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Life Sciences - Health - 08.07.2021
Brain research uncovers 'perfect storm' linked to neurodegenerative disease
Brain research uncovers ’perfect storm’ linked to neurodegenerative disease
A 'perfect storm' of genetic mutations, toxic proteins and a defect in natural cell recycling has been uncovered in University of Queensland research that could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Researchers have found brain cells are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of the triple threat, and two genes - PINK-1 and PDR-1 - are likely to contribute significantly to that vulnerability.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with colleagues at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that the carbonized biomass reduces production of the methane gases naturally occurring in the peat soil.

Life Sciences - Campus - 08.07.2021
Cell structure previously associated with disease actually improves brain function
Researchers at McGill University have shown that a brain cell structure previously thought to be pathological in fact enhances cells' ability to transmit information and correlates with better learning on certain tasks. In a study published , the team investigated swellings that occur in the axons of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
MHH fills important gap in lung research
MHH fills important gap in lung research
For the first time, a team of scientists clearly demonstrates the existence of lipofibroblasts in human luectron microscope In medical research, animal models are used to clarify the development of diseases and to develop suitable therapies. In order to be able to transfer the results to humans, however, it must be ensured that the cell types and molecular signalling pathways studied in detail actually occur in our bodies.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2021
Rare genetic variants confer largest increase in type 2 diabetes risk seen to date
Rare genetic variants confer largest increase in type 2 diabetes risk seen to date
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have identified rare genetic variants - carried by one in 3,000 people - that have a larger impact on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes than any previously identified genetic effect. For complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes, many variants play a role [in disease risk], but often only increasing our risk by a tiny amount.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
Researchers identify an early neuronal dysfunction in Parkinson's that could help early diagnosis
Researchers identify an early neuronal dysfunction in Parkinson’s that could help early diagnosis
Parkinson's is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, a process involving motor manifestations such as tremors, rigidity, slow movements, and postural instability. Although in many cases the cause of the disease is still unknown, mutations in the LRRK2 gene are responsible for 5% of the cases.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 07.07.2021
A man in the moon: why our brains see human faces everywhere
A man in the moon: why our brains see human faces everywhere
Our brain is hardwired to see images of faces in everyday items. Neuroscientist Professor David Alais and colleagues have now discovered why - and why it is we can give those faces an emotional value. It's so commonplace we barely give it a second thought, but human brains seem hardwired to see human faces where there are none - in objects as varied as the moon, toys, plastic bottles, tree trunks and vacuum cleaners.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2021
Researchers identify missing 'switch' that controls essential genes
Researchers identify missing ’switch’ that controls essential genes
Proteins known as transcription factors act as switches that regulate the expression of nearby genes, but the identity of some of these genetic levers has so far remained mysterious. Now, researchers from the Schübeler group have pinpointed a new switch that regulates essential genes in the mouse and the human genome.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.07.2021
Rice, Rutgers developing inhalable COVID-19 vaccine spray
Rice, Rutgers developing inhalable COVID-19 vaccine spray
New strategies would be easier to manufacture, don't require cold storage Scientists at Rice University's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP) are part of a study to develop an inhalable COVID-19 vaccine. The project led by Rutgers University and CTBP scientists at Rice and Northeastern University has produced two vaccine strategies.

Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Inherited memories of a chromosomal site
Inherited memories of a chromosomal site
Two UNIGE teams have discovered that the location of a specific chromosomal site is transmitted between two generations, even if the part of the protein that initially defines that site is absent in the offspring. Most biological traits are inherited through genes, but there are exceptions to this rule.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Early detection of dementia
Early detection of dementia
Alzheimer's and other dementias are among the most widespread diseases today. Diagnosis is complex and can often only be established with certainty late in the course of the disease. A team of researchers, together with clinical partners, is now developing a new diagnostic tool that can detect the first signs of neurodegenerative changes using a sensor belt.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.07.2021
Bacterial survival kit to endure in soil
Bacterial survival kit to endure in soil
Soil bacteria have amazing strategies to attain energy in order to withstand stressful times Soils are one of the most diverse habitats on the planet. There are more than thousand microbial species per gram that significantly influence numerous environmental processes. However, the majority of these organisms are believed to be in a state of 'dormancy' due to environmental stress, such as nutrient-poor conditions.

Life Sciences - Physics - 05.07.2021
Researchers image an entire mouse brain for the first time
Advanced X-ray technology allows researchers to measure from synapse to whole brain level Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have imaged an entire mouse brain across five orders of magnitude of resolution, a step which researchers say will better connect existing imaging approaches and uncover new details about the structure of the brain.

Physics - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Nanomaterials shape and form influences their ability to cross the blood brain barrier - study
Nanomaterials shape and form influences their ability to cross the blood brain barrier - study
Nanomaterials found in consumer and health-care products can pass from the bloodstream to the brain side of a blood-brain barrier model with varying ease depending on their shape - creating potential neurological impacts that could be both positive and negative, a new study reveals. Scientists found that metal-based nanomaterials such as silver and zinc oxide can cross an in vitro model of the 'blood brain barrier' (BBB) as both particles and dissolved ions - adversely affecting the health of astrocyte cells, which control neurological responses.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Discovery from Unicorn Cave in Lower Saxony sheds new light on ancestors' cognitive abilities Since the discovery of the first fossil remains in the 19 th century, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to effectively fashion tools and weapons.

Life Sciences - 05.07.2021
More filling? Tastes great? How flies, and maybe people, choose their food
Flies have discriminating taste. Like a gourmet perusing a menu, they spend much of their time seeking sweet nutritious calories and avoiding bitter, potentially toxic food. But what happens in their brains when they make these food choices? Yale researchers discovered an interesting way to find out.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 05.07.2021
Psychedelic spurs growth of neural connections lost in depression
The psychedelic drug psilocybin, a naturally occurring compound found in some mushrooms, has been studied as a potential treatment for depression for years. But exactly how it works in the brain and how long beneficial results might last is still unclear. In a new study, Yale researchers show that a single dose of psilocybin given to mice prompted an immediate and long-lasting increase in connections between neurons.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2021
Abnormalities in how the brain reorganises prior experiences identified in schizophrenia
Abnormalities in how the brain reorganises prior experiences identified in schizophrenia
Neuroscientists at UCL have, for the first time, identified abnormalities in the way memories are 'replayed' in the brains of people with schizophrenia; researchers say the pathbreaking study provides an entirely new basis for explaining many of the condition's core symptoms. Schizophrenia is a serious and debilitating mental disorder characterised by episodes of psychosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Not only animals and humans host a complex community of microorganisms - plants do this as well. Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently published two new studies that shed light on fundamental aspects of these close - and often overlooked - relationships. Hundreds of different bacterial species live in and on leaves and roots of plants.

Life Sciences - 30.06.2021
From meadow to plate: the cultured meat that replaces animals with grass
From meadow to plate: the cultured meat that replaces animals with grass
An affordable lab system that uses grass blades to turn cells into cultured meat has been developed at the University of Bath. Last updated on Tuesday 6 July 2021 An affordable lab system that uses grass blades to turn cells into cultured meat has been developed at the University of Bath. Researchers have successfully taken grass from the university's campus and used it to create a scaffold that animal cells can attach to and grow on.