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Pharmacology - Health - 03.04.2024
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
A recent breakthrough sheds light on how the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human red blood cells. The study, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, reveals the role of a sugar called sialic acid in this invasion process.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.04.2024
Netflix misses the mark by trivializing teenagers' pain
Netflix misses the mark by trivializing teenagers’ pain
UCalgary-led research discovers movies and TV series aimed at adolescents reinforce gender and racialized pain stereotypes. Researchers at the University of Calgary and the University of Bath, U.K., are calling on Netflix to do a better job of representing the kind of pain typically experienced by 12- to 18-year-olds.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
Ultrasound therapy shows promise as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease
Ultrasound therapy shows promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease
University of Queensland researchers have found targeting amyloid plaque in the brain is not essential for ultrasound to deliver cognitive improvement in neurodegenerative disorders. Dr Gerhard Leinenga Professor Jürgen Götz from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) said the finding challenges the conventional notion in Alzheimer's disease research that targeting and clearing amyloid plaque is essential to improve cognition.

Pharmacology - Health - 01.04.2024
New synthesis platform allows for rapid cancer drug synthesis and testing
New synthesis platform allows for rapid cancer drug synthesis and testing
Researchers have developed a new platform for the synthesis, analysis and testing of new compounds which may one day treat cancer The discovery of new compounds with pharmacological properties can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in developing workflows that allow for the rapid synthesis and testing of multiple compounds in parallel.

Health - History / Archeology - 29.03.2024
Crimean-Congo Fever: molecular mechanism of infection discovered
The Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus (CCHFV), first described in 1944, is also spreading rapidly in Europe due to global warming and is included in the WHO list of infectious agents with epidemic or pandemic potential as a top priority. There are currently no therapeutic or preventative measures available against the disease, which is mainly transmitted by ticks and is fatal in 40 per cent of cases.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.03.2024
TB vaccine may enable elimination of the disease in cattle by reducing its spread
Vaccination not only reduces the severity of TB in infected cattle, but reduces its spread in dairy herds by 89%, research finds. Our study suggests that vaccination not only reduces the progression of the disease, but that if vaccinated animals become infected, they are substantially less infectious to others.

Health - Materials Science - 28.03.2024
New method developed to isolate HIV particles
New method developed to isolate HIV particles
Researchers at Leipzig University and Ulm University have developed a new method to isolate HIV from samples more easily, potentially making it easier to detect infection with the virus. They focus on peptide nanofibrils (PNFs) on magnetic microparticles, a promising tool and hybrid material for targeted binding and separation of viral particles.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.03.2024
'Exhausted' immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention
’Exhausted’ immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have created the world's largest catalogue of human breast cells, which has revealed early cell changes in healthy carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. We're very excited about this discovery, because it opens up potential for a preventative treatment other than surgery for carriers of BRCA breast cancer gene mutations.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.03.2024
Cell research: New lysosomal dipeptide transporter described
In a recently published research paper, led by Marko Roblek from MedUni Vienna's Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, the function of a specific protein (SLC MFSD1) as a dipeptide transporter has been described for the first time. Dysregulation of MFSD1 is associated with liver disease, lymphocyte formation disorders and tumor metastasis, making these proteins highly relevant clinically.

Health - Philosophy - 28.03.2024
Living ethics: a new avenue for health ethics
In the form of a scientific article published at the end of January in the journal Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, the team led by éric Racine , from the Université de Montréal, is proposing for the first time a formal definition of living ethics and its founding principles. In a creative, collaborative approach, this publication addresses the theoretical, methodological and practical frameworks that govern living ethics, as well as the factors that can hinder its implementation.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.03.2024
Neurons spoil your appetite
Neurons spoil your appetite
Satiety, nausea or anxiety can all lead to a loss of appetite. Delaying eating can be a healthy move by the body to prevent further damage and to gain time for regenerating. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Intelligence now identified the circuit in the brain that prevents mice from eating when they feel nauseous.

Health - Psychology - 28.03.2024
Link between homelessness and dementia
Link between homelessness and dementia
Study shows people experiencing homelessness more likely to develop dementia, and at a younger age The prevalence of dementia in unhoused people was almost two times greater than in the general population, with a higher prevalence for age groups younger than 85 years, according to new research led by researchers at Western, ICES and Lawson Health Research Institute.

Health - 28.03.2024
Patients with delirium more likely to develop dementia
Patients with delirium more likely to develop dementia
University of Queensland researchers have found older patients who experience delirium are three times more likely to develop dementia. Professor Ruth Hubbard from UQ's Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR) said the study also found that every episode of delirium increased the chance of developing dementia by 20 per cent.

Health - 28.03.2024
Almost one-in-five suffering from long COVID
Almost one-in-five suffering from long COVID
A study of more than 11,000 Australians who tested positive to COVID-19 in 2022 has revealed almost one-in-five were still experiencing ongoing symptoms three months after their initial diagnosis, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU). The study was conducted in Western Australia (WA), with participants drawn from the almost 71,000 adults who tested positive to COVID-19 in WA between 16 July 2022 and 3 August 2022.

Health - 28.03.2024
Rural residents feel less lonely than their urban neighbours
Rural residents feel less lonely than their urban neighbours
People living in rural communities in Scotland are less likely to experience loneliness and poor wellbeing than those living in urban areas, according to new research from the University of Glasgow. The study, published in the Journal of Public Health, looked at the differences in loneliness, social support, and social networks between urban and rural-based individuals.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.03.2024
Risk factors for faster aging in the brain revealed in new study
Researchers from the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Oxford have used data from UK Biobank participants to reveal that diabetes, traffic-related air pollution and alcohol intake are the most harmful out of 15 modifiable risk factors for dementia. The researchers had previously identified a 'weak spot' in the brain, which is a specific network of higher-order regions that not only develop later during adolescence, but also show earlier degeneration in old age.

Health - 27.03.2024
Dual effect of epicardial fat in patients with acute myocardial infarction
Dual effect of epicardial fat in patients with acute myocardial infarction
A study shows the dual effect of epicardial fat in patients with acute myocardial infarction Researchers from several institutions, including the University of Valencia and the INCLIVA Health Research Institute, of the University Clinical Hospital of Valencia, have developed a study to evaluate the correlation between epicardial adipose tissue (the layer of fat covering the heart), with infarct size and reduction in cardiac function in the short (1 week) and long term (6 months) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

Health - Life Sciences - 27.03.2024
Energy requirements for T cell functionality decoded
A research team led by Loïc Dupré (Department of Dermatology, MedUni Vienna) has conducted experiments to identify a coordinated molecular axis that governs the functionality of T cells. The study reveals how the availability of cellular energy controls the remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, a central cellular activity that determines the ability of T cells to migrate and establish dynamic contacts.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.03.2024
How some heart medications impact gut health
How some heart medications impact gut health
UCalgary study finds certain medications decrease diversity and beneficial microorganisms found in the gut, which may affect overall health Our intestines house trillions of microorganisms known as the gut microbiota. These microorganisms are important players in both drug metabolism and certain conditions like high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and diabetes.

Health - Veterinary - 27.03.2024
New research from the RVC highlights most common disorders in UK pet guinea pigs
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has identified the most common conditions in pet guinea pigs in the UK are overgrown nails, ringworm and eye ulcers. Several of these common conditions are linked to sedentary lives in captivity and therefore offer opportunities to reduce their frequency.