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Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Llama 'nanobodies' could hold key to preventing deadly post-transplant infection
Llama ’nanobodies’ could hold key to preventing deadly post-transplant infection
Scientists have developed a 'nanobody' - a small fragment of a llama antibody - that is capable of chasing out human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as it hides away from the immune system. This then enables immune cells to seek out and destroy this potentially deadly virus. Our team has shown that nanobodies derived from llamas have the potential to outwit human cytomegalovirus Ian Groves Around four out of five people in the UK are thought to be infected with HCMV, and in developing countries this can be as high as 95%.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Antibiotics may help to treat melanoma
Antibiotics may help to treat melanoma
Some antibiotics appear to be effective against a form of skin cancer known as melanoma. KU Leuven researchers examined the effect of these antibiotics on patient-derived tumours in mice. Some antibiotics appear to be effective against a form of skin cancer known as melanoma. KU Leuven researchers examined the effect of these antibiotics on patient-derived tumours in mice.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.07.2021
'An entourage effect': new clues on how low-dose CBD products work
’An entourage effect’: new clues on how low-dose CBD products work
Research from the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics shows that hemp extracts deliver high concentrations of cannabinoid acids in mice due to a 'pharmacokinetic entourage' mechanism. Pharmacologists at the University of Sydney have found tantalising clues as to why low-dose CBD products containing a full-spectrum of cannabinoids seem to have therapeutic impacts at relatively low doses.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Clinical trial of Alzheimer’s drug developed at UCL begins
A clinical trial of a new drug candidate for Alzheimer's disease which has been developed at UCL in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai has begun at UCLH with participants now being screened. Participants in the trial, conducted at the UCLH Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (NIHR UCLH Clinical Research Facility), will have the rare inherited form of Alzheimer's disease.

Health - 21.07.2021
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Researchers from the UNIGE and the HUG have used information theory for the first time to monitor in vivo the development of resistance mechanisms to a cancer-targeted therapy. One of the major challenges in modern cancer therapy is the adaptive response of cancer cells to targeted therapies: initially, these therapies are very often effective, then adaptive resistance occurs, allowing the tumor cells to proliferate again.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.07.2021
DNA regulator offers new hope for Hodgkin lymphoma treatment
DNA regulator offers new hope for Hodgkin lymphoma treatment
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered how a DNA-binding protein sustains Hodgkin lymphoma. The world-first discovery has the potential to help treat the rare cancer with the development of therapeutics that target cells once they become cancerous. The findings are published in EMBO Reports .

Health - 20.07.2021
New study raises prospect of ’fine-tuning’ immune response through individual T-cells
Scientists at Cardiff University have uncovered a way of "fine-tuning" the body's immune response to viral infections at the level of individual T-cells. T-cells play a crucial role in how the body responds to infection - and have become a key focus for scientists during the COVID-19 pandemic as they hunt for ways to kill the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.07.2021
’Springing forward’ affects early birds less than night owls
Every spring, the Daylight Saving Time shift robs people of an hour of sleep-and a new study shows that DNA plays a role in how much the "spring forward” time change affects individuals. People whose genetic profile makes them more likely to be "early birds” the rest of the year can adjust to the time change in a few days, the study shows.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.07.2021
New 3D images of shark intestines show they function like Nikola Tesla's valve
New 3D images of shark intestines show they function like Nikola Tesla’s valve
Contrary to what popular media portrays, we actually don't know much about what sharks eat. Even less is known about how they digest their food, and the role they play in the larger ocean ecosystem. For more than a century, researchers have relied on flat sketches of sharks' digestive systems to discern how they function - and how what they eat and excrete impacts other species in the ocean.

Health - 20.07.2021
Immune cells that drive gastrointestinal disease in babies
A Yale-led research team has identified the immune cells that drive the inflammation observed in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC),a severe gastrointestinal complication that often affects infants born prematurely.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Cancer development is influenced by tissue type
Why identical mutations cause different types of cancer Why do alterations of certain genes cause cancer only in specific organs of the human body? Scientists have now demonstrated that cells originating from different organs are differentially susceptible to activating mutations in cancer drivers: The same mutation in precursor cells of the pancreas or the bile duct leads to fundamental different outcomes.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
A team of researchers from the Institute for Infectious Diseases (IFIK) at the University of Bern and the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) have used a unique collection of advanced cell culture models of cells lining the airways from various domesticated and wildlife animals to determine which animals are susceptibly to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.07.2021
Biological 'fingerprints' of long COVID in blood could lead to diagnostic test, say Cambridge scientists
Biological ’fingerprints’ of long COVID in blood could lead to diagnostic test, say Cambridge scientists
Markers in our blood - 'fingerprints' of infection - could help identify individuals who have been infected by SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, several months after infection even if the individual had only mild symptoms or showed no symptoms at all, say Cambridge researchers. Because we currently have no reliable way of diagnosing long COVID, the uncertainty can cause added stress to people who are experiencing potential symptoms.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
RNA modification may protect against liver disease, explain liver fat differences between sexes
FINDINGS A chemical modification that occurs in some RNA molecules as they carry genetic instructions from DNA to cells' protein-making machinery may offer protection against non-alcoholic fatty liver, a condition that results from a build-up of fat in the liver and can lead to advanced liver disease, according to a new study by UCLA researchers.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.07.2021
Study highlights more effective and safe way to deliver chemotherapy
A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in The Lancet, has compared the three main ways anticancer treatment is given to patients when administered via a central vein. Hickman-type tunnelled catheters (Hickman), peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), and totally implanted ports (PORTs) are used to deliver systemic anticancer treatment (SACT) via a central vein.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
Blood pressure variability associated with increased risk of dementia, especially in men
Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association , the findings may identify people at increased risk of major cognitive impairment, allowing for triage into heightened surveillance, and point the way to new areas for research. The new paper is one of many important health findings yielded from the ASPREE (ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly) dataset.

Health - 16.07.2021
Wealthy, educated and urban women more prone to being overweight
Wealthy, educated and urban women more prone to being overweight
An international study of 55 countries has shown a marked increase in the number of overweight women globally, with wealthy, educated and urban women heavier than their counterparts. PhD candidate Md. Mehedi Hasan from The University of Queensland's Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) said the number of overweight women increased in 50 countries in 1990 to 2018, while the number of underweight women fell in 35.

Health - 16.07.2021
People with five or more symptoms in first week of infection more likely to develop long COVID
The presence of more than five symptoms of COVID-19 in the first week of infection is significantly associated with the development of long COVID, irrespective of age or gender, according to a new University of Birmingham-led review. The review by the University of Birmingham-led the Therapies for Long COVID (TLC) Study Group , published today in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , summarises current research on symptom prevalence, complications and management of long COVID.

Sport - Health - 16.07.2021
Study challenges overheating risk for pregnant women exercising in the heat
Study challenges overheating risk for pregnant women exercising in the heat
Pregnant women are at no greater risk of dangerous 'overheating' when exercising in hot weather compared to non-pregnant women, according to a world-first Australian study. The findings question recommendations discouraging exercise in hot weather due to the potential risk to the unborn child associated with 'overheating' or maternal hyperthermia, defined as a rise in core body temperature above 39C or 102F.

Health - Psychology - 16.07.2021
Share of people in Wales experiencing severe mental health issues more than doubled during pandemic, report finds
COVID-19 has exacerbated existing mental health inequalities for people in Wales, according to a new report from Cardiff University. The analysis, conducted by academics at the Wales Governance Centre, reveals the share of people experiencing severe mental health issues increased from 11.7% during the period immediately before the pandemic to 28.1% by April 2020.