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Life Sciences - Health - 04.08.2010
Genome of ancient sponge reveals origins of first animals, cancer
Genome of ancient sponge reveals origins of first animals, cancer
BERKELEY — The sponge, which was not recognized as an animal until the 19th century, is now the simplest and most ancient group of animals to have their genome sequenced. In a paper appearing in the August 5 issue of the journal Nature , a team of researchers led by Daniel Rokhsar of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), report the draft genome sequence of the sea sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and several insights the genome gives into the origins of both the first animals and cancer.

Economics / Business - Health - 04.08.2010
Ovulating women unconsciously buy sexier clothing
Ovulating women unconsciously buy sexier clothing
Ovulating women unconsciously buy sexier clothes, says new research from the University of Minnesota. The study finds that ovulating women unconsciously dress to impress - doing so not to impress men, but to outdo rival women during the handful of days each month when they are ovulating. "The desire for women at peak fertility to unconsciously choose products that enhance appearance is driven by a desire to outdo attractive rival women," says Kristina Durante, a post-doctoral fellow at the Carlson School.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.08.2010
Biologists Discover MicroRNAs that Control Function of Blood Stem Cells
Biologists Discover MicroRNAs that Control Function of Blood Stem Cells
PASADENA, Calif.—Hematopoietic stem cells provide the body with a constant supply of blood cells, including the red blood cells that deliver oxygen and the white blood cells that make up the immune system. Hematopoietic—or blood—stem cells must also make more copies of themselves to ensure that they are present in adequate numbers to provide blood throughout a person's lifetime, which means they need to strike a delicate balance between self-renewal and development into mature blood-cell lineages.

Health - Environment - 03.08.2010
Carnivorous mice spread deadly plague in prairie dog towns
Carnivorous mice spread deadly plague in prairie dog towns
How can plague persist after it decimates entire colonies of prairie dogs? The answer, researchers say, is the flea-ridden, carnivorous rodent known as the grasshopper mouse. BY MARK SHWARTZ Prairie dogs, once abundant in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, have been decimated in recent decades by plague - a virulent bacterial disease spread by fleas.

Health - 03.08.2010
All-over tan is a myth, study finds
An even all-over tan may be unattainable as some body areas are more resistant to tanning than others, a study has found. Researchers at the University say the results explain why some holidaymakers find it so hard to achieve an even tan all over their body. The findings, published in the journal Experimental Dermatology, show that the buttock is much more resistant to sunshine.

Health - 03.08.2010
Solariums double skin cancer risk in young people
Scientists have confirmed what has long been feared - young people who use solariums have almost double the risk of being diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 40. The study, published in the latest edition of the International Journal of Cancer, was performed by a team of Australian researchers led by Dr Anne Cust of the School of Population Health at the University of Melbourne.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2010
Exercise, calorie restrictions can rejuvenate older synapses
Exercise, calorie restrictions can rejuvenate older synapses
Harvard researchers have uncovered a mechanism in mice through which caloric restriction and exercise delay some of the debilitating effects of aging by rejuvenating the connections between nerves and the muscles that they control. The research both members of the Center for Brain Science at Harvard and professors of molecular and cellular biology.

Health - 02.08.2010
Mind over matter The psychology of healing
Mind over matter The psychology of healing
PA 201/10 People suffering from diabetes-related foot ulcers show different rates of healing according to the way they cope and their psychological state of mind, according to new research by a health psychologist at The University of Nottingham. The large study published in the journal Diabetologia this month has shown that the way patients cope with the condition and their levels of depression, affect how the wound heals or worsens.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2010
Scientists Find Gas Pedal - And Brake - for Uncontrolled Cell Growth
Discoveries offer promising new way to treat wide array of diseases and conditions Aug. By Scott LaFee Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new way to regulate the uncontrolled growth of blood vessels, a major problem in a broad range of diseases and conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2010
Cancer-causing bacterium targets tumor-suppressor protein
University of Illinois medical biochemistry professor Lin-Feng Chen and graduate students Ying-Huang Nicole Tsang, middle, and Acacia Lamb discovered a mechanism directly linking a protein associated with H. pylori infection of the stomach and stomach cancer. CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori, the only known cancer-causing bacterium, disables a tumor suppressor protein in host cells.

Health - Economics / Business - 01.08.2010
Doctors hard to find for patients in Massachusetts’ first for-profit health plan
The first for-profit insurance company approved to offer government-subsidized coverage under Massachusetts' health reform has dangerously restricted access to primary care, say Harvard physicians. The physicians say their findings - reported in the New England Journal of Medicine - raise troubling concerns about the United States' new health care policy , which is modeled after the Massachusetts plan.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.08.2010
Exercise and Caloric Restriction Rejuvenate Synapses in Lab Mice
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Steve Bradt 617. Exercise and Caloric Restriction Rejuvenate Synapses in Lab Mice Finding may illuminate a reason for the beneficial effects of these regimens on aging Cambridge, Mass. Aug. Harvard University researchers have uncovered a mechanism through which caloric restriction and exercise delay some of the debilitating effects of aging by rejuvenating connections between nerves and the muscles that they control.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.08.2010
Epileptic seizures may be linked to an ancient gene family
Arthur Toga, University of California at Los Angeles via the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Artist's visualization of the human brain. Nerve cells in the brain are responsible for maintaining a threshold between 'rest' and excitement in response to stimuli. New research points to a genetic route to understanding and treating epilepsy.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.07.2010
Cell research reveals new twists in genetic diseases
AUSTIN, Texas — Mutations in a gene known as "Fritz" may be responsible for causing human genetic disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, University of Texas at Austin developmental biologist John Wallingford and Duke University human geneticist and cell biologist Nicholas Katsanis have found.

Health - Pedagogy - 29.07.2010
Wisconsin childern exposed to too much secondhand smoke, research shows
Media Inquiries news [a] uwhealth (p) org Follow Us Follow UW Health on Facebook Our Services Smoking Cessation MADISON - Wisconsin children are exposed to secondhand smoke at a rate 40 percent higher than the national average, according to research published in the July issue of Pediatrics. The study, conducted by researchers from the National Cancer Institute, found that 10.5 percent of Wisconsin children age 17 and younger are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke.

Health - 29.07.2010
UW scientists find sleep changes during migration make birds hyperactive
Media Inquiries news [a] uwhealth (p) org Related Information Department of Psychiatry For Patients Wisconsin Sleep Program Stay Connected Madison, Wisconsin - Birds in the wild can fly long distances on very little sleep during the spring and fall migrations, but they also become more impulsive. University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health researchers, writing in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience , found that during the migratory seasons, sparrows become much less able to resist temptation.

Health - Administration - 28.07.2010
Healthcare competition saves lives
Healthcare competition saves lives
Competition among hospitals saves patients? lives and decreases their overall length of stay in hospital, according to a new study involving researchers from the University of Bristol, who found there was no corresponding increase in overall expenditure. English NHS hospitals located in areas where patients have more choice had lower death rates and shorter patient stays than hospitals in less competitive areas.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.07.2010
Huntington disease discovery provides new hope for treatment
Huntington disease discovery provides new hope for treatment
Australian scientists have identified the behaviour of the mutant protein 'huntingtin' which leads to the fatal Huntington's disease providing potential targets to treat the disease, a University of Melbourne study reveals. Huntington's disease is a genetic disease with no cure, characterized by a steady decline in motor control and the dysfunction and death of brain cells.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.07.2010
Probing Question: Do boys or girls suffer more from poor body image?
Probing Question: Do boys or girls suffer more from poor body image?
By Melissa Beattie-Moss and A'ndrea Elyse Messer Research/Penn State Picture a crowded beach at the height of summer. Boys and girls of all shapes and sizes cavort in the waves and lounge on beach towels. It's the skin-baring season - and that can exacerbate body image woes for many teens. Who do you think is most unhappy with their bodies? Underweight or overweight? Girls or boys? If you guessed overweight girls, think again.

Health - Administration - 27.07.2010
Positive change in menopausal experience
AUSTIN, Texas — White women are becoming more optimistic about menopause, with many seeing it as an opportunity to rethink their lives and redefine themselves, a new University of Texas at Austin national study shows. This is just one of the positive changes in the way women across different ethnic groups are experiencing the change of life, the School of Nursing research found.