced side-effects could be a step closer, thanks to a development by University scientists. Researchers have created a tiny device that triggers reactions in cells. The technology could enable cancer drugs to be activated at the site of a tumour. Targeted treatment Targeting drug treatment where it is needed could safeguard the rest of the patient's body.

Administration - Health - 10.02.2011
Extra testosterone reduces your empathy
Extra testosterone reduces your empathy
A new study from Utrecht and Cambridge Universities has for the first time found that an administration of testosterone under the tongue in volunteers negatively affects a person's ability to 'mind read', an indication of empathy. In addition, the effects of testosterone administration are predicted by a fetal marker of prenatal testosterone, the 2D:4D ratio.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.02.2011
Look at your body to reduce pain
Look at your body to reduce pain
Simply looking at your body reduces pain, according to new research by scientists from UCL (University College London) and the University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. Published in the journal Psychological Science, the research shows that viewing your hand reduces the pain experienced when a hot object touches the skin.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.02.2011
Study suggests why HIV-uninfected babies born to mothers with HIV might be more vulnerable to infections
Study suggests why HIV-uninfected babies born to mothers with HIV might be more vulnerable to infections
Study suggests why HIV-uninfected babies born to mothers with HIV might be more vulnerable to infections Imperial research published in JAMA finds that babies of mothers with HIV have lower levels of several specific antibodies. Babies whose mothers have HIV, but who are not HIV-infected themselves, are born with lower levels of specific proteins in their blood called antibodies, which fight infection, compared with babies not exposed to HIV, a new study has found.