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Health - 24.05.2011
Nerve-stimulation treatment effective against epilepsy
Nerve-stimulation treatment effective against epilepsy
Medications are the mainstay of treatment for epilepsy, but for a considerable number of patients — estimated to be as many as 1 million in the U.S. — drugs don't work. These patients suffer from a type of epilepsy known as refractory or drug-resistant epilepsy, in which drugs can't control their seizures .

Electroengineering - Health - 24.05.2011
Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine
Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine A novel way to immobilise radioactive forms of iodine using a microwave, has been discovered by an expert at the University of Sheffield. Iodine radioisotopes are produced by fission of uranium fuel in a nuclear reactor. Radioactive iodine is of concern because it is highly mobile in the environment and selective uptake by the thyroid gland can pose a significant cancer risk following long term exposure.

Health - Law - 24.05.2011
Quality of nursing home care no protection against litigation
Providing high quality care in nursing homes does little to guard against risks of being sued, a new University of Melbourne study has found. The Melbourne Law School study found the risks of being sued differed only slightly between the highest and lowest quality nursing homes. Published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Relationship between Quality of Care and Negligence Litigation in Nursing Homes analysed negligence claims brought against 1465 nursing homes in the US between 1998 and 2006.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.05.2011
Improving Health Assessments with a Single Cell
Improving Health Assessments with a Single Cell
Caltech researchers develop quick, low-cost, and portable microchip for immune monitoring and clinical applications PASADENA, Calif.—There's a wealth of health information hiding in the human immune system. Accessing it, however, can be very challenging, as the many and complex roles that the immune system plays can mask the critical information that is relevant to addressing specific health issues.

Health - 23.05.2011
Paper produced to help travellers identify ticks
(a) Ambyomma hebreaum, the Bont tick (b) A. maculatum, the Gulf coast tick (c) A. americanum, the Lone star tick. (d) A. cajenennse (e) mouthparts and (f) position of anal groove. The first study recording all varieties of ticks found on travellers has been published. Travel and Disease Vector Ticks by Dr John McGarry from the School of Veterinary Science has been published in Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.05.2011
Scientists find new drug target in breast cancer
Scientists find new drug target in breast cancer
Researchers have identified a new protein involved in the development of drug resistance in breast cancer which could be a target for new treatments, they report today Medicine. In a mouse model of breast cancer, blocking production of the protein using genetic techniques caused tumours to shrink. The scientists are now looking for new drugs which could achieve a similar effect.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2011
Does Eating Give You Pleasure, or Make You Anxious?
New study reveals biological reasons for feelings of anxiety instead of reward in patients with anorexia May 19, 2011 By Debra Kain Perhaps the most puzzling symptom of anorexia nervosa - a disorder that tends to occur in young women - is the refusal to eat, resulting in extreme weight loss. While most people have a great deal of difficulty in dieting and losing weight, particularly if a diet extends over many months or years, individuals with anorexia nervosa can literally diet themselves to death.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.05.2011
Oxford academics recognised by Royal Society
The Royal Society has elected eight Oxford University academics as new Fellows. They are Professor Hagan Bayley, Professor Alan Grafen, Professor Ian Horrocks, Professor Alex Kacelnik, Professor Steffen Lauritzen, Professor David Manolopoulos, Professor Fiona Powrie and Professor Angela Vincent. Professor Hagan Bayley is Professor of Chemical Biology at the Department of Chemistry and a Fellow of Hertford College.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.05.2011
Crossing your arms relieves pain
Crossing your arms relieves pain
Crossing your arms reduces the intensity of pain you feel when receiving a painful stimulus on the hand, according to research by scientists at UCL. Published in the current issue of the journal PAIN, the research shows that crossing your arms over the midline (an imaginary line running vertically down the centre of the body) confuses the brain and reduces the intensity of the pain sensation.

Health - 20.05.2011
Major analysis shows value of non-physician clinicians for maternal health in sub-Saharan Africa
Major analysis shows value of non-physician clinicians for maternal health in sub-Saharan Africa
Mothers in developing countries who give birth by caesarean section are at no significant extra risk from having the procedure carried out by non-physician clinicians, or 'clinical officers', according to major new research from the University of Birmingham published in the British Medical Journal (Friday May 20).

Health - 19.05.2011
Podcast for International Clinical Trials Day
A Research Associate in the Department of Biostatistics has produced a podcast for the International Clinical Trials Day on behalf of the Cochrane Collaboration. Produced by Dr Kerry Dwan of the MRC North West Hub for Trials Methodology Research, which is based in the Department, the podcast is based on the Cochrane Methodology Review Comparison of protocols and registry entries to published reports for randomised controlled trials.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.05.2011
Computer game helps eye specialists treat disease in children
Computer game helps eye specialists treat disease in children
An eye consultant has drawn on his teenage passion for computer programming to create a special test to check the vision of children as young as four, in a way that can flag up problems caused by glaucoma, drug side-effects, brain tumours and other conditions. Mr Tariq Aslam, a consultant at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital and senior lecturer at The University of Manchester, found that it was very difficult getting children to sit still and concentrate while machines designed for adults measured what they could see at the edge of their vision.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.05.2011
Liquid crystal droplets discovered to be exquisitely sensitive to an important bacterial lipid
In the computer displays of medical equipment in hospitals and clinics, liquid crystal technologies have already found a major role. But a discovery reported from the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests that micrometer-sized droplets of liquid crystal, which have been found to change their ordering and optical appearance in response to the presence of very low concentrations of a particular bacterial lipid, might find new uses in a range of biological contexts.

Health - Administration - 19.05.2011
Cell therapy aims to prevent transplant rejection
Cell therapy aims to prevent transplant rejection
A cell therapy that could prevent transplanted organs being rejected, and remove the need for prolonged use of immunosuppressant drugs, has shown promise in early-stage studies in mice. The approach would involve transplant patients being re-injected with their own immune cells after the cells have been isolated from a blood sample.

Health - 19.05.2011
Cell therapy to prevent organ rejection
Researchers at King's College London have used cells found naturally in the body, to re-educate the immune system to prevent rejection of an organ transplant while remaining capable of fighting infections and cancer. Currently, patients must take immunosuppressant drugs to prevent a new organ from being rejected after transplantation.

Health - 18.05.2011
Enlarged prostate: decade-long study demonstrates immediate and long-term benefits of holmium laser treatment
New research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Urology Association (AUA) in Washington, DC demonstrates that holmium laser therapy is a safe and durable treatment option for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - an enlargement of the prostate that affects most men as they age. The study, conducted by researchers from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), is the longest comprehensive assessment of this technology to date, and researchers suggest it may now safely be considered the new, size independent, gold standard for treatment of BPH.

Health - Economics / Business - 18.05.2011
Defence Estate study
Defence Estate study
The HERO Review by the Centre for Defence Studies, King's College London, for Morgan Sindall Group plc proposes more effective MoD partnering with local authorities and the private sector, new approaches to home ownership and separation of MOD operational and support responsibilities. The Centre for Defence Studies, King's College London today published an independent report into the operation and management of the UK's Defence Estate.

Health - 18.05.2011
Patients help highlight 'serious' side effects of drugs
Patients help highlight ’serious’ side effects of drugs
PA 160/10 New research has shown that patient reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is richer in detail and better at describing the impact on their daily lives than information provided by health care professionals.

Health - 17.05.2011
Medical devices under scrutiny
Medical devices under scrutiny
Health Jonathan Wood | 17 May 11 'When Suzanne Ludgate of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the government regulator of medical devices in the UK, says she was "appalled at how many devices are brought to market with a lack of appropriate clinical data," you know there must be a problem.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2011
'Octopus' provides cancer breakthrough
’Octopus’ provides cancer breakthrough
Researchers at King's have achieved a breakthrough in understanding a biological process which causes many common cancers, including lung and breast cancer. The achievement opens up new possibilities for the development of improved cancer drugs. The findings are published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.