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Health - 09.10.2021
Pandemic linked to rising rates of depressive and anxiety disorders
Pandemic linked to rising rates of depressive and anxiety disorders
Cases of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders have increased by more than 25 per cent worldwide, according to a world-first study of the impact of COVID-19 on mental health. The research, led by researchers from The University of Queensland's School of Public Health , Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research and Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (University of Washington) estimated people living in countries severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic have been most affected, especially women and younger people.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.10.2021
Alzheimer’s and Covid-19 share a genetic risk factor
A gene that impacts the risk of both Alzheimer's disease and severe Covid-19 has been identified by a UCL-led research team. The researchers estimate that one genetic variant of the OAS1 gene increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease by about 3-6% in the population as a whole, while related variants on the same gene increase the likelihood of severe Covid-19 outcomes.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.10.2021
Promising Results for Parkinson’s Disease Treatment
Carnegie Mellon University New protocols extend therapeutic benefits of deep brain stimulation Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have found a way to make deep brain stimulation (DBS) more precise, resulting in therapeutic effects that outlast what is currently available. The work, led by Aryn Gittis and colleagues in CMU's Gittis Lab , will significantly advance the study of Parkinson's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2021
Potential benefits of peanut consumption in young and healthy people
Potential benefits of peanut consumption in young and healthy people
A study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition provides new knowledge on the health effects of a diet rich in nuts. According to the study, focused on the consumption of peanuts, the daily intake of products from this nut could have beneficial effects on the cognitive function and stress response in young and healthy individuals.

Health - Environment - 07.10.2021
First Link between Stillbirths, Birth Complications and Excessive Heat in Lower-income Countries
Researchers call for improvements in early-warning systems Scientists at UC San Diego and colleagues have found links between extreme heat and a heightened incidence of stillbirths and preterm births in relatively poor countries. The study , published Oct. 6 in the journal Environment International , is believed to be the first to link the two phenomena in a global context.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.10.2021
Small molecules with a dual function
Small molecules with a dual function
How a small RNA and a small protein regulate the metabolism of cholera bacteria and the production of the cholera toxin The human gut is a multi-species habitat that can control our health and well-being. Bacteria, viruses and microbial fungi are part of this complex microbial community and help us with our digestion and immune defense.

Health - Physics - 07.10.2021
Smart slides help detect cancer
Smart slides help detect cancer
Australian researchers have created 'smart' microscope slides that can detect breast cancer cells. The innovative tech, NanoMSlide modifies microscope slides at the nanoscale and has been developed by researchers at La Trobe University. Now the team and their partners, including researchers from ANU, have proved it works, with their new study showing how the slides use striking colour contrasts to instantly detect disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2021
Signs of Alzheimer’s disease may be detectable before significant symptoms are obvious
Healthy people with a higher genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease may show differences in brain structure and in cognitive test scores relating to reasoning and attention, according to a new study. The University of Glasgow research - published today - suggests that, although the association between these differences in people with a higher genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease were small, the link suggests signs of the devastating disease may be detectable before significant symptoms are obvious.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2021
Financial rewards lead to higher vaccination uptake
Modest financial rewards can help increase COVID-19 vaccination rates. This is the conclusion of an international study co-lead by Swiss universities, based on data from Sweden. Despite countless appeals from politicians and scientists, stagnating vaccination rates hamper the containment of coronavirus.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2021
Potential cognitive benefits of major Alzheimer's risk gene
Potential cognitive benefits of major Alzheimer’s risk gene
A well-known gene that increases Alzheimer's risk, called APOE4, has now been linked with better visual working memory in older adults, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Joint senior author Professor Jonathan Schott (Dementia Research Centre, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) said: "We have long known that possession of an APOE4 risk gene increases risk for Alzheimer's disease, but the exact mechanism by which it does so remains uncertain.

Health - Social Sciences - 06.10.2021
Simple, low cost tests could help China’s battle to identify COPD sufferers
Researchers working with primary care patients in China have discovered that a simple questionnaire and airflow measurement test could identify adults suffering with undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) reveals.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.10.2021
Implantable tech could be a game-changer for heart patients
Implantable heart technology is being used in Manchester to assess when a patient is at high risk of dying, thanks to University of Manchester and Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust -led research. The implantable pacemakers and defibrillators contain multiple sensors that allow continuous monitoring of a patient's heart health, 24 hours a day.

Social Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
The practice of mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioural and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Study maps major circuit in the mouse brain
A UCLA study using mice reveals new insights into the wiring of a major circuit in the brain that is attacked by Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The findings could hone scientists' understanding of how diseases arise in the human brain and pinpoint new targets for treatment. Published today in Nature, the research is part of a package of 17 articles by the BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.10.2021
Cell 'Fingerprinting' Could Yield Long-Awaited Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic
Cell ’Fingerprinting’ Could Yield Long-Awaited Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic
New process combining infrared light and machine learning shows potential to break barriers in disease detection A  technology developed by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ÜBerkeley Lab) shows great promise for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease before symptoms arise, potentially changing the course of research and treatment for this condition, which affects millions of people worldwide and is estimated to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.10.2021
KU Leuven develops very potent antiviral against dengue
KU Leuven develops very potent antiviral against dengue
Researchers at the KU Leuven Rega Institute and CD3 have developed an ultrapotent inhibitor of the dengue virus, which causes the tropical disease known as dengue.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
Bacteria in the human gut go to war in order to protect themselves against attacks of the "spear-wielding" cholera bacterium Vibrio cholerae or other pathogens, an EPFL study has found. Image: V. cholerae's growth and competition on natural surfaces (left). The framed area is zoomed-in on the right and shows the killing of a bacterium (indicated by the red arrow) by the two V. cholerae cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.10.2021
Video games can have similar health benefits to jogging
Video games can have similar health benefits to jogging
Active video games could be a motivating way for Type 1 diabetics to keep active and help manage their condition. Last updated on Wednesday 6 October 2021 Active video games have similar positive health effects on the body as traditional exercises, such as jogging on a treadmill, according to a new study.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Neuroscientists roll out first comprehensive atlas of brain cells
Brain slice from a transgenic mouse, in which genetically defined neurons in the cerebral cortex are labeled with a red fluorescent reporter gene. (Image by Tanya Daigle, courtesy of the Allen Institute) When you clicked to read this story, a band of cells across the top of your brain sent signals down your spine and out to your hand to tell the muscles in your index finger to press down with just the right amount of pressure to activate your mouse or track pad.

Health - 05.10.2021
One in seven patients miss cancer surgery during COVID lockdowns - study
One in seven patients miss cancer surgery during COVID lockdowns - study
One in seven cancer patients around the world have missed out on potentially life-saving operations during COVID-19 lockdowns, a new study reveals. Planned cancer surgery was affected by lockdowns regardless of the local COVID-19 rates at that time, with patients in lower income countries at highest risk of missing their surgery.