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Life Sciences - Health - 15.03.2010
How muscle cells control fatty acid uptake
[Press Relese 2010-03-15] A new study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet shows that the blood vessels and muscles of the heart can regulate the uptake of fatty acids that we ingest through meat, milk products and other food. The researchers behind the study have also identified the way in which regulation is governed by the muscles themselves.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.03.2010
Changing lifestyle remains first option for preventing diabetes
Changing lifestyle remains first option for preventing diabetes
The findings of the study, jointly led by Oxford University and Duke University Medical Center, have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with a presentation at the American College of Cardiology annual conference. The research team found that a drug used for treating high blood pressure modestly reduced progression to diabetes in these patients but had no effect on cardiovascular health, while a drug for controlling blood sugar levels had no effect on either the development of diabetes or heart problems.

Health - 11.03.2010
Variability as well as high blood pressure holds high risk of stroke
Variability as well as high blood pressure holds high risk of stroke
Three papers published at the same time in The Lancet, and a further study in The Lancet Neurology, show that it is variability in patients' blood pressure that predicts the risk of a stroke most powerfully and not a high average or usual blood pressure level. The results of the studies, led by Professor Peter Rothwell and colleagues at the University of Oxford, have major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure in prevention of stroke and heart disease.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.03.2010
Obesity like alcohol increases the risk of liver disease
Obesity like alcohol increases the risk of liver disease
Obesity and alcohol both increase the risk of liver disease, researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Glasgow show in two separate studies published in the British Medical Journal. While alcohol is well known as a major cause of liver cirrhosis, recent evidence suggests that excess body weight may also play a role.

Health - Veterinary - 11.03.2010
New evidence-based resource for vets in clinical practice
New evidence-based resource for vets in clinical practice
PA 47/10 It will cost £3.5m and take 10 years, but once established the new Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine (CEVM) will be the very first initiative that integrates the most up to date, accurate and relevant evidence with clinical decision making in the veterinary profession. Hosted by The University of Nottingham and partly funded by Novartis Animal Health, the new Centre aims to develop and promote the principles of evidence-based veterinary medicine in all aspects of the veterinary profession.

Health - 11.03.2010
Variability as well as high blood pressure holds high risk of stroke
Three papers published at the same time in The Lancet, and a further study in The Lancet Neurology, show that it is variability in patients' blood pressure that predicts the risk of a stroke most powerfully and not a high average or usual blood pressure level. The results of the studies, led by Professor Peter Rothwell and colleagues at the University of Oxford, have major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure in prevention of stroke and heart disease.

Health - 11.03.2010
New drug candidate reduces blood lipids
A thyroid-hormone-like substance that works specifically on the liver reduces blood cholesterol with no serious side effects. This according to a clinical trial conducted by researchers from Karolinska Institutet, amongst other centres, published today in the top-ranking scientific periodical The New England Journal of Medicine.

Health - 10.03.2010
Study gives sense of how animals bond
The study, published in the journal Nature, suggests that when the hormone fails to function, animals are unable to recognise other individuals from their scent. Researchers, including scientists in Germany and Japan, reached their conclusion by studying the way rats familiarise themselves with other rats through smell.

Health - 09.03.2010
Perceived health can predict survival of esophago-gastric cancer
Changes in patients' self-rated quality of life after treatment for esophago-gastric cancer can predict the chances for long-term survival. This is the result researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet made, in a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The patient's self-rated quality of life, provide indications of whether he or she will survive.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.03.2010
Protein Shown to be Natural Inhibitor of Aging in Fruit Fly Model
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have identified a protein called Sestrin that serves as a natural inhibitor of aging and age-related pathologies in fruit flies.  They also showed that Sestrin, whose structure and biochemical function are conserved between flies and humans, is needed for regulation of a signaling pathway that is the central controller of aging and metabolism.

Health - Social Sciences - 05.03.2010
Pay It Forward Pays Off
This diagram illustrates how a single act of kindness can spread between individuals and across time. Cooperative behavior spreads three degrees of separation: if Eleni increases her contribution to the public good, it benefits Lucas (one degree of separation), who gives more when paired with Erika (two degrees of separation) in period 2, who gives more when paired with Jay (three degrees of separation) in period 3, who gives more when paired with Brecken in period 4.

Health - Administration - 04.03.2010
Women's support groups improve newborn survival rates
Women’s support groups improve newborn survival rates
Women's community groups have had a dramatic effect on reducing neonatal mortality rates in some of the poorest areas on India, according to new UCL research. The study, published today in The Lancet , reports that the groups provide a cost-effective intervention with added benefits such as reducing significantly maternal depression and improving decision-making amongst the women.

Health - Administration - 03.03.2010
Project set to improve communication of stroke survivors
Stroke survivors in South Yorkshire are set to benefit from a unique project being launched by the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, which will aim to improve their communication skills. The CACTUS Project will assess whether people can improve their communication skills, regardless of the time since their stroke.

Health - 03.03.2010
Acupuncture May Relieve Joint Pain Caused by Some Breast Cancer Treatments
Contact: Elizabeth Streich eas2125 [a] columbia (p) edu (212) 305-3900 Gloria Chin glc9010 [a] nyp (p) org 212-305-5587 Acupuncture May Relieve Joint Pain Caused by Some Breast Cancer Treatments Joint Pain, Stiffness Common Side Effect of Routine Therapy NEW YORK (March 4, 2010) - A new study, led by researchers at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, demonstrates tha

Life Sciences - Health - 03.03.2010
How the demons of dementia possess and damage brain cells
How the demons of dementia possess and damage brain cells
Alzheimer's disease currently affects more than 26 million people worldwide and estimates of up to four times as many sufferers by 2050 has made studying its causes a top priority for neuroscientists.

Health - Administration - 03.03.2010
Combination of Herceptin, Tykerb effective against certain gastric cancers, study finds
A combination of two targeted therapies already shown to be effective in breast cancer has been found to pack an effective one-two punch against a subset of gastric cancers with a specific genetic mutation, according to a study by UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The drugs Herceptin and Tykerb, when given together, proved to significantly inhibit tumor growth in gastric cancers with amplified levels of HER2, a mutation that results in an aggressive form of the disease, causing the cancers to grow and spread faster.

Health - Psychology - 02.03.2010
Moderate drinking before trauma leads to more flashbacks
Moderate drinking before trauma leads to more flashbacks
People who have drunk a moderate amount of alcohol before a traumatic event report more flashbacks than those who have had no alcohol, according to new UCL research. The results may give new insight into why some individuals develop post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a traumatic event and others do not.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.03.2010
HIV vaccine strategy expands immune responses
HIV vaccine strategy expands immune responses
Two teams of researchers have announced an HIV vaccination strategy that has been shown to expand the breadth and depth of immune responses in rhesus monkeys. Mosaic vaccines show promise in reducing the spread of deadly virus LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 3, 2010—Two teams of researchers—including Los Alamos National Laboratory theoretical biologists Bette Korber, Will Fischer, Sydeaka Watson, and James Szinger—have announced an HIV vaccination strategy that has been shown to expand the breadth and depth of immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

Health - Economics / Business - 01.03.2010
Global child health and tuberculosis goals are being missed?
Global child health and tuberculosis goals are being missed?
Health | Society 02 Mar 10 Lesotho has experienced a 25 per cent rise in infant death rates over the past several decades and continues to have one of the highest rates of HIV in the world, with about one in five persons infected. Problems controlling common diseases like HIV, heart disease and diabetes in poor countries could be hindering efforts to meet the world's key child health and tuberculosis goals, a new study published in PLoS Medicine has warned.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.03.2010
HGP is 10: Where are we now?
HGP is 10: Where are we now?
Science | Health Jonathan Wood ] we'll be running a series of articles to celebrate. In this post we look back at how far genome research has come in the last decade... 'It's hard to think back and remember how we worked then. We were scrabbling around in the dark,' says Professor Mark McCarthy of the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism [ OCDEM ], recalling how research on the genetic causes of disease had to be carried out before the human genome was sequenced.