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Life Sciences - Environment - 09:02
The defensive arsenal of plant roots
The defensive arsenal of plant roots
A team from the University of Geneva has discovered the mechanisms that regulate the formation of the protective layer of plant roots. Plants adapt to their nutritional needs by modifying the permeability of their roots through the production or degradation of a cork-like layer called suberin. By studying the regulation of this protective layer in Arabidopsis thaliana , an international team, led by scientists from the University of Geneva , Switzerland, has discovered four molecular factors responsible for the genetic activation of suberin.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
Bizarre armoured spikes belong to oldest ankylosaur ever discovered
Bizarre armoured spikes belong to oldest ankylosaur ever discovered
An unusual fossil showing a series of spikes fused to a rib has been revealed to be the remains of the oldest ankylosaur ever found and the first from the African continent. The exciting discovery was made in the Middle Atlas Mountains of Morocco at the same site where researchers from the Natural History Museum (NHM) previously discovered the oldest stegosaur ever found.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
Diversity matters
Diversity matters
09/23/2021 The higher the biological diversity in an ecosystem, the better the important processes there function. A heterogeneous environment promotes this effect, while intensive land use weakens it, as a new study shows. Microorganisms, plants, and animals accomplish great feats every day. For example, by decomposing material, producing plant biomass, or pollinating flowers, they keep nature 'up and running,' thereby securing the livelihood of humans.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.09.2021
Cells, cylinders and a vision of the future
Cells, cylinders and a vision of the future
The "gene scissors" CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to precisely modify genes in order to study their function in an organism. A researcher at Eawag has now succeeded for the first time in establishing the gene scissors for a fish cell line of rainbow trout. This means that, as of now, genetically modified cell lines can be produced.

Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
Decoding Birds’ Brain Signals Into Syllables of Song
Researchers can predict what syllables a bird will sing—and when it will sing them—by reading electrical signals in its brain, reports a new study from the University of California San Diego. Having the ability to predict a bird's vocal behavior from its brain activity is an early step toward building vocal prostheses for humans who have lost the ability to speak.

Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
How tactile vibrations create illusions
How tactile vibrations create illusions
Researchers from the University of Geneva and UNIFR decipher how the amplitude and frequency of tactile vibrations can bias how the brain interprets them. Among the traditional five human senses, touch is perhaps the least studied. Yet, it is solicited everywhere, all the time, and even more so in recent years with the widespread daily use of electronic devices that emit vibrations.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.09.2021
How Poxviruses Multiply
How Poxviruses Multiply
09/23/2021 Poxviruses have found a unique way of translating their genes into proteins in the infected organism. A team of researchers from Würzburg shows for the first time how the molecular machinery involved works at an atomic level. The last case of smallpox worldwide occurred in Somalia in October 1977.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2021
A Glimpse into the ocean's biological carbon pump
A Glimpse into the ocean’s biological carbon pump
Oceans absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through microscopic algae that carry out photosynthesis and then sink to the deep sea when they die. This sinking enhances the degradation processes, as researchers have now discovered. Oceans play a key role in the global carbon dioxide balance. This is because billions of tiny algae live there, absorbing carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and incorporating it into their biomass.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.09.2021
ADHD and impulsivity: new potential targets to approach the treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders
ADHD and impulsivity: new potential targets to approach the treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders
A study published in the journal Pharmacological Research describes the existence of a complex built by dopamine and noradrenergic receptors that could be a therapeutic target of potential interest to tackle the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and impulsivity. The paper, a preclinical study, has been carried out by the Research Group on Molecular Neuropharmacology, under the supervision of the lecturer Vicent Casadó, from the Faculty of Biology and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona ( IBUB ).

Life Sciences - 21.09.2021
Our eyes and brain work together to create a ’pipeline’ of meaning - new study
Humans read by 'pre-processing' written words to create a pipeline of meaning, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. A study, published in Nature Communications , shows that each pre-processing judgement can take place extremely rapidly - within just 100ms after the eye lands on the previous word.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.09.2021
Breast cancers: ruptures in cell nuclei promotes tumor invasion
Breast cancers: ruptures in cell nuclei promotes tumor invasion
Cell nuclei protect the DNA. Nuclei can rupture when cells are deformed, causing DNA damage. In the case of breast cancer, this damage makes tumour cells more invasive, with increased risk of metastasis. When cells multiply and migrate, they can be compressed and their nucleus may break open. This phenomenon causes DNA damage.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.09.2021
Insect species survives without sexual reproduction
Insect species survives without sexual reproduction
International researchers including the University of Göttingen demonstrate for the first time that animals can survive very long periods of time without sex It was thought that the survival of animal species over a geologically long period of time without sexual reproduction would be very unlikely, if not impossible.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2021
Primate neurons have fewer synapses than mice in visual cortex
UChicago, Argonne study finds mouse neurons have two to five times more synapses Primates are generally considered "smarter" than mice. But in a surprising finding, neuroscience researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that mice actually have more synapses connecting the neurons in their brains.

Life Sciences - Campus - 21.09.2021
Researchers Build Embryo-Like Structures from Human Stem Cells
Research on human embryos is vital to understanding the earliest stages of human development. Currently, this research is conducted on surplus embryos willingly donated by individuals who have undergone in vitro fertilization. Nevertheless, this research is limited by the availability of embryos and strict international ethical time limits on how long an embryo is allowed to develop in the laboratory (14 days maximum).

Life Sciences - Health - 17.09.2021
B cells of the immune system discovered in the meninges
B cells of the immune system discovered in the meninges
A comprehensive analysis of white blood cells in the tissue surrounding the brain / Study published in the journal "Nature Neuroscience" The brain holds numerous unsolved medical mysteries. Only a few years ago it was discovered that the outer layer of the meninges is interlaced with lymphatic vessels.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.09.2021
Can fruit fly research help improve cancer survival?
Cross section of a fruit fly brain showing how substances from the blood (green) seep in after cytokines from a distant tumor break down the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain. Blocking the cytokine improved the health and survival of both fruit flies and mice with cancer and could do the same for human cancer patients.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2021
For some peptides, killing bacteria an inside job
For some peptides, killing bacteria an inside job
Rice chemists' analysis advances research on alternatives to antibiotics Peptides could be primed to solve the knotty problem of antibiotic resistance among humans. Rice scientists believe they can help. The Rice lab of chemist Anatoly Kolomeisky modeled a range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), natural and varied molecules that aid biological systems, to evaluate the mechanisms they use to stop harmful bacteria.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.09.2021
Coconut tree cloning breakthrough will help propagation and preservation
Coconut tree cloning breakthrough will help propagation and preservation
Coconut trees grow slowly and are difficult to clone. Scientists at KU Leuven and the Alliance multiplied seedlings faster and conserved coconut genetic resources for the long term. Coconut trees grow slowly and are difficult to clone. Scientists at KU Leuven and the Alliance have developed a method to multiply seedlings faster and conserve coconut genetic resources for the long term.

Life Sciences - 15.09.2021
Primate mothers may carry infants after death as a way of grieving
Some primate species may express grief over the death of their infant by carrying the corpse with them, sometimes for months, according to a new UCL-led study - with implications for our understanding of how non-human animals experience emotion. Published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , the researchers compiled data from anecdotes reported in 126 publications on primate behaviour.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.09.2021
Fixing protein production errors lengthens lifespan
Reducing naturally occurring errors in protein synthesis (production) improves both health and lifespan, finds a new study in simple model organisms led by researchers at UCL and MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences. The novel findings, published in Cell Metabolism , are the first to demonstrate a direct link between fewer protein mistakes and longevity.
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