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Health - Life Sciences - 03.06.2024
’Rosetta Stone’ of cell signaling could expedite precision cancer medicine
An atlas of human protein kinases enables scientists to map cell signaling pathways with unprecedented speed and detail. A newly complete database of human protein kinases and their preferred binding sites provides a powerful new platform to investigate cell signaling pathways. Culminating 25 years of research, MIT, Harvard University, and Yale scientists and collaborators have unveiled a comprehensive atlas of human tyrosine kinases - enzymes that regulate a wide variety of cellular activities - and their binding sites.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
The Route Into the Cell Influences the Outcome of Sars-Cov-2 Infection
The Route Into the Cell Influences the Outcome of Sars-Cov-2 Infection
A surface protein helps viruses to enter cells. This has far-reaching consequences for the infection. How exactly do Sars-Cov-2 particles enter host cells? An international team led by Dr Richard Brown from Dr Daniel Todt's Computational Virology group at the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, together with researchers from the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, investigated this question.

Life Sciences - 31.05.2024
Coevolution a driving force behind biodiversity on Earth
Coevolution a driving force behind biodiversity on Earth
Coevolution is a driving force behind generating biodiversity on Earth, explaining why there are millions of different species, according to a new study led by The Australian National University (ANU). Coevolution occurs when closely interacting species drive evolutionary changes in each other and can lead to speciation - the evolution of new species - but until now evidence was scarce.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
Does sleep clear more toxins from the brain than when we're awake?
Does sleep clear more toxins from the brain than when we’re awake?
Dr Eleftheria Kodosaki (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) examines new evidence in The Conversation that suggests brain clearance is actually lower during sleep, contrary to the belief that the brain gets rid of more toxic waste when we're asleep than when we're awake. There's no doubt sleep is good for the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
Clone of Comment: The long history of weaponising law against Jews
Clone of Comment: The long history of weaponising law against Jews
Dr Eleftheria Kodosaki (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) examines new evidence in The Conversation that suggests brain clearance is actually lower during sleep, contrary to the belief that the brain gets rid of more toxic waste when we're asleep than when we're awake. There's no doubt sleep is good for the brain.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 30.05.2024
Study connects genetic risk for autism to changes observed in the brain
Health + Behavior UCLA Health study is part of massive brain and genetic mapping initiative Key takeaways The study by UCLA scientists is the first to identify a potential mechanism that connects changes occurring in the brain in autism spectrum disorder directly to underlying genetic causes. Identifying these types of complex molecular mechanisms could eventually help lead to the development of therapeutics to treat autism.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.05.2024
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Two decades of cuckoo research have helped scientists to explain how battles between species can cause new species to arise This exciting new finding could potentially apply to any pairs of species that are in battle with each other..the coevolutionary arms race could cause new species to emerge - and increase biodiversity on our planet Rebecca Kilner The theory of coevolution says that when closely interacting species drive evolutionary changes in each other this can lead to speciation - the evolution of new species.

Life Sciences - 30.05.2024
More wolves does not necessarily equal fewer foxes or badgers
The assumption that the numbers of smaller predators will decline when large predator populations rise, is not necessarily valid. For mammals in Europe, this relationship appears to exist only in specific cases. Utrecht biologists Thomas van Schaik, Marijke van Kuijk , and Liesbeth Sterck conclude this based on a literature review they conducted, which was recently published in the scientific journal Mammal Review.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.05.2024
Too much or too little: the impact of protein dosage on development
Too much or too little: the impact of protein dosage on development
A recent study carried out at the University of Lausanne reveals that both excess and deficiency of the same protein can lead to severe intellectual impairment. The discovery opens up vital prospects for the early diagnosis of a rare developmental disorder. A team of scientists led by Alexandre Reymond, an expert in human genetics at the Centre intégratif de génomique (CIG) and Professor at the Faculty of Biology and Medicine (FBM) at the University of Lausanne (UNIL), has produced a major breakthrough in the detection of a rare genetic disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.05.2024
Stem cells boosted with glucose to combat osteoarthritis
Scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered how to increase the lifespan of stem cells injected into cartilage to facilitate the regeneration of tissue damaged by osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative disease of the cartilage that affects the majority of the elderly population, seriously compromises patients' quality of life.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
Deep stimulation of the human brain: a new non-invasive technique EPFL-UCLouvain
Scientists at EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne), led by Prof. Friedhelm C. Hummel and post-doctoral fellow Pierre Vassiliadis (EPFL and UCLouvain Institute of Neuroscience), have successfully tested a new technique enabling deep stimulation of the human brain, without surgery or implants, for potential therapeutic purposes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
Unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles
Unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles
But it will still be a challenge to elevate the overall level of biodiversity in the city Key takeaways UCLA researchers, in partnership with the city of Los Angeles, have developed the urban association index to help identify how well or poorly individual wildlife species are doing in the city. The researchers found unexpected pockets of biodiversity deep in the city, but they say it will still be a challenge to elevate Los Angeles' overall level of biodiversity.

Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
Acute sense of touch helps hummingbirds hover near flowers without bumping them
Acute sense of touch helps hummingbirds hover near flowers without bumping them
Science + Technology A new study shows they create a 3D body map when gusts of air touch their wings Key takeaways Hummingbird flight mechanics have been well studied but far less is known about how their sense of touch helps them sip nectar from a flower without bumping into it. Most of what scientists know about how touch is processed in the brain comes from studies on mammals, but bird brains are very different from mammal brains.

Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
The hunger games
The hunger games
Why do primates have big brains? In the Panamanian rainforest, scientists pitted large-brained primates against smaller-brained mammals to find out who was the smartest forager Primates, including humans, have larger brains than most other mammals, but why? Scientists searching for the answer have long followed a trail pointing to diet-specifically fruit-as the reason for why primates evolved larger brains.

Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
A key protein preserves motor ability during aging
A new study by scientists shows that age-related decline in motor ability can be countered in fruit flies by enhancing the expression of the protein Trio, suggesting potential treatments for age-related movement decline. As we age, we suffer a noticeable decline in motor ability, which affects our quality of life and independence.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.05.2024
New research from the RVC unlocks the key to hummingbird flight
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), UCLA and the University of British Columbia has found that hummingbirds create a 3D map of their body, which may enable them to hover and make nuanced adjustments to their flight dynamics based on the smallest of touches and airflow in their environment.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.05.2024
Scientists identify mechanism behind drug resistance in malaria parasite
SMART researchers find a cellular process called transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) modification influences the malaria parasite's ability to develop resistance. Researchers from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), in collaboration with MIT, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (NTU Singapore), have discovered a new link between malaria parasites' ability to develop resistance to the antimalarial artemisinin (ART) through a cellular process called transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) modification.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.05.2024
Cancer Research: DNA Repair Mechanism Further Elucidated
Cancer Research: DNA Repair Mechanism Further Elucidated
Researchers at the University of Würzburg, led by Caroline Kisker in cooperation with Claudia Höbartner, discovered how the protein XPD detects a severe DNA damage and controls its repair. The XPD protein is a central component of our body's own 'DNA repair team', known as nucleotide excision repair (NER).

Health - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
How bacteria can influence our behavior
How bacteria can influence our behavior
The gut microbiome influences our decisions in social contexts. This is the conclusion of a study led by Sorbonne Université and INSEAD with the participation of the University of Bonn and the University Hospital Bonn (UKB). The study has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Nexus .

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
Better archiving of genetic data
Better archiving of genetic data
Every year, researchers upload vast amounts of genetic information to publicly accessible databases.