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Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 20.05.2024
First glimpse of an exoplanet interior
First glimpse of an exoplanet interior
Webb telescope offers first glimpse of an exoplanet's interior Methane found in WASP-107 b reveals core mass, turbulent skies, and other key insights in the search for habitable worlds beyond our solar system A surprisingly low amount of methane and a super-sized core hide within the cotton candy-like planet WASP-107 b. The revelations, based on data obtained by the James Webb Space Telescope , mark the first measurements of an exoplanet'

Innovation - Computer Science - 13.05.2024
Chatbots tell people what they want to hear
A Johns Hopkins-led team found that chatbots reinforce our biases, providing insight into how AI could widen the public divide on controversial issues Chatbots share limited information, reinforce ideologies, and, as a result, can lead to more polarized thinking when it comes to controversial issues, according to new Johns Hopkins University-led research.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.05.2024
Potential tool against harmful insects
Potential tool against harmful insects
Fruit fly testes offer potential tool against harmful insects An enzyme found in fruit fly testes could control bugs that carry disease and harm crops by stunting their ability to procreate, Johns Hopkins researchers found A way to curb nagging insects has been flying under our radar-an enzyme from fruit fly testes.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 26.04.2024
'Surprisingly strategic' mice think like babies
’Surprisingly strategic’ mice think like babies
Findings by Johns Hopkins neuroscientists deepen our understanding of animal cognition Are mice clever enough to be strategic? Kishore Kuchibhotla , a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist who studies learning in humans and animals, and who has long worked with mice, wondered why rodents often performed poorly in tests when they knew how to perform well.

Health - 22.04.2024
Benefits of intermittent fasting questioned
Benefits of intermittent fasting questioned
New Johns Hopkins study challenges benefits of intermittent fasting Both time-restricted eating and regularly planned meals led to similar weight loss results, suggesting that total calories may be more important than meal timing When it comes to weight loss, how many calories you consume might be more important than when you consume them, challenging the popularity of intermittent fasting, according to a new study of time-restricted eating by researchers at Johns Hopkins University published April 19 in Annals of Internal Medicine .

Health - Pharmacology - 18.04.2024
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Study suggests adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults A Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study suggests early-life stress may lead to prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after childbirth and in turn, postpartum depression A Johns Hopkins Medicine -led research team reports in a new study that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2024
What's quieter than a fish? A school
What’s quieter than a fish? A school
Surprising study finds schools of fish can make less noise than a solitary swimmer Swimming in schools makes fish surprisingly stealthy underwater, with a group able to sound like a single fish. The new findings by Johns Hopkins University engineers working with a high-tech simulation of schooling mackerel, offers new insight into why fish swim in schools and promise for the design and operation of much quieter submarines and autonomous undersea vehicles.

Environment - 03.04.2024
California leads U.S. emissions of little-known greenhouse gas
California leads U.S. emissions of little-known greenhouse gas
The state emits more of the common pesticide sulfuryl fluoride than the rest of country combined, a Johns Hopkins study finds California, a state known for its aggressive greenhouse gas reduction policies, is ironically the nation's greatest emitter of one: sulfuryl fluoride. As much as 17% of global emissions of this gas, a common pesticide for treating termites and other wood-infesting insects, stem from the United States.

Politics - Media - 01.04.2024
An up-close look at pro-democracy conservatives
Report provides up-close look at pro-democracy conservatives In contrast to those who reject the results of the 2020 election, nearly a third of Republicans accept the results, trust institutions, and appreciate diverse political perspectives Pro-democracy conservatives appreciate diverse political ideas, value journalism, and trust institutions including elections, according to a new report that defines this quiet but potentially powerful movement.

Health - Computer Science - 20.03.2024
AI can now detect COVID-19 in lung ultrasound images
AI can now detect COVID-19 in lung ultrasound images
An automated detection tool developed by Johns Hopkins researchers could help ER doctors diagnose patients quickly and accurately Artificial intelligence can spot COVID-19 in lung ultrasound images much like facial recognition software can spot a face in a crowd, new research shows. The findings boost AI-driven medical diagnostics and bring health care professionals closer to being able to quickly diagnose patients with COVID-19 and other pulmonary diseases with algorithms that comb through ultrasound images to identify signs of disease.

Health - Innovation - 18.03.2024
Engineers' new approach brings images into focus
Engineers’ new approach brings images into focus
Pixel perfect: Engineers' new approach brings images into focus From creating robotic navigation systems to deblurring vacation selfies, Johns Hopkins' new 'Progressively Deblurring Radiance Field' technology has a wide range of potential applications Johns Hopkins researchers have developed an efficient new method to turn blurry images into clear, sharp ones.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 07.03.2024
Interstellar signal linked to aliens was actually just a truck
Interstellar signal linked to aliens was actually just a truck
The findings from a Johns Hopkins University-led team raise doubts that materials pulled last year from the ocean are alien materials from a 2014 meteor fireball Sound waves thought to be from a 2014 meteor fireball north of Papua New Guinea were almost certainly vibrations from a truck rumbling along a nearby road, new Johns Hopkins University-led research shows.

Astronomy / Space - 27.02.2024
New measurement captures clearer picture of our galaxy and beyond
New measurement captures clearer picture of our galaxy and beyond
Results demonstrate novel strategy to probe the physics and history of the universe With unique capabilities to track microwave energy fluctuations, a small observatory in the Andes mountains of northern Chile produced maps of 75% of the sky as part of an effort to more accurately measure the universe's origin and evolution.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.02.2024
Potential breakthrough in food allergy management
Potential breakthrough in food allergy management
Injectable drug significantly reduces kids' reactions to food allergens A Johns Hopkins Medicine study suggests omalizumab could become a 'life-changing' medication for patients with multiple food allergies A study led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center shows omalizumab-an injectable, Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for treating asthma and other allergic conditions-substantially reduced potentially life-threatening reactions in patients with an allergy to peanut and other common food allergies.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.02.2024
Miniature terminator dishes out droplets to decimate drug-resistant bacteria
Miniature terminator dishes out droplets to decimate drug-resistant bacteria
Johns Hopkins researchers develop RoboDrop, a robotic platform capable of rapidly screening multiple combinations of antibiotics simultaneously to find the most potent mixtures At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, earlier this month, experts cautioned that by 2050, as many as 10 million people a year could die from drug-resistant bacteria, viruses, and other bugs.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.02.2024
New method aims to optimize HIV treatments
New method aims to optimize HIV treatments
New method aims to optimize HIV treatments, improve quality of life Johns Hopkins team develops a way to personalize antiretroviral therapy to reduce side effects In the quest to overcome quality-of-life altering side effects linked to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in people with HIV, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers has developed a new way to optimize HIV treatments that balances suppression of the virus with a strategy to reduce side effects, ultimately improving the quality of life for individuals undergoing treatment.

Environment - Chemistry - 21.02.2024
Pesticides found in kale but at low-risk levels
Pesticides found in kale but at low-risk levels
Novel chemical analysis by a Johns Hopkins-led team provides insight into safety of Maryland-grown greens Kale fans can rest easy knowing pesticides used to grow the hearty greens are unlikely to end up in their salads or smoothies, a new chemical analysis of the superfood suggests. Conducting novel tests that provide the most complete picture to date of a crop's chemical makeup, the Johns Hopkins-led team found several pesticides and compounds in Maryland-farmed kale-but no cause for alarm.

Health - Computer Science - 20.02.2024
Improving AI accuracy in medical settings
Using large language models to accurately analyze doctors' notes Johns Hopkins and Columbia University computer scientists combat the inaccurate correlations that artificial intelligence learns from text data The amount of digital data available is greater than ever before, including in health care, where doctors' notes are routinely entered into electronic health record systems.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.02.2024
Rapid home tests are reliable
Rapid home tests are reliable
Rapid COVID-19 tests done at home are reliable, study finds Findings from recent investigation by Johns Hopkins researchers and collaborators suggest physicians can feel confident prescribing treatment based on results from patient-reported, self-administered tests In a study involving nearly 1,000 patients seen at a Baltimore field hospital during a five-month period in 2022, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the University of Maryland Sch

Health - Pharmacology - 06.02.2024
Exploring sex-specific features of HIV
Exploring sex-specific features of HIV
Johns Hopkins researcher Eileen Scully advocates for including sex as a biological variable in preclinical and clinical trials This article was originally published by Dome in its January/February 2024 issue. Early in her career, Johns Hopkins physician-scientist Eileen Scully began to explore ways that viral infections such as HIV, SARS-CoV-2 and tuberculosis manifest differently in individuals.
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