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Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Identifying the Neural Link Between Gut Bacteria and Social Behavior in Mice
Could the germs that live inside of our bodies be affecting our ability to socialize and make friends? Research conducted in recent decades suggests that the answer-for mice-is yes. Research has shown that the communities of bacteria that live in a mouse's gut are essential for the animals to exhibit normal social behavior with other mice.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Opinion: Covid linked to loss of brain tissue, but correlation doesn’t prove causation
A study potentially linking Covid-19 to a loss of brain tissue add to concerns about the long term damage the disease can do, but more research is needed to avoid unnecessary scaremongering, says Professor Francois Balloux (UCL Genetics Institute). Early in the pandemic, it became clear that Covid-19 wasn't just a disease of the lungs.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
The evolution of axial patterning
The evolution of axial patterning
Similarity in axis formation of sea anemones and sea urchins provides insight into axis formation in prehistoric animals Body axes are molecular coordinate systems along which regulatory genes are activated. These genes then activate the development of anatomical structures in correct locations in the embryo.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Aquatic life underground
Aquatic life underground
Groundwater is also an ecosystem, but little is known about the biodiversity underground. researchers have now documented the diversity of life in Swiss groundwater in a pilot study - and discovered previously unknown species of amphipods in the process. Here they relied on a citizen science approach.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
How proteins bind 'hidden' DNA
How proteins bind ’hidden’ DNA
How can proteins bind DNA in the cell nucleus, where it is present in form of chromatin, tightly wrapped around histones and therefore mostly inaccessible? Recently, several studies began to uncover the various strategies used by DNA-binding proteins to solve this problem. In a Cell "Leading Edge review", Alicia Michael and Nico Thomä look at these findings and highlight general principles that aim to help predict how a protein recognizes a specific stretch of DNA, even when "hidden" in chromatin.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Key mutations in Alpha variant enable SARS-CoV-2 to overcome evolutionary weak points
Key mutations in Alpha variant enable SARS-CoV-2 to overcome evolutionary weak points
One of the key mutations seen in the 'Alpha variant' of SARS-CoV-2 - the deletion of two amino acids, H69/V70 - enables the virus to overcome chinks in its armour as it evolves, say an international team of scientists. Understanding the significance of key mutations is important because it enables us to predict how a new variant might behave in humans when it is first identified.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2021
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
A team from the UNIGE and the HUG has found that a special type of brain training based on the principle of 'neurofeedback' enables people with attention deficit disorder to improve their ability to concentrate. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects about 7% of children, with a two out of three chance of persisting into adulthood.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Intestinal wall folds by measuring forces
Intestinal wall folds by measuring forces
The human intestine is formed by more than 40 square meters of tissue, with many folds in the internal surface that remind of valleys and mountain peaks. Among other functions, these folds enable an increase in nutrient absorption. Also, the intestine is under a constant renewal, which involves that, approximately every five days, all cells of its internal wall are renewed to guarantee a proper intestinal functioning.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Air pollution from wildfires impacts ability to observe birds
Posted under: Environment , Interactive , News releases , Research , Science As smoky air becomes more common during Washington's wildfire season, many wildlife enthusiasts wonder: What happens to the birds? Few studies have looked at wildfire smoke impacts on animals, let alone birds. And as Washington and the larger West Coast continue to experience more massive wildfires and smoke-filled air, understanding how birds are affected by smoke - and how air pollution may influence our ability to detect birds - are important factors for bird conservation.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Saturated fatty acid levels increase when making memories
Saturated fatty acid levels unexpectedly rise in the brain during memory formation, according to University of Queensland research, opening a new avenue of investigation into how memories are made. Dr Tristan Wallis , from Professor Frederic Meunier's laboratory at UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI), said traditionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids were considered important to health and memory, but this study highlighted the unexpected role of saturated fatty acids.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Protein balance in the reproductive system can prevent disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne found that the balance status of proteins (protein homeostasis) of germline cells influences protein aggregation in other tissues by long-distance signaling Publication in 'Science Advances' A recent study shows that a healthy reproductive system can prevent disease-related protein accumulation in distant tissues, such as neurons, and alteration of mitochondria - the power plants of cells.

Life Sciences - 28.06.2021
Unusual prey: spiders eating snakes
Unusual prey: spiders eating snakes
There are spiders that eat snakes. Observations of snake-eating spiders have been reported around the world. Two researchers from Basel and the US consolidated and analyzed over 300 reports of this unusual predation strategy. Spiders are primarily insectivores, but they occasionally expand their menu by catching and eating small snakes.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2021
Optimising nature
Optimising nature
Today, molecular genetic methods can be used to breed sustainable crops - such as multinutrient rice. Researchers are calling for the risk of new plant varieties to be assessed not on the basis of the breeding method, but on the basis of their characteristics. When it comes to food, many people yearn for nature in its most pristine state.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 28.06.2021
RAMBO speeds searches on huge DNA databases
Rice method cuts indexing times from weeks to hours, search times from hours to minutes Rice University computer scientists are sending RAMBO to rescue genomic researchers who sometimes wait days or weeks for search results from enormous DNA databases. DNA sequencing is so popular, genomic datasets are doubling in size every two years, and the tools to search the data haven't kept pace.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2021
Unique neuron can guide our way home by turning compasses into a gyroscope
Unique neuron can guide our way home by turning compasses into a gyroscope
Finding our way home from work or school is something most of us take for granted. Persons with Alzheimer's disease, however, can get lost even when moving between such familiar locations and often struggle to find their way home. Exactly the same inability to get home is also seen in people who do not have Alzheimer's disease, but instead have suffered damage to a part of their brain called the retrosplenial cortex.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.06.2021
Differences in human, mouse brain cells have important implications for disease research
FINDINGS A UCLA-led study comparing brain cells known as astrocytes in humans and mice found that mouse astrocytes are more resilient to oxidative stress, a damaging imbalance that is a mechanism behind many neurological disorders. A lack of oxygen triggers molecular repair mechanisms in these mouse astrocytes but not in human astrocytes.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 24.06.2021
Marmoset study identifies brain region linking actions to their outcomes
Researchers have discovered a specific brain region underlying 'goal-directed behaviour' - that is, when we consciously do something with a particular goal in mind, for example going to the shops to buy food. This is a first step towards identifying suitable molecular targets for future drug treatments, or other forms of therapy, for devastating mental health disorders such as OCD and addiction.

Life Sciences - Campus - 24.06.2021
First CRISPR/Cas9-based Gene Drive in Plants
New technology designed to breed more robust crops to improve agricultural yield and resist the effects of climate change With a goal of breeding resilient crops that are better able to withstand drought and disease, University of California San Diego scientists have developed the first CRISPR-Cas9-based gene drive in plants.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Plasticity in plants supports the evolution of ecologically specialized species
Role of plasticity as a support for future adaptation depends on specific challenges species have to face as they evolve their specialized ecology / Cologne-based research team gather data for first comparative atlas of the gene expression response to stress in ecologically different plant species An international group of researchers have found out that the ability of certain plants to adapt to future environmental challenges by altering their

Health - Life Sciences - 24.06.2021
Versatile and reliable SARS-CoV-2 antibody assay
Versatile and reliable SARS-CoV-2 antibody assay
Automated microarray rapid test for detecting SARS-CoV-2 antibodies During the continued progression of the Corona pandemic, rapid, inexpensive, and reliable tests will become increasingly important to determine whether people have the associated antibodies - either through infection or vaccination. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed such a rapid antibody test.