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Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2010
Researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer's, before symptoms appear
Researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer’s, before symptoms appear
Estimates are that some 10 percent of people over the age of 65 will develop Alzheimer's disease, the scourge that robs people of their memories and, ultimately, their lives. While researchers race to find both the cause and the cure, others are moving just as fast to find the earliest signs that will predict an eventual onset of the disease, well before any outward symptoms.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2010
UCLA researchers image earliest signs of Alzheimer’s, before symptoms appear
While researchers race to find both the cause and the cure, others are moving just as fast to find the earliest signs that will predict an eventual onset of the disease, well before any outward symptoms. The reason is simple: The earlier the diagnosis, the earlier treatments can be applied. Now, through the use of sophisticated brain-imaging techniques, researchers at UCLA have been able to predict a brain's progression to Alzheimer's by measuring subtle changes in brain structure over time, changes that occur long before symptoms can be seen.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2010
Researchers Find New Insights into Inherited Retinal Disease
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered new links between a common form of inherited blindness affecting children and a gene known as Abelson helper integration site-1 (AHI1).  Their findings, which may lead to new therapies and improved diagnostics for retinal disease, will appear online in advance of publication in the journal Nature Genetics on January 17.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2010
Scientists Show How Brain Tumors Outsmart Drugs
Researchers at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores UCSD Cancer Center have shown one way in which gliomas, a deadly type of brain tumor, can evade drugs aimed at blocking a key cell signaling protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR),that is crucial for tumor growth.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2010
UCL study: Emotions are a universal language
UCL study: Emotions are a universal language
A new study, led by UCL's Professor Sophie Scott, suggests that all humans share basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness ' and vocalise them in similar ways. The results of the study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , provide further evidence that such emotions form a set of basic, evolved functions that are shared by all humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.01.2010
Genetic testing no real help in predicting type 2 diabetes
Genetic testing no real help in predicting type 2 diabetes
New UCL research shows that genetic testing provides no real help in predicting the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for heart disease. The findings question the benefit of genetic direct-to-public home screening tests currently available on the market, which claim to be able to predict the risk of diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2010
Study predicts HIV drug resistance will surge
New research based on a novel mathematical model predicts that a wave of drug-resistant HIV strains will emerge in San Francisco within the next five years. These strains could prove disastrous by hindering control of the HIV pandemic. In a study published Jan. 14 on the website of the journal Science, researchers from the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the University of California, San Francisco's HIV AIDS Program at San Francisco General Hospital, developed a complex network model that tracks the transmission of multiple strains of HIV.

Life Sciences - Veterinary - 21.01.2010
The 'sultan of slime': Biologist continues to be fascinated by organisms after nearly 70 years of study
The 'sultan of slime': Biologist continues to be fascinated by organisms after nearly 70 years of study
Where others see dirt, John Bonner sees beauty. Where others see jumbled clumps, he sees highly sophisticated organization. At age 89, Bonner, the George M. Moffett Professor Emeritus of Biology , is one of the world's leading experts on cellular slime molds, found in soils the world over. He has led the way in making "Dictyostelium discoideum" a model organism central to examining some of the major questions in experimental biology.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2010
Scientists shed new light on walking
Scientists shed new light on walking
Researchers at the medical university Karolinska Institutet have created a genetically modified mouse in which certain neurons can be activated by blue light. Shining blue light on brainstems or spinal cords isolated from these mice produces walking-like motor activity. The findings, which are published in the scientific , are of potential significance to the recovery of walking after spinal cord injury.

Life Sciences - 20.01.2010
Some Mouse Sperm Can Identify, and Even Cooperate with, its Brethren
Cambridge, Mass. January 20, 2010 - Some mouse sperm can discriminate between its brethren and competing sperm from other males, clustering with its closest relatives to swim faster in the race to the egg. But this sort of cooperation appears to be present only in certain promiscuous species, where it affords an individual's sperm a competitive advantage over that of other males.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2010
Nano-motors facilitate communication between brain cells
Nano-motors facilitate communication between brain cells
MRC-funded scientists led by Dr Josef Kittler (UCL Neuroscience) have identified how nano-sized motors in nerve cells help to regulate the balance of communication in the brain. The findings may also help to explain why communication between nerve cells is disrupted in Huntington's disease, leading to altered electrical behaviour of nerve cells in this disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2010
Mice behavior studies can apply to human behavior
Studying animals in behavioral experiments has been a cornerstone of psychological research, but whether the observations are relevant for human behavior has been unclear. Now, Weill Cornell Medical College (WCMC) researchers have identified an alteration to the DNA of a gene that imparts similar anxiety-related behavior in both humans and mice, demonstrating that laboratory animals can be accurately used to study these human behaviors.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2010
Potent Screening Tool Finds New Roles for Some Drugs in Rest, Waking
Cambridge, Mass. January 14, 2010 - A robust new technique for screening drugs' effects on zebrafish behavior is pointing Harvard University scientists toward unexpected compounds and pathways that may govern sleep and wakefulness in humans. Among their more intriguing findings, described this week in the journal Science: Various anti-inflammatory agents in the immune system, long known to induce sleep during infection, may also shape normal sleep/wake cycles.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2010
New target discovered for treatment of cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have discovered a new way of blocking the formation of blood vessels and halting the growth of tumours in mice. A substance that exploits this mechanism could be developed into a new treatment for cancer. For a cancer tumour to be able to grow larger than the size of a pea, the cancer cells need to stimulate the formation of new blood vessels that can supply the tumour with oxygen and nutrients, a process known as angiogenesis.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.01.2010
Scientists pioneer new way to select MPAs
Newly published research details how remote fisheries closures were designed to protect Rockall Bank, a deep water coral habitat in Northwest Scotland. The research shows how, for the first time, scientific records, fishers’ knowledge and surveillance data on fishing activity have been combined to effectively select a Marine Protected Area.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2010
Ongoing Human Evolution Could Explain Recent Rise in Certain Disorders
Cambridge, Mass. January 10, 2010 - The subtle but ongoing pressures of human evolution could explain the seeming rise of disorders such as autism, autoimmune diseases, and reproductive cancers, researchers write in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Certain adaptations that once benefited humans may now be helping such ailments persist in spite of – or perhaps because of – advancements in modern culture and medicine.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2010
Attune acoustic focusing cytometer brings technology developed at LANL to the marketplace
Attune acoustic focusing cytometer brings technology developed at LANL to the marketplace
Life Technologies Corporation recently announced the release of the AttuneTM Acoustic Focusing Cytometer. Applications of first-of-its-kind cytometer system in basic cell biology research and drug discovery Los Alamos, New Mexico, January 7, 2010—Life Technologies Corporation recently announced the release of the AttuneTM Acoustic Focusing Cytometer, a first-of-its-kind cytometer system that uses acoustic waves to precisely control the movement of cells during analysis.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 07.01.2010
New Approach Precisely Tracks Evolution’s Footprints in the Human Genome
Cambridge, Mass. January 7, 2010 - Fossils may provide tantalizing clues to human history but they also lack some vital information, such as revealing which pieces of human DNA have been favored by evolution because they confer beneficial traits - resistance to infection or the ability to digest milk, for example.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 07.01.2010
Finding About How the Nervous System Learns and Encodes Motion Could Improve Stroke Recovery
Cambridge, Mass. January 7, 2010 - Bioengineers have taken a small step toward improving physical recovery in stroke patients by showing that a key feature of how limb motion is encoded in the nervous system plays a crucial role in how new motor skills are learned. Published in the November 25, 2009 issue of Neuron, a Harvard-based study about the neural learning elements responsible for motor learning may help scientists design rehabilitation protocols in which motor adaptation occurs more readily, potentially allowing for a more rapid recovery.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2010
Natural compound blocks hepatitis C infection, UCLA study finds
UCLA researchers have identified two cellular proteins that are important factors in hepatitis C virus infection, a finding that may result in the approval of new and less toxic treatments for the disease, which can lead to liver cancer and cirrhosis. An estimated 270 to 300 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C, and the conventional treatments — interferon and ribavirin — can have significant side effects.