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Health - Life Sciences - 24.06.2010
Parkinson's patients risky behaviour explained
Parkinson’s patients risky behaviour explained
Scientists at UCL have explained Parkinson's patients' risky behaviour, a rare side effect of standard treatments for the disease. The finding has implications for future medication of patients. The standard treatments for Parkinson's disease, which work by increasing dopamine signalling in the brain, can trigger highly risky behaviours, known as 'impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviours? (ICBs) in approximately 5-10% of patients.

Health - Environment - 24.06.2010
New Study Links One in Five Deaths in Bangladesh to Arsenic in the Drinking Water
' Environmental Health ' Research & Service ' New Study Links One in Five Deaths in Bangladesh to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Increased Mortality is Linked to Chronic Diseases with a 70 percent increased mortality risk among those with the highest level of exposure Between 33 and 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to arsenic in the drinking water'a catastrophe that the World Health Organization has called 'the largest mass poisoning in history.

Health - Chemistry - 24.06.2010
Chemists find an easier way to synthesize new drug candidates
Chemists find an easier way to synthesize new drug candidates
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Some drugs may be more effective the longer they last inside the body. To prevent such drugs from being broken down too rapidly, pharmaceutical manufacturers often attach a fluorine-containing structure called a trifluoromethyl group. However, the processes now used require harsh reaction conditions or only work in a small number of cases, limiting their usefulness for synthesizing new drug candidates for testing.

Psychology - Health - 24.06.2010
Study: Moms’ favoritism tied to depression in adulthood
Whether mom's golden child or her black sheep, siblings who sense that their mother consistently favors or rejects one child over others are more likely to show depressive symptoms as middle-aged adults, finds a new study by Cornell gerontologist Karl Pillemer.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2010
HGP is 10: more than just genes
HGP is 10: more than just genes
In the last of a series of articles marking the 10th anniversary of the first draft human genome, OxSciBlog talks to Professor George Ebers about what we know now about the genetics involved in multiple sclerosis. Since the sequencing of the human genome, our understanding has greatly increased of the subtle interplay between our genes, our lifestyles, and all that we encounter and are exposed to as we grow up and develop.

Health - 24.06.2010
Polio research gives new insight into tackling vaccine-derived poliovirus
Polio research gives new insight into tackling vaccine-derived poliovirus
Polio research gives new insight into tackling vaccine-derived poliovirus Research shows virus can be tackled with an existing vaccine A vaccine-derived strain of poliovirus that has spread in recent years is serious but it can be tackled with an existing vaccine, according to a new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Health - Computer Science - 23.06.2010
No link between early childhood cancers and living near mobile phone base station during pregnancy, says study
No link between early childhood cancers and living near mobile phone base station during pregnancy, says study
No link between early childhood cancers and living near mobile phone base station during pregnancy, says study A new study finds no association between a mother living near to a mobile phone base station during her pregnancy and the risk of that child developing cancer before reaching the age of five - News A new study looking at the patterns of early childhood cancers across Great Britain has found no association between a mother living near to a mobile phone base station during her pregnancy and the risk of that child developing cancer before reaching the age of five.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2010
Exposure to flame retardants linked to changes in thyroid hormones
Exposure to flame retardants linked to changes in thyroid hormones
BERKELEY — Pregnant women with higher blood levels of a common flame retardant had altered thyroid hormone levels, a result that could have implications for fetal health, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. "This is the first study with a sufficient sample size to evaluate the association between PBDE flame retardants and thyroid function in pregnant women," said the study’s lead author, Jonathan Chevrier, a UC Berkeley researcher in epidemiology and in environmental health sciences.

Health - Pedagogy - 21.06.2010
Aussie school kids happy to grow and cook new foods, study reveals.
The University of Melbourne and Deakin University have released a research report evaluating the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program and confirmed that it has created positive health behaviour change in primary school children. The study was carried out over two years assessing 770 children's change in attitude, behaviour and knowledge of food.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2010
UCL researching light therapy as a potential treatment for epilepsy
UCL researching light therapy as a potential treatment for epilepsy
A new clinical trial at UCL is investigating whether light therapy could benefit people with epilepsy who continue to have seizures after trying several types of medication. The research, which is being carried out at the UCL Institute of Neurology and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, is being funded by children's health charity Action Medical Research.

Health - 17.06.2010
Parasite study offers human insight
Scientists studying the parasite, which is spread by the tsetse fly and infects the blood of people and animals, have shed light on how it is able to survive when taken up by a feeding fly. Sleeping sickness is a potentially fatal condition which affects up to 70,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa, and millions more are at risk from the disease.

Health - 17.06.2010
Parasite study offers human insight
Scientists studying the parasite, which is spread by the tsetse fly and infects the blood of people and animals, have shed light on how it is able to survive when taken up by a feeding fly. Sleeping sickness is a potentially fatal condition which affects up to 70,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa, and millions more are at risk from the disease.

Health - 17.06.2010
Key NHS IT Programmes UCL report
Key NHS IT Programmes UCL report
The Summary Care Record (SCR) and HealthSpace technologies, introduced in the NHS as part of the National Programme for IT (NPfIT), have so far demonstrated only modest benefits according to the final report of a three-year independent evaluation carried out by UCL researchers. The report's publication coincides with the publication of a research paper based on the findings in the British Medical Journal .

Health - 17.06.2010
Researchers unzip symptoms of the ‘male menopause’
Scientists have for the first time identified the symptoms associated with what has been termed late-onset hypogonadism or 'male menopause' caused by a reduction in testosterone production in ageing men. But the researchers say that unlike the female menopause, which affects all women, the male menopause is relatively rare, affecting only 2% of elderly men, and is often linked to poor general health and obesity.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.06.2010
New research shows malaria threat is as old as humanity
New research shows malaria threat is as old as humanity
New research shows malaria threat is as old as humanity New research shows that malaria is tens of thousands of years older than previously thought Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council News Release Embargoed until: Thursday 17 June 2010 1700 BST/1200 US eastern New research published today (17 June) by scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) shows that malaria is tens of thousands of years older than previously thought.

Health - 16.06.2010
Adding Nucleic Acid Testing to HIV Screening May Help Identify More People with HIV
Patients willing to use automated systems to retrieve results June 15, 2010 By Debra Kain Community-based HIV testing programs generally use only HIV antibody testing, but nucleic acid testing (NAT) can detect the presence of HIV earlier. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine studied more than 3,000 patients who sought HIV testing in community-based clinics in or near San Diego to examine the yield of testing with a rapid test plus NAT and to see whether patients would be willing to access their results by phone or computer.

Health - 16.06.2010
No solid evidence for giving heart attack patients oxygen
No solid evidence for giving heart attack patients oxygen
There is a lack of good evidence to support the standard practice of giving oxygen to people who've had a heart attack, say researchers from the UK and Spain in a new systematic review published in the Cochrane Library. Until further research is carried out, the team - including researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Surrey and Birmingham - says the possibility that giving oxygen may actually increase a patient's risk of dying cannot be ruled out.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.06.2010
Sheffield graduate's 'buckyball' listed in top 10 discoveries
Sheffield graduate's 'buckyball' listed in top 10 discoveries
Nobel Prize-winning research, carried out by University of Sheffield alumnus Professor Sir Harry Kroto, has been named by fellow academics as one of the ten most important discoveries made by their peers at UK universities in the past 60 years. A poll of UK academics placed Professor Kroto's 1985 discovery of the microscopic "footballs", known as buckyballs, tenth in a list topped by the discovery of DNA.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.06.2010
Findings provide new therapeutic route for rare kidney disease
Findings provide new therapeutic route for rare kidney disease
Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered the mechanisms of a protein known to play an active part in the inherited kidney disorder, Dent’s disease. Dent's disease is an extremely rare illness caused by a genetic mutation on the X chromosome. Affecting mostly men, its main symptom is kidney stones often followed by a deterioration of kidney function and in many cases chronic kidney failure.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.06.2010
Genetic clues to testicular cancer
Genetic clues to testicular cancer
The findings, published online today in Nature Genetics , come during the Everyman Male Cancer Awareness Month, which aims to increase awareness and funding for vital research into testicular and prostate cancers. The work, led by researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), was carried out in collaboration with colleagues at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and the Cancer Research UK Genetic Epidemiology Units in Cambridge and at the University of Leeds.